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LIBRARY OF 

LASELL JUNIOR COLLEGE 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

19.^1-.^, No. .3.J&... 

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LASELL LEAVES 



0CT03EK, 1914 - JUNE, 1916 



VOLUMES 40-41 



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LA SELL SEMINARY 
AU3URNBALE, MAS Si! ' ' .T3 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/lasellleaves4041lase 



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PALL WUMBER 





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TWO STUDIOS 



164 
TREMONT 
STREET 
Telephone Ox- 
ford 2687 




*ait photo^ 



Q/c/cmClkam/)&un,^top. 




RT in relation to PORTRAIT 
PHOTOGRAPHY is the 

realization of beauty, grace and 
intelligence, as expressed in the finished 
portrait. 

Our advanced 1915 styles we honestly believe 
will appeal to you. Special discount rates to 
all Lasell Students. 



161 

TREMONT 

STREET 

Telephone 

Oxford 858 




Our Stock Never Gets Old 

NEW GOODS ARRIVE EVERY DAY 



A J SUMMERS! 

WHOIFSALE 
ST RETAIL' 



Diamonds 
Watches 
Silver Goods 
Combs 
Cut Glass 
Coral Jewelry 
Roman Pearls 
Ebony Goods 



Vanity Cases 
Photo Frames 
Leather Goods 
Fountain Pens 
Brass Goods 
Chafing Dishes 
Percolators 
Parisian Ivory 



Our Watch and Jewelry Repair Departments do 
the best work at very low prices 



CHARGE 

ACCOUNTS 

OPENED 



MR. F. F. DAVIDSON 
AUBURNDALE 



LASELL LEAVES 



A. SHUMAN & CO. 



The Service Store, Boston 



Tailored Apparel for 
College Girls of 
Rare Distinction 

Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabrics — 

Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 

Splendid Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

l3i/£ Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



We Can Please Yoa 

Come and See tor Yourselt 

Dry Goods, Small Wares, Dress Goods, Silks, 
Velvets, Linings, Laces, Gloves, Ribbons, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Hosiery, Underwear, Millinery, Cloth- 
ing, Hats, Caps, Shoes, and Garments ot every 
description. 



P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-135-137-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 



THE ONE GREAT TREASURE 

FOR EVERY STUDENT 

The Family Music Book 



800 PAGES 
CLOTH 




252 PIECES 
BOUND 



Contains $150 worth of music — vocal 
and instrumental. 

(Transit to Lasell 10 cents extra) 

Circular with complete information sent 
upon request. 

THE BOSTON MUSIC CO. 

26 and 28 West Street Boston, Mass. 

publishers THE B . m. C. EDITION 



LASELL LEAVES 




EVERY HOME 

Needs One or More of Our Rugs 

We can satisfy nearly every rug requirement from our large and compre- 
hensive stock and at a surprisingly low cost 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

BOSTON'S RUG HOUSE 

646 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St. 



Meyer Jonasson & Co 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Waists, Furs and Sweaters 



GARMENTS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 
A SPECIAL FEATURE 



ftoSftEY 

Correct Overgaiter Effects 




This model comes in 
Patent Leather o r 
Gun Metal, Spanish 
heels and Cloth or 
Leather Tops in Gray, 
Black and Fawn. 

PRICES $6 TO $12 

10% cash discount to 
students and faculty of 
Lasell. 



160 Tremont Street Boston 



■ ii 




DUX FEMINA FACTI 



9» 



Vol. XXXX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., OCTOBER, 1914 



No. 



Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 
FLORENCE EVANS 



CAROL RICE 



Local Editor 
HELEN BENSON 



Assistant Local Editor ROSE BAER 



LIST OF OFFICERS 

Editor-in-chief 
NELLIE WOODWARD 

Associate Editors 

Art Editor 
EDITH HODGES 

Personal Editor 
CATHARINE CARTER 



Subscription Editor 
FRANCES HARRIS 



DORIS WALLER 



Exchange Editor 
MAUDE HAYDEN 



Staff Photographer BESS EMERINE 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 

(frontispiece) 4 Personal . . 

Literary 5 Editorial . 

Loeals 10 Exchanges 

Supplement . 23 



.14 
.20 
.21 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar Inside front cover 

Thomas Long Inside front cover 

A. Shuman & Co., 1 

Pinkham & Smith 1 

T. E. Moseley Co. __ 2 

P. P. Adams 1 

Schirmer 1 

Meyer Jonasson & Co 2 

Tohn H. Pray & Sons Co 2 

Chandler & Co 28 

Tordan Marsh Co 28 

Thayer, McNeil Co 29 

C. F. Hoyey&Co 29 

English Tea Room 29 



Cottrell & Leonard 

Maugus Printing Co 

W. F. Hadlock 

Capodanno & Albano 

C. A. Donovan 

Elliott W. Keyes 

Hayden 

Newton Ice Co 

Geo. J. Barker Lumber Co. 
Jones, McDuffee & Stratton 

George C. Folsom 

Allerli 

Houghton. Gorney Co. 



30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
31 
32 



"SO^rO 



LASELL LEAVES 





WHICH 

A play of two acts. Characters: An Old 
Lasell Girl; First New Girl; Second New 
Girl. Time, third day of Fall Term. 

ACT FIRST 

Scene, main corridor of Cushman Hall. 
An old girl leisurely walking down the cor- 
ridor, spies a new girl, sitting on the settee 
farther up in the hall, looking dejected and 
homesick. She decided to speak to her and 
cheer her up. Going up to the settee, she 
sits down and says : 

"Hello. How is everything going with 



you 



?" 



New Girl: "Hello. All right." 

Old Girl: "That's good. It's lucky you 
have no conflicts." 

New Girl: "Yes." 

Old Girl : ( Aside) How can I get her to 
talk? (Aloud) "How do you like Lasell? 

New Girl: "All right I guess." 

Old Girl: "Where do you room?" 

New Girl: "Here." 

Old Girl :( Aside) Wonder if she means 
here in the hall. 

(Aloud, getting slightly provoked) "Mind 
telling me the number?" 

New Girl: "109." 



Old Girl: "What? 109? It's a dandy 
room. Don't you love it?" 

New Girl: "Yes, I suppose." 

Old Girl: "Who's your room-mate?" 

New Girl: "Sarah Jane Harrison." 

Old Girl: "Honest? She's the dearest- 
girl, isn't she?" 

New Girl: "Yes, I guess." 

Old Girl: "She surely is." (Then a little 
sarcastically) "Maybee you'll find out for 
certain this year. Where do you live?" 

New Girl: "Illinois." 

Old Girl: "Illinois is a pretty large state 
What city? 

New Girl: "I don't live in a city. It's 
a small town." 

Old Girl: (Sarcastically) "Would you 
mind telling me the name of the place?" 

New Girl: "No, it's Fielding." 

Old Girl: "I know where it is but have 
never been there." 

New Girl: "Yes." 

Old Girl: (Becoming desperate but decid- 
ing on one more attempt to get her to talk.) 
"What are you going to take this year? 
Can you make 'junior?' 

New Gir. : "Why, I don't know, I'm not 
settled. I've been to all my teachers to see 
about my classes, but none of them told me 



6 



LASELL LEAVES 



what time to come to class, and that's what 
I'm worried about." 

Old Girl: (Aside) "Well! What's the use. 
(She rises and walks away.) 
ACT SECOND 

Scene, Senior's sitting-room. Time, same 
day. Second new girl is drinking at the 
'bubble." 

Same old girl coming from German sees 
the new girl, stops, and is about to talk to 
her when she looks up, laughs and says: 

Second New Girl: "Hello Hon! Are you 
a senior? Are we allowed in 70? (Without 
waiting for an answer.) You know, my dear, 
some of the girls said only seniors were al- 
lowed in here, unless a senior asked you in, 
but I just had to have a drink, I'm so thirsty, 
and 'twould be such a nuisance to run down- 
stairs for it, so I just came here. I can see 
you don't blame me. You'll forgive me, this 
time, won't you?" (A deep breath.) 

Old Girl: "Yes, I'm a senior and I guess 
there is no particular rule against your 
being here. You surely " 

Second New Girl: "Oh, I'm so relieved! 
I'd hate to get in wrong, so soon. Where do 
you live? You know I live in Dakota, 
North Dakota at that. You know it was 
pretty far, to come away to school here in 
Boston. But I told everyone at home I 
knew they would be glad to get rid of me. 
Ha! Ha! Of course they aren't, because 
every letter they tell me how much they 
miss me. I do so love to be missed, don't 



just got to be good friends this year. My 
name's Frances Carew, what's yours? (Actu- 
ally waiting for an answer.) 

Old Girl: "Louise Dickonson". 

Second New Girl: "How mar-ve-lous! I 
simply love the name of Louise. Where — 
(the old girl getting tired of the ceaseless 
prattle starts out of the room) are you going 
dear? Please, don't leave me so soon when 
I am just getting to know you. Where do 
you live here?" 

Old Girl : ( Half way down the hall.) "Sen- 
ior House." 

Second New Girl: "Oh, how lovely. Well, 
if you must go, Hon, goodbye. I'll come see 
you as soon as I get a chance." Rose Baer 



you ; 



Out of breath. 



Old Girl: "Yes. You are- 



Second New Girl: "So do I. I would 
much rather be the one to leave home than 
to stay, wouldn't you? Oh, I know you would 
without your answering. I live, as I was 
saying in far-away North Dakota. There 
was a girl here seven years ago from home. 
Gladys Jones. Happen to know her? She's 
such a wonder. They have loads of money 
and she dresses stunningly. Isn't it funny, 
Hon, here I don't even know your name and 
I feel like I had known you all my life. We've 



THE BIRTHDAY NECKLACE 

The diamonds glimmered and shone as 
the necklace lay in Cynthia's hand. "How 
lovely of father to give it to me!" she said. 
"It is so beautiful. The very best birthday 
present that a girl could receive." With 
one last admiring look she placed it carefully 
in its little velvet lined case, and slipped it 
into her desk drawer. For an instant she 
wished she had a key, but she laughed the 
idea away, for who, she thought, would take 
it? 

The next morning while dressing for her 
daily drive, she decided to take one peep at 
her beloved necklace. She went to the 
desk, opened the drawer, and searched for 
the little case, but in vain. 

"Oh! where has it gone? I surely put it 
there yesterday. Let me think, Jane swept 
my room yesterday." 

As she hurried down the hall to her mother's 
room she tried to dismiss any thought of 
Jane's guilt, for she had always been honest. 
Bursting into the room she told her mother 
of her loss. 

"It must be somewhere in your room, 
Cynthia. I will help you find it," repli 
the mother. 

They searched and searched in every no 
and corner, only to be disappointed. Bo 



LASELL LEAVES 



7 



of them named over the servants, but shook 
their heads guiltily for even thinking of 
accusing them. Where has it gone? That 
was the mystery to solve. 

Cynthia's four year old sister was ques- 
tioned, but she solemnly shook her head and 
said that she did not know where the necklace 
was. When some one suggested burglars 
however, she fearfully declared that she had 
heard a noise in the night. But there was no 
sign of any attempt to break into the room. 

A week passed, and still the search was 
fruitless. One night after another useless 
hunt, Cynthia went to bed tired and dis- 
couraged. She saw again the glistening and 
brilliant necklace as it had lain in her hand. 
She fell to sleep, still thinking of her beautiful 
lost diamonds. 

The next morning she astonished everyone 
by running into the breakfast room saying, 
"I know where it is." The family in one 
voice asked, 'Where?" and, "How did you 
find out?" 

"Perhaps it is silly, but I can't help be- 
lieving that I am right," replied Cynthia. 
"Listen! Last night I dreamed that I was 
walking beside a little brook that flows 
through the meadow, when I happened to 
glance into its clear waters and saw my 
necklace lying there. I don't know but what 
it is useless, but I am going down to the brook 
right away before breakfast and look." 

They laughed at her as she hurried away, 
wishing her success. The small sister volun- 
teered to go too, and hand in hand they 
reached the brook. They followed its shining 
course all through the meadow with no signs 
of the necklace. Cynthia announced her 
intention of returning homeward, thinking 
herself very foolish to believe in such a dream, 
but her small sister pulled at her hand, and 
timidly suggested that it might be in the 
brook a little farther up. Cynthia went 
on with little hope of finding her diamonds, 
but when they reached the place where the 
little brook turned to flow through the grove, 
Cynthia gave a surprised and joyful cry and 



bounded forward. Did her eyes deceive 
her? No, for there it lay in all its splendor, 
the lost necklace. Cynthia seized her small 
sister, and entirely forgetting her dignified 
age of twenty-two, ran as fast as she could 
to tell the joyful news. 

Everybody rejoiced, especially the small 
sister. "How did it get there?" The little 
girl, who had been the most joyful one of 
all, now stood with downcast eyes, her little 
face showing great uneasiness. It took 
very little questioning to bring forth her 
full sobbing confession. She and her little 
playmate had dressed up as ladies and had 
thought the necklace would be just the 
finishing touch to their costumes. Not 
realizing its value they had taken turns in 
wearing it, until one day it was lost. 

"Never mind, don't cry now, dear," said 
Cynthia, "since it is found. Only you ought 
to have told before." 

"Anyway," sobbed the little girl, 
didn't tell a lie, for I didn't know where it 



was. 



Lucile Joscelyn '15. 



A sailor has no E Z time 

When on the D P sails; 
It's R D finds aloft to climb. 

Exposed to I C gales; 
And then, in K C makes a slip, 

Or if he D Z grows, 
A tumble from the I N ship 

Is his last N D knows. 
When overboard, flo A D cries, 

With energy and vim ; 
And tho of little U C tries 

A vain S A to swim. 
But when no L P finds is near. 

Nor N E way to save, 
He then in an X S of fear 

Must C K watery grave. 
Old A J sailor seldom knows, 

But if old A G gains, 
H U of baccy cures his woes 

And grog L A's his pains. 
We N V no poor sailor's life — 

In D D has no fun; 
And, feeling P T for his wife. 

Our M T talk is done. 



8 



LASELL LEAVES 



KATHRYN 

They met at my house. Therefore, 1 
hold myself responsible for all that happened. 
Pat claims that he was the one who started 
the romance, (although he does admit that 
it had the queerest beginning of any romance 
he had ever before heard, or read about) 
and claims, furthermore, that it was I who 
caused the quarrel. But this is getting ahead 
of my story. 

Pat is my husband, and there is absolutely 
no use trying to deny that he is Irish. He 
has the Irish good nature, as well as the Irish 
temper; he looks like an Irishman, talks 
like an Irishman and acts like an Irishman. 
But his name is the most Irish thing about 
him. Patrick Ireland McCarthy is the 
full name he was burdened with. I often 
told him that McCarthy wasn't so bad; a 
worse name than Patrick could be found; but 
why any rational human being should ever 
bestow such a name as Ireland on a poor 
innocent little child was more than I could 
understand. However, I married him, Irish 
name, temper and all. But I also want to 
add, that he married me, French name, 
German stubbornness and all the rest of 
my mixture of German and French character- 
istics. Friends often ask, "What nationality 
are your two boys?" 

"Patrick Ireland McCarthy Jr. is wholly 
Irish. Karl Verdeaux McCarthy is half 
German and half French," I reply. That 
is the only way it can be arranged. However 
this is not telling my romance. 

Pat and I had opened our cabin on Lake of 
the Pines for the summer, with the idea of 
having a little peace and quiet. We managed 
to get the children, the two dogs and the cat 
up there without much trouble, considering 
the distance we had to go. Just as we were 
settled and everything was going smoothly, 
what should fall upon us like a thunderbolt, 
but a telegram! Now, I will admit that as 
a rule, telegrams are made of paper and do 
not make any noise when they chance to 
fall. But what I want to impress upon your 



minds is, that this particular telegram struck 
us as if it had been a thunderbolt. It said 
no more than this, "Kathryn arriving on 
2.30 train this p. m. Isabel." 

Of course, I want everyone to understand 
that Kathryn is a dear, sweet girl and is 
really my favorite niece. The only trouble 
was that she was a bit too lively which 
slightly changed our plans for a quiet summer. 
Well, there was nothing to do but go to 
meet her. The whole family, dogs, cat, and 
I believe the canary bird, was at the station 
to meet her. As the train drew in, we saw 
Kathryn, radiant and smiling, as trim and 
stylish as ever, waiting for the train to stop 
After the usual greeting you see at a station, 
we escorted our fair young visitor to the 
motor-boat which took us swiftly across the 
bay to our island home. 

That night at dinner I remarked, "I 
am so glad you are here, Kathryn, because 
we have such a good-looking young man 
visiting the Bertrams next door, and I know 
you will like him." 

Kathryn 'laughed in her delightful way. 
"You are just the same old Auntie, aren't 
you i 

And at that, the subject of the man next 
door was dropped. 

While I was attending to my household 
duties the next morning, Pat took possession 
of Kathryn, which meant, of course, a ride 
in his beloved motor-boat. I had forgotten 
Pat, Kathryn, the children and everything, 
but the task I was doing, when I was inter- 
rupted by a morning call from Dora and 
Louise Northrop. As we were chatting, 
Dale Lodge, the Bertram's good looking 
visitor, also dropped in for a few moments. 

"Dale!" I exclaimed, "I have just the 
girl for you. She's my niece. Oh, now, 
don't get frightened at that, because she 
really is awfully pretty and attractive." 

"Good! I have been waiting for the right 
girl for a long time but no girl has quite 
come up to my ideals. She certainly must 
be a wonder though, if she is your niece." 



LASELL LEAVES 



Dale had won my heart from the first minute, 
and I know it was only his absurd flattery 
that did it. 

I began reciting all about the charms of 
my niece and had almost convinced my 
callers that she w r as the most beautiful 
person in the world, when the young lady 
in question, came bursting into the room. 
Were you ever caught, when you were a 
child, with an apple hidden behind you, 
just after you had told your mother you hadn't 
taken it from the table ■ If you ever have 
you will know exactly how I felt. Kathryn 
was simply a sight to behold. Her hair was 
disheveled from the wind and partly down 
Evidently she had tried to help Pat fix the 
engine because her dress was grease from 
neck to hem and across her face was on long 
streak of oil. At that moment, she was 
about as unattractive as any girl could be. 

"Oh, Kathryn dear," I managed to says 
"I want you to meet Mr. Lodge. This is 
my niece. You know the Northrop girls 
don't you?" 

After the introduction was over, a few 
words were said and then the Northrop 
girls said they 'must be going.' Dale, too 
effusively, so Kathryn thought, asked to 
accompany them. As soon as they had gone, 
Kathryn stated with a good deal of feeling, 
"Auntie, I despise those girls and I know I 
shall just hate that man." Of course, she didn't 
dowm deep in her heart mean it but it was 
just her way. 

( To be continued '.) 



In a certain remote town in one of the New 
England states there is a school which keeps 
a Baer, a Beaver, some Cranes and a Par- 
tridge. Behind strong Gates of Wood in the 
Hall they strain their chains until the Bakers 
send them cakes, made of Korn, Rice and a 
Bean or two. If the Link(s) should break, 
the Baer would give the others a lively Chase, 
and eat them in a Trice. 



KEEP YOUR FAITH 

You remember at the dawning 
How the sun lit up the day sky — 

How at first the light was mellow, 
Then it crimsoned, flaming high; 

You have seen the daylight broaden, 

All the dewy world enfold, — 
Banish ev'ry lurking shadow, 

Leaving naught but joyous gold; 

You have seen the gorgeous sun-set 
Melt to dusk and fade from sight; 

You have felt the earth grow silent. 
Shrouded all in silver light; ^Jj 

You have seen the twilight deepen 
Watched the gleaming stars come out. 

All the world a twinkling darkness, 
Yet in moonlight wrapped about; 

You have looked upon these wonders. 

Yet you doubt the pow'r of God, 
For your mortal eyes see nothing 

But where mortal foot has trod. 

You are proud in worldly knowledge, 

Yet you cannot understand 
How this wondrous world of beauty 

Was created by God's hand. 

For God's mighty works are secret 

And we cannot question why; 
We can only do our duty, 

And in His great love rely; 

And these mystic gifts of nature 

Are but proof of that great love: 
"Keep your faith," they seem to whisper, 
"For God watches from above." 

Margaret Alien 




hOGfthS 




LASELL'S ATHLETICS 

This year promises to be a banner one for 
Athletics in Lasell for besides splendid mater- 
ial found in the old girls, a great many 
"athletes" have been discovered among the 
new girls. Then, too, in addition to center- 
ball, basket-ball, canoeing, tennis, and track, 
field hockey and out door basket ball are 
being played. These games give opportun- 
ity to more girls and are proving very popular. 

In order to promote competition and to 
place school spirit upon a fair basis, a divi- 
sion of the girls into two groups will soon be 
made. A schedule of points for each game, 
and a trophy will be put up for the division 
winning the greatest number of points. Al- 
though this plan is new for Lasell, it has been 
successful elsewhere, and with cooperation we 
hope to find it a good one here. 

The Lasell Athletic Association welcomes 
the new girls and with their help it plans to 
reach a level which before has only been hoped 
for. 



OLD GIRLS DANCE TO THE NEW 

Saturday night, October 3, the Old Girls 
gave the New Girls a dance in the gymnasium. 
The music was furnished by a two piece 
orchestra, which "sure could play." The 
program consisted of ten regular dances, 
besides three extras. 

Everyone looked her happiest and best 
and enjoyed the dance immensely. The New 
Girls heartily appreciated the pleasant 
evening thus arranged by the Old Girls. 



Mrs. Miller, from Filene's store gave us a 
very interesting talk Thursday afternoon, 
October 8, on "Clothes and the Budget." 
She especially discussed the plan of clothing 
oneself on two hundred and fifty dollars a 
year. The new girls will find the printed 
"Budget," given to each one, a very great 
help. 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



SENIORS ANNOUNCE THEIR CLASS 
OFFICERS 

After dinner Friday night, October 2, as 
usual the girls gathered in the gymnasium 
to dance until seven-thirty. After a dance 
or two all were surprised to hear a cow-bell 
being violently rung in Carter Hall. They 
were still more surprised to see "little Ethel 
Murray" run into the gym garbed as a small 
boy, shouting, "Seniors, Seniors." Her class- 
mates responded and formed in a snake line. 
With Ethel at the head of the procession, 
they led the rest of the girls a merry chase 
through the halls and finally out on the cam- 
pus before a fire, near Carter Hall. All the 
time as they ran they sang persistently: 

"Cheer, cheer, listen here 
The Seniors are calling 
The Seniors are calling 
Cheer, cheer, listen here 
Follow the Seniors now. 

Circling around the fire they announced 
their new officers: president, Nellie Wood- 
ward; vice-president, Florence Evans; sec- 
retary, Bess Emerine; treasurer, Maude 
Wetherbee; cheer leader, Helen Benson. 
When the gym was again reached, cheers 
and congratulations were given to all the 
new officers, and "three times three" to little 
Murray. 



TRIP TO HISTORIC CHARLESTOWN 

Monday morning October 4, fifty-seven of 
the girls, with Miss Rand and Mr. Ordway as 
escorts, visited Bunker Hill and the Navy 





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Yard. They saw many interesting statues and 
admired especially that of Col. Prescott who 
fortified the hill on the memorable night of 
June 16, 1775. Nearly all the girls climbed 
the two hundred and ninety-five steps of the 
great shaft which marks the place of the battle 
of Bunker Hill. The wonderful view of the 
harbor and of the city and its surroundings 
well repaid them for this long climb. 

At the Navy Yard the party was fortunate 
enough to have a chance to go on board the 
Nebraska. Officer Hoyt took them all through 
the ship and courteously explained many 
things of interest even to the setting up of 
the tables and the methods of cooking the 
endless piles of potatoes and other vegetables. 

A visit to the frigate Constitution or "Old 
Ironsides" was another important feature of 
this altogether instructive and plesasnt trip. 




Sunday night, October 4, Dr. Francis 
Clark, President of the Union of Christian 
Endeavorers gave us a very suggestive talk, 
telling us about a number of college Christian 
Endeavor Societies and urging each girl to 
prepare herself for some future work. Marion 
Newland sang. 

October 6, the Christian Endeavor meeting 
was led by the Senior President, Nell Wood- 
ward. Her subject was "Peace" and her 
talk made many a girl think. 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



VAUDEVILLE SHOW 



Saturday night, September 26, the students 
enjoyed a frolic in the form of a vaudeville 
show in the gymnasium. The "show" started 
with an overture by the orchestra. Miss 
Helen Benson dressed in the latest Parisian 
fad for conductors very ably led the skilled 
artists whose music so delighted the girls 
that several encores were demanded. Next 
Tetrazzini, alias Florence Evans, gayly at- 
tired in a stunning robe of orange, and black, 
appeared and so thrilled her audience that 
she was requested by the Faculty to sing ( ?) 
again. Large quantities of choice and rare 
flowers were sent to her. Margaret King 
and her assistant, "Pat," the famous magicians 
were next on the program. The tricks they 
performed have left the girls so mystified 
that they are still wondering how such mar- 
vels were accomplished. Ten girls were then 
blindfolded and kept the "gym" in a roar 
with their attempts to dance the Virginia 
Reel. The final number was a Paul Jones 
in which the whole school participated. 

For this jolly evening, both new and old 
girls send their entertainers a hearty "Thank 
you." 

On September 27, Dr. William Hunting- 
ton, Ex-President of the Boston University 
spoke to us very impressively at Vesper 
Services from the words "The mountains 
shall bring peace." Mr. and Mrs. Spaulding 
of the Auburndale Methodist Church sang. 

Our first Christian Endeavor meeting was 
held September 29. Miss Potter led . Her 
talk was full of helpful suggestions for us all. 

Thursday afternoon, October first, Mrs. 
Loomis, who was formerly a member of the 
Lasell Faculty, gave us a very interesting 
talk on "The Ethics of the Table," which the 
girls greatly appreciated. 

Dr. Leon H. Vincent gave us great pleasure 

last Thursday evening when he lectured on 

'Nathaniel Hawthorne." Dr. Vincent is one 

of Lasell 's best friends. We all hope to hear 

him again very soon. 




SCHOOL 

Allen, Katharine F. 
Allen, K. Margaret 
Anderson, Ruth 
Apfelbaum, Irene R. 
Attwill, Orissa M. 
Aust, Dorothy L. 
Babcock, Edith 
Baer, Rose L. 
Baker, Florence E. 
Baker, Gertrude M. 
Ball, Irene C. 
Bauman, Helen L. 
Bauman, Margrethe M. 
Beach, Beatrice B. 
Beach, Elizabeth S. 
Beach, Marian 
Beaver, Edna M. 
Belt, Marguerite 
Benson, Helen L. 
Berkey, Wilda I. 
Bickford, Jacquelyn T. 
Bingaman, Katherine G 
Boehner, Ruth L. 
Bothwell, Eleanor L. 
Bowman, M. Katherine 
Boyd, Frances M. 
Bradley,. Isabel E. 
Bradley, Naomi S. 
Brate, Dorothv 
Brix, Myrtle A. 
Brooks, Helen E. 
Burnap, Ruth M. 
Canfield, Mary E. 
Carter, Catherine G. 
Chase, Kathryn E. 
Christensen, Edna C. 
Clark, Louise A. 
Clarke, Katherine L. 
Cloake, Mildred P. 
Collins, Marjorie B. 
Cornwall, Anna L. 
Crane, Dorothy 
Crane, Helen M. 
Cutting. Marion 



ROOSTER 

Joliet, 111. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Holyoke Mass'. 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Columbus, O. 
Maiden, Mass. 
Lehighton, Pa. 
Edgewood, R. I. 
Johnson, Vt. 
Massena, N. V. 
Grayling, Mich. 
Grayling, Mich. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
New Milford, Conn. 
Norwood, Mass. 
Auburn, Maine 
Tower, Minn. 
Claremont, N. H. 
Newport News, Ya. 
Plainfield, N. J. 
Malvern, la. 
East Angus, Que. 
Woburn, Mass. 
New York, N. Y. 
Boliver, N. Y. 
Boliver, N. Y. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Portland, Ore. 
South Berwick, Me. 
Whitinsville, Mass. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Cleveland. O. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Chicago, 111. 
Albion, N. Y. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Melrose, Mass. 
Sparrow's Point, Md. 
Roselle Park, N. J. 
Fort Wavne, Ind. 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



Dana, Gertrude 
Day. Miriam C. 
Dearborn, Katherine L. 
Dickey, Hallie J. 
Doleman, Elsie L. 
Dunham, Evelyn H. 
Edwards, Edna A. 
Emerine. Bess E. 
Evans, Florence M. 
Farley, Grace A. 
Fera, A. Lavinia 
Ferguson, Veda 
Foster, Helen J. 
Frankel, Emelia K. 
Frauenthal, Gladys T. 
Freeman, Maude L. 
Frey, Harriet M. 
Garnsey, M. Adolphia 
Gates, Florence 
Gaty, Cornelia V. 
Gerrett, Helen S. 
Gratz, Merbvelle M. 
Greenwood, Naomi 
Griffin, Marion M. 
Griffin, Ruth E. 
Hadley, Dorothy F. 
Hale, Laura S. 
Hall, Marguerite 
Hallock, Florence L. 
Hammond, Sarah M. 
Hardwick, Helen 
Hardwick, Katherine 
Hardy, Helen N. 
Harris, Frances M. 
Harris, Ruth 
Harvey, Nellie L. 
Haskell, Phoebe 
Hauck, Lena M. 
Hauslein, Florence H. 
Hayden, Maude J. 
Henderson, Maude O. 
Henning, Margaretha 
Hibner, Eugenia E. 
Higgins, Madeleine I. 
Hildreth, Elizabeth F. 
Hoag, Katherine A. 
Hodges, Edith F. 
Hopkins, Emily C. 
Hotchkiss, Anita D. 
Houghton, H. Marie 
Irvine, Lael D. 
Jackson, Hilda L. 
Johnsen, Frances L. 
Johnson, Malvina E. 
Jones, Margaret V. 
Joscelyn, F. Lucile 
King, Margaret V. 
Klenze, Marie H. 
Kolb, Marie E. 
Korn, Gertrude 
Krueger, Viola C. 
Lang, Frances O. 
Lang, Phyllis, H. 
Laubenstein, Ida R. 
Lawton, Lillian S. 
Lerch, Marian A. 
Levy, Frances J. 
Lewis, Jessie H. 
Libby, Mildred B. 
Linke, Gertrude S. 



Roxbury, Mass. 
Melrose, Mass. 
Nashua, N. H. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Greenwood, Mass. 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
Sour Lake, Tex. 
Fostoria, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Sedalia, Mo. 
Chicago, 111. 
Bozeman, Mont. 
Newport, Vt. 
Hopkinsville, Ky. 
Conway, Ark. 
Chelsea, Mass. 
Utica, N. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Morristown, N. J. 
Greenfield, Mass. 
New York, N. Y. 
Muir, Mich, 
N. Bloomfield, Conn. 
Onset, Mass. 
Lawrence, Mass. 
S. Glastonbury, Conn. 
Holliston, Mass. 
Amsterdam, N. Y. 
Rockville, Conn. 
Maiden, Mass. 
Maiden, Mass. 
Adrian, Mich. 
Rumford, Maine 
New York, N. Y. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Beverly, Mass. 
Portsmouth, O. 
Northampton, Mass. 
Dorchester, Mass 
Dover, N. H. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Du Bois, Pa. 
Haverhill, Mass. 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
Ogden, Utah 
Oneida, N. Y. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
Seymour, Conn. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 
Provo, Utah 
Flint, Mich. 
Providence, R. 1. 
Winthrop, Mass. 
Utica, N. Y. 
Newport, Vt. 
Warren, O. 
Davenport, la. 
Bay City, Mich. 
Davenport, la. 
Newark, N. J. 
Waverly, N. Y. 
Waverly, N. Y. 
Ashland, Pa. 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
Columbus, O. 
Columbus, O. 
Portland, Maine 
Gorham, N. H. 
New Britain, Conn. 



Lord, Dorice M. 
Lucas, Edna A. 
MacGregor, Ruth A. 
MacMillan, Norma C. 
Margolis, Olive 
Marx, Bernice L. 
Mathias, Dorothy 
McCarty, Eleanor LeP. 
McLellan, Hazel 
Merrill, Helen M. 
Moebs, Helen E. 
Moore, Mary F. 
Morris, Florence H. 
Morrison, Marjorie 
Moss, Katherine A. 
Murray, Ethel E. 
Newland. Marion H. 
Nichols, Helen 
Nichols, Lois A. 
Ordway, Mildred A. 
Overholser, Helen 
Palmer, Carita L. 
Palmer, Hazel L. 
Partridge, Mildred C. 
Patterson, Ada F. 
Peck, Vilette M. 
Peterson, Edna B. 
Powell, Margaret B. 
Prentiss, Katherine C. 
Rankin, Gladys B. 
Ray, Pauline B. 
Rice, Carol M. 
Richards, Elizabeth G. 
Risser, Constance K. 
Rogers, Lenette M. 
Rosenberg, Frances D. 
Saxton, Marie J. 
Schooley, Helen D. 
Schumann, Martha C. 
Sheldon, Madeline R. 
Shepherd, Jessie C. 
Shuttleworth, Beatrice M. 
Slade, Marguerite A. 
Smith, Cecelia 
Smith, Dorothy B. 
Smith, Maud F. 
Snedeker, Helen 
Stiles, Elizabeth 
Strain, Mildred A. 
Straker, Mabel E. 
Stronach, Annie E. 
Sweet, Alma E. 
Thorp, Katherine 
Tiflany, Susan E. 
Torbert, Dorothy E. 
Trice, Margaret L. 
Waller, Doris R. 
Webb, Ruth A. 
Wetherbee, Maude T. 
Whipple, Dale M. 
Whiting, Charlotte A. 
Wilkes, Gladys 
Willis, Pauline E. 
Willis, Vera 
Winslow, Ruth C. 
Wood, Anna G. 
Woodward, Nellie E. 
Wright, Frances E. 
Youtz, Jean P. 
Zach, Hala A. 



Lawrence, Mass. 
Johnstown, N. Y. 
Rumford, Maine 
Glen Park, N. Y. 
Dayton, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Joliet, 111. 
Corning, N. Y. 
Barton, Vt. 
Enosburg Falls, Vt. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Columbus, O. 
Oneonta, N. Y. 

Melrose, Mass. 
Newton, Mass. 
San Saba, Tex. 
Newport, Vt. 
Greenfield, Mass. 
East Arlington, Vt. 
Orleans, Vt. 
Claremont, Cal. 
McLean, 111. 
Oneonta, N. Y. 
Arlington Hreights- 
Ashland, O. 
Norwich, Conn. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Fort Worth, Tex. 
Johnson, Vt. 
Woonsocket, R. I. 
Somerville, Mass. 
Indianapolis. Ind. 
Fort Fairfield, Me.. 
Kankakee, 111. 
S. Carver, Mass. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Oneonta, N. Y. 
Wyoming, Pa. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Middletown, Dela. 
Amsterdam, N. Y. 
Providence, R. I. 
Marion, Ind. 
White R'r June, Vt. 
Glen Park, N. Y. 
Plantsville, Conn. 
Gardner, Mass. 
Easthampton, Mass. 
Attleboro, Mass. 
Pittsfied, Mass. 
Milford, Mass. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 
Blandford, Mass. 
Port Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 
Shortsville, N. Y. 
Lyndonville, Vt. 
Orleans, Vt. 
South Sudbury, Mass- 
Dallas, Tex. 
Brockton, Mass. 
Gorham, N. H. 
Nashua, N. H. 
Wayne, Pa. 
Boston, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Galicia, Austria 



PensonftL 




Since the last issue of our "Leaves," Lasell 
wedding bells have been ringing almost un- 
interruptedly. It is our pleasure to announce 
the following marriages. 

On Thursday, June 4, occurred the mar- 
riage of Helen Bigelow Marshall to Mr. 
Harold Albert Allen at Worcester, Mass. 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen are at home at Forest 
Hill St., Worcester. 

June 6, Edith Houghton, '09 became Mrs. 
Henry Leander Heckert at Red Oak, la. 
Mr. and Mrs. Heckert are at home at 711 
Washington Ave., Red Oak. la. 

The marriage of Mabel Harriet Goodwin, 
'02, to the Rev. William Carlos Prentiss 
occurred on Wednesday, June 10, at East 
Hartford, Conn. Mr. and Mrs. Prentiss 
will be at home Wednesday in November 
at 19 Clinton Ave., New Haven, Conn. 



On the 16th of June, Marion Louise Hale, 
'10, became Mrs. Edward Phillips B-ottomley 
at South Glastonbury, Conn. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bottomley's new address Enfield, N. H. 

Elizabeth Bronson Brandow, '11, and 
Mr. Horace Niles Trumbull married on Wed- 
nesday, June 17, at Albany, N. Y. Mr. 
and Mrs. Trumbull at home at 107 First 
St., Scotia, N. Y. 

On Tuesday, June the 30th, occurred the 
marriage of Ruth Lucille Farmer to Mr. 
Aubrey Donald David at Gouverneur, N. Y. 
Helen Mead Beaty l became Mrs. William 
Frederick Dalzell at.Warren, Pa., on June 
30. Mr. and Mrs. Dalzell are^at home at 
Moundsville, W. Va. 

On July 6, occurred the marriage of 
Katherine May Vinton to Mr. Frank Palmer 
Speare. After November 1st, Mr. and Mrs. 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



Speare will be at home at 179 Babcock St., 
Brookline. 

August 6, at six o'clock, occurred the mar- 
riage of Margaret Gregson and Mr. Walter 
R. Barker of Morgan Park, 111. Helen Cor- 
bin, an old Lasell girl, was the maid of honor. 
Mr. and Mrs. Barker are at home at Long- 
wood Drive, Morgan Park. 

The wedding of Wilhelmina Joscelyn, '13, 
and Mr. Floyd A. Swett occurred July 29 
at Newport, Vt. Ruth Bachelder, '12, was 
one of the guests. Mr. and Mrs. Swett are 
now living in West Derby, Vt. 

Almira C. Pitblado became Mrs. Gerald 
Lyman Warner on Saturday, August 15, 
at Winnipeg, Man. 

On Tuesday evening, September 1, Bessie 
Rose Brown became Mrs. Meredith R. Carb, 
at Forth Worth, Tex. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Payne announce the 
marriage of their daughter, Dorothy Pattison, 
'14, to Mr. Philip John Whiteway, on Wed- 
nesday, Sept. 20. Mr. and Mrs. Whiteway 
will be at home after the 1st of November, 
at 4816 Old York Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lasell's hearty congratulations to this 
happy company. 

We are not at all surprised to receive the 
announcement of the engagement of Mildred 
E. Koch, '13, to Mr. Harold R. Kaufmann, 
but were pleasantly surprised over the cards 
announcing the engagement of Rosalie M. 
Seinsheimer, '12, to Mr. Norvin J. Heldman. 

Mary Lumbard, '10, following the good 
example of her classmates, announces her 
engagement to Mr. Elbert Martin Burnett. 
Our hearty congratulations to these young 
folk! 

The stork has had a busy summer, visiting 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gilbert 
Beers ( Bernice Lincoln, '12) where he left 
little Barbara Beers on May 28; on June 28 
Virginia Washburn Peyser was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry W. Peyser (Katharine 
Washburn, '06) ; on July 16, James Warner 
Allyn came to gladden the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. A. W. Allyn (Annie Mae Pinkham, '02) ; 



and Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett Brooks (Anna 
Nash) welcomed little Willard Nash Brooks 
on July 21. 

Through the courtesy of May Florine Thie- 
leus Peeples, an interesting account of the wed- 
ding of Bessie Louise Thielens to Mr. Thomas 
Scott Miller of Washington, la., was received. 
Mr. Miller is a graduate of the Chicago 
University and Bessie will make her home in 
Chicago. One of the unique features of the 
wedding was the singing of appropriate 
selections by May Florine. 

Dr. Bragdon is always finding out the 
latest and best news concerning Lasell girls. 
This time he sends a most attractive circular 
of a school at Hotel Maryland, Pasadena, 
Calif., which teaches the famous Montessori 
method with Mildred Johnston, '06, as 
Director. We will leave the editor of our 
alumnae supplement to complete the story. 

Clara Trowbridge, '12, now a junior at 
Wellesley College, was kind enough to give 
us an old-fashioned call recently. The most 
interesting bit of news which she brought 
was that her sister Ruth, '13, was charge of 
the sewing in an Episcopal school at Saratoga 
Springs, N. Y. We are proud of our successful 
teacher. 

We have in our editorial office a most 
valuable and interesting article entitled "Im- 
pressions Received from Different Viewpoints" 
which is really an account of our Mrs. Mar- 
tin's experiences in the war one. Mrs. 
Martin was of the Bessie Shepherd, '94 
party, as was also our principal emeritus, 
Doctor Bragdon. Mrs. Martin wrote in a 
moment of inspiration, as you may gather 
from the following paragraph : 

"Arriving at Brigue we beheld in the glow 
of the sunset this most beautiful of all the 
beautiful valleys of the Rhone. The Alps 
rise abruptly from the valley and river to the 
skies, slanting just enough to allow vegeta- 
tion. Flowers of every color of the rainbow 
grow in banks along the mountain-side 
wherever it is not covered with vines, fruit 
trees and garden patches. The sunset turned 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



the glacier-capped mountains into a rose- 
colored blaze of light, while the vari-colored 
flowers, the smiling valley and the rapidly 
running Rhone, together with immense tor- 
rents that caught the light of the sun, dashing 
down the cliffs, make a picture beyond the 
power of words to describe." 

Announcement has been received of the 
engagement of Christine Charles to a Cin- 
cinnati man. 

We hear that Geraldine Merchant is taking 
a business course this year. 

Josephine Edgerton of St. Paul, Minn., 
who was here in 1911, is teaching for charity 
in St. Paul, while Dorothy Beacom, Joseph- 
ine's Lasell chum and roommate, is doing 
the samework in Greensburg, Pa. 

We are very happy in having Elsie Dole- 
man, '14, and Marie Klenze, '14, with us 
this year as post graduates. 

Gratia deZouche is teaching Sunday School 
in her home town. 

Charlotte Swartwout, '14, is taking vocal 
lessons in New York. 

Lena Vee Kelley, '14, is taking a course at 
Pratt Institute this year. 

Dorothy Canfield, '14, is now at her home 
on Los Angeles, Caiif., but we are glad to 
say she expects to visit Lasell in March. 

Evelyn Schmidt, '14, and Eunice Votaw, 
'14, are attending Art school in Boston. 

Lois Brader, '14, Ruth Cammack, '14, 
and Clara MacDonald, '14, are studying 
at the New England Concervatory of Music 
Boston. 

We hear that Angeline Emery, '14, is 
taking two courses in advanced cooking 
at Albany State College this year. 

Lillian Schwartz, '14, is in the sophomore 
class at the University of Cincinnati. 

Hazel Harris, '14, is teaching music at 
Barton University, Barton, Vt. 

We have just received cards announcing 
the arrival of little Wells Case Dennison on 
Sept. 25, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
S. Dennison ( Carol Maude Case, '99) . We 
extend our congratulations. 



Word has come of the marriage of Aline 
McCormick to Mr. Robert Harris early in 
the summer. 

We were glad to receive a call from Ruth 
Bachelder, '12, recently. Ruth is teaching 
sewing and is head of her department in 
Concord, Mass., and so is a near neighbor 
this year. We shall hope to see her often 
at Lasell. 

Alice Andreesen Kountze, '95, made a 
very welcome call at Lasell early in Septem- 
ber. Alice had just brought her son East 
to attend the Fessenden School in West 
Newton. 

Mary Lulie Hogg, '88, daughter of the late 
Prof. Alexander Hogg, one of Lasell's most 
esteemed and honored friends, is spending 
the winter in Auburndale. One of her prin- 
cipal errands to New England was to place 
under the care of her Alma Mater her niece, 
Margaret Powell, daughter of Julia Ellen 
Hogg Powell, '94. Miss Hogg also has with 
her Margaret's little brother who is attending 
the Auburndale school. It is a great pleasure 
to Lasell folk to have this "old girl" in the 
neighborhood. 

In her friendly message to Doctor Winslow, 
after confessing a wave of homesickness, 
Mary Quick, '14, tells of a delightful summer, 
much of it having been spent with old Lasell 
girls, Ruth Thresher, '14, and Maria Riker, 
'09, being her hostesses. She speaks fo 
having met Florence Evans, Sophie Mayer, 
'08, and Lillian Schwartz, '14. By the way, 
we wish Mary would write up an account of 
her automobile trip while in Kentucky and 
explain the unique decorations of the car. 

On the opening day of school, Barbara 
Jones, '14, sent this telegram to our Principal 
"This is my wish for dear old Lasell. That 
the new year may bring to you all good for- 
tune and prosperity. You deserve all that 
may come and I wish with all my heart I 
were there to help in the work and share the 
reward." A very kind and thoughtful act 
on the part of Barbara which was greatly 
appreciated. 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



Laura Weaver, '05, along with best wishes 
for Lasell, sends on time her year's subscrip- 
tion for the Leaves. But the most important 
and interesting part of Laura's message is 
the announcement of her marriage June 22 
to Mr. Norman Geer Buxton, Johnstown, 
O., graduate of the Leland Stanford Jr. 
University of the class of 1895. 

Alice House '83 made a flying visit but a 
a very delightful one at Lasell in July. Alice 
still makes her home in Cincinnati and is busy 
with many worth-while activities, literary 
and philanthropic. 

"Polly" Stebbins Ingham visited Nellie 
Packard Draper this month and took dinner 
at the Seminary. Her home is now in New 
Brunswick, N. J. 

Bessie Hayward is still teaching at Peabody, 
Mass. and sees Grace Loud every week. 
Bessie is also studying the organ'and has been 
a church organist this past summer. She 
keeps up her friendship with Isabel Ginn and 
Annie Hackett. Grace and Ethel Loud were 
here in June. They are both teaching.. 

Beth Barley when at Chatanqua this sum- 
mer met Winifred Whittlesey. Bess Linn 
and Josephine Siggins. 

Annie Alexander, Daise Hartshorne Cope, 
and Pauline Collins Ham have had a visit 
with Elizabeth Warnock in California. 

Stella Wadhams and Lillian Packard spent 
a week together at Atlantic City in June. On 
a day's trip to Philadelphia, they met Tryh- 
pena Uhlrich Ludwig. She was to call on 
Marie Biddle Keeln that day. 

Dorothy Bushnell, '14, is not allowing her 
homesickness for Lasell to prevent her doing 
some splendid work. Among other things 
she is teaching music and domestic science 
in the town of Crooksville, Ohio, and is 
trying for a four-year state certificate which 
when it expires entitles her to a "life certi- 
ficate." She has full charge of the music, 
cooking and sewing, and although one of 
the busiest of teachers she has time for a 
Sunday school class of twelve little girls, 



and is talking, if you please, of teaching in 
a night school. She certainly has a full 
program. We congratulate both teacher 
and pupils. 

We miss Sara Lane this fall but find she 
is a woman of affairs. She has entered a 
business career but is not too busy to send 
a friendly and appreciative message back 
to her school home. 

We have not yet been reconciled to the 
absence of Ina Rowe, and although we are 
"wishing her back" we do extend our best 
wishes for her "home keeping" program. 

Ruth Hall sends a delightful description 
of a tour through the Berkshire Hills which 
she describes as the Switzerland of America. 
She is planning some musical work in Boston 
this winter, and we are certainly hoping to 
see her often at Lasell. Miss Potter speaks 
with enthusiasm of Ruth as a traveling 
companion. She was in the Lasell European 
party during the past summer. 

Eunice Votaw, '14, came "back home" 
to Lasell this fall, bringing with her one of 
our nicest new girls, Edna Edwards. Eunice 
declared herself happy to be again at Lasell 
and we certainly were glad to have her with 
us. 

Florence Linke and Hope Richards both 
returned this fall, chaperoning their "little" 
sisters. We were glad to see these dear "old 
girls," and also to welcome the new members 
of their families. 

Phoebe Hallock took time in the midst 
of her busy home-fall-opening to send a 
friendly word to the school and we are hoping 
to see her later. 

Among the most helpful girls on the re- 
ceiving line during the opening days were 
Mabelle Whitney, '03, and Sophie Wendt. 
We greatly appreciated their coming back 
to assist us in welcoming the new girls. 

Anne Wallace thought of us during the 
opening week and missed us and was kind 
enough to send a loyal, loving line. She, too, 
hopes to visit Lasell during the year and we 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



shall be glad to welcome her. She speaks 
of a promised visit from Helen Latimer. 

Grace Douglass Murray has returned 
from Spain to her native land. She and her 
husband are now guests of her mother in 
Brookline, and Grace is rejoicing over the 
coming of her little son, James Douglass, 
on September 25. Our hearty congratula- 
tions to parents and grandmother. 

Hazel Bower sends a friendly word to Miss 
Potter, who was her chaperon in Europe 
during the past summer, and wishes all 
good things for the school. We are sorry 
that she did not get nearer Lasell than New 
York. She and Abbie Hamilton (Julia's 
sister) also a member of the foreign travel 
party, have returned to their homes in Great 
Falls, Montana. Our best wishes go with them. 

Lucy E. Curtis, '80, in a recent letter 
extends her good wishes for Lasell's happy 
new year, and describes a recent missionary 
meeting where she heart Clementina Butler 
give a "wonderfully forcefull and vivid 
account of her escape from Mexico." Lucy 
has but one fault — we wish she was a little 
more neighborly. We thank her for her 
good wishes. 

We were glad to receive a friendly word 
from Amy Brannan, '10. We are finding out 
that all the good things she said about 
Kathryn Chase are true. 

As the guest of her classmate, Stella Wad- 
hams, '83, Miss Packard spent a delightful 
part of her vacation at Atlantic City. In 
a recent letter from Stella, she hints of a 
possible visit to Boston which we hope will 
be in the near future. We do not need to 
hint that Boston is one of the suburbs of 
Aubuindale, we shall count on her "Coming 
home to Lasell". 

Mabel Boyd, who by the way is head of 
one of the departments in the Y. W. C. A. 
in New York, visited Lasell this fall and 
brought with her, as one of our new girls, 
her niece, Frances Boyd. 

One of the glad surprises of the fall was 
the unexpected call from Irene Bezner, who 



was kind enough later to return, bringing 
with her Ensign Hart of the battleship 
"Nebraska." Old girls may guess the rest. 
We believe the wedding is to be in the spring. 

Among our most welcome callers (sorry 
she was not a visitor) this fall was President 
Ruby Newcomb, '14, just home from Europe, 
where, notwithstanding the war cloud, she 
had a most delightful summer. Ruby was 
the guest of Dorothy Smith who also "dropped 
in" long enough to wish Lasell Godspeed. 

Julia Potter Schmidt, '06, and her husband 
visited Lasell just before the opening of 
school. They had been motoring through 
the Berkshires and made a detour in order 
to include Lasell in their itinerary. 

We were delighted to see Elizabeth Linn, 
'13, and Mary Fenno, '13, at the opening 
dance. We had no opportunity for visiting 
but sincerely hope they are as "well and 
happy" as they look. 

Miss Witherbee is again "at home" in 
Lasell and is receiving a hearty welcome 
from our school family. 

We welcome as the new member of our 
faculty Mile. Amelie Kokoszynska, who 
comes to assist in the French department. 
This genial instructor is already winning a 
place in the hearts of teachers and pupils 
alike. 

Doctor Winslow was the guest of honor 
at the recent Chicago Lasell Club reunion. 
He was entertained in the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Goodwillie, and speaks with enthusiasm 
of Mary, '12, and Dora, '14, as housekeepers. 

Martha Keith and Gertrude Lay were 
also guests at the dance given by the old 
girls to the new. Martha is at home this 
year and Gertrude is studying music in Bos- 
ton. 

Clara MacDonald, '14, is not at Lasell, but 
a very near neighbor. Her mother, sister 
and self are to spend the winter in Mr. 
Philip Butler's home in Auburndale. Lasell 
extends a hearty welcome. 

Prof. Henry Turner Bailey and family 
have taken up their residence in Newton for 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



the winter. Our town is to be congratulated 
on the coming of this distinguished citizen 
and Lasell is especially happy to have these 
good friends as near neighbors. 

We have with us this year Lillian Lawton 
and Carita Palmer, daughters of "old girls." 
Mary Upton Lawton and AgnesAldrich Palmer 
were good enough to come with their daugh- 
ters, thus giving Lasell an opportunity to 
"welcome home" these loyal former students, 
who could not have chosen a better way to 
show their loyalty than by placing their 
daughters at Lasell. 

Ella Puchta Knight's, '10, good wishes 
for a prosperous year at Lasell were received. 
This is a beautiful custom which our graduate 
has of wishing us Godspeed at the beginning 
of each year. Also another good habit of 
hers is the sending annually of her year's 
subscription to the Leaves. We acknowledge 
gratefully her unfailing kindness. 

Miss Carrie Schafer, an old Lasell girl 
from Reading, Penn., is making an extended 
tour through the West, visiting old Lasell 
freinds. She is at present visiting Miss 
Emma Christensen in Minneapolis, Minn., 
and will visit Beth Baer, Leighton, Penn. 
in a few weeks. 

f Through Dr. Bragdon's kindness we were 
glad to see some children's songs that had 
been published, the composer being our 
Charlotte Thearle Seelcer, the words from 
"A Child's Garden of Verses," by Robert 
Louis Stevenson. / 

Dorothy Jones is teaching in a public 
school in Jamestown, N. Y. 

Gertrude Stearns called at Lasell. j She is 
keeping house for her father and has had a 
sewing class in the Y. W. C. A. 



of permanent value which Dr. Young con- 
tributed to the religious press, and one of his 
last books "The Battle of Gettysburg" is 
among the best known and most inspiring 
of his works. 

Lasell's alumnae mourn sincerely the pass- 
ing away of Mrs. Maria Warren Hayden, 
of East Hartford, Conn., which occurred 
early in the summer. Mrs. Hayden was 
graduated from Lasell in the class of 1858 
and her active interest in her Alma Mater 
has never been interrupted. She was hon- 
orary president of the Connecticut Valley 
Lasell Club and prominent in many social 
and literary circles. We shall hope that a 
fitting tribute to her will find its way into 
our school paper later. 

Our sincere sympathy is extended to the 
members of these bereaved families. 

It is with sorrow that we are called upon 
to record the death of Edith Flint Barker in 
Fall River in the late spring. We remember 
well her cherry disposition during her school 
days which she has carried through life* 
Our sympathies go out to her family. 



In the passing away of Dr. Jesse Bowman 
Young of Cincinnati, Lasell loses one of her 
staunchest friends and patrons. Dr. Young 
was the father of "Anne S. Young, '97, and 
Lucy M. Young. Ina fitting tribute which 
appeared in the Christian Advocate, reference 
is made to the large amount of literary work 




■ 










**mo 



^DITDRI?^ 1 



fl> 



Greetings and heartiest of welcomes to 
all of you new girls, to every single one of you! 
We are so glad that you happnend to choose 
Lasell for school this year instead of any other 
place, for we know you will love it just as 
dearly as the rest of us do. When we old 
girls returned this fall, it was not without 
misgivings of your being able to fill the places 
of those who were not so fortunate as to re- 
turn; and for that reason, perhaps we were 
not as genial as we might have been. But now 
even the slightest trace of any feeling of that 
kind, has vanished and not by any means 
through our efforts only. You girls have 
caught the spirit of our school life so readily, 
that we already count upon your enthusiasm 
and support. The Leaves Board especially 
dersires your cooperation in making our school 
paper one which shall represent us worthily, 
not only among our readers here but among 
our patrons outside. 

Last June, on Commencement Day, Dr. 
Winslow made the statement that the year 
1913-14 was to be considered among the best 
since he has been here. Now do you girls 
realize just what that means in the way of 
an incentive for us, to whose keeping this 
year has been largely given? To us comes a 
challenge — a hard one — to make this year 
better than the last. Shall we not accept it? 



If you have a bit of news, send it in; 

Or a joke that will amuse, send it in. 

A story that is true, 

An incident that's new, 

We want to hear from you! Send it in. 



A PLEDGE 

We "new" girls who are here 

To gain knowledge year by year, 
Must strive to work with all our will. 

To bring honor and glory to the school on the 
hill 

At first, we had a bewildered air 

But at every turn, an "old " girl fair, 

Extended to us such welcoming hand 

That we at once felt at home in this school so 
grand. 

In the morning when the rising gong resounds. 
And clangs out its message to us by pounds, 

We know we must hurry and not be late 

If we would avoid a black mark on Miss Potter's 
slate. ^^j 

Then, up the river we go gliding along, 

Dipping the paddles with laughter and song. 

Giving a cheer for Lasell so dear im 
Which echoes and echoes far and near. 

When after study hour we prepare for rest, , 

And settle down in our small nest, 
Then we give blessing to dear Lasell, 

And pledge ourselves to serve her well. 

Corwall- Haskell, 





AS WE SEE OTHERS 

The Mosaic — Your 1914 number is the best 
we have received this year. The pictures and 
write ups on athletics show that you have a fine 
time in out-of-door sports. The pictures of 
the rooms are very attractive. We hope to 
greet you again next June. 

The Iris — Your article on the Washington 
trip is well written and makes us all wish 
that we could have gone, too. Don't you 
think that your Exchange column might be a 
little longer? It seems all out of proportion 
to your joke and other departments. 

The April and May number of the Ivy 
Leaves is very good. The locals are especially 
interesting, even to those who were not with 
you during your Commencement festivities 
The headings of your departments are very 
original. 

The Missile is one of the best magazines on 
our Exchange list. Each department is com- 
plete and your cover design is neat and at- 
tractive. We hope you will visit us again 
this year. 

X-Ray — "The Greatest of These" and 
''Mary Ann" are both excellently written stor- 
ies, and the former is unusually long for a 
school paper. You evidently do not believe 
in criticizing your Exchanges, but I think 
they would appreciate it if you did. 



The editorials in the June number of K. 
H. S. Record were exceptionally well-written 
This is the first time that you have appeared 
on our Exchange table, and we hope to wel- 
come you back next June. 

The Cricket is very well arranged, and has 
an artistic cover. "Davy," in the June issue, 
is very clever. 

Advance — You have some really good jokes 
in your June number, and good jokes are 
scarce. Don't you ever criticize your Ecx- 
changes? 

John Marshall Record — Excellent literary 
nd athletic departments, and interesting 
school notes. Keep it up. 

The Commencement number of The Re- 
view (Ball H. S.) , is unusually complete and 
entertaining. The prize story, "His Puritan 
Mother," is rather unique, and holds one's 
interest to the end. 

C. H. S. Recorder — Your departments are 
well proportioned, and the editorial in the 
September issue is fine. The cuts also add 
to the interest of your paper. 

The World — "On Foot Through Glacier 
Park," in the October number, gives its 
readers a very clear idea of the trip. You 
are to be commended on your literary de- 
partment, and also on your appropriate 
cover design. 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



AS OTHERS SEE US 

Lasell Leaves — We agree with another ex- 
change, is one of the most attractive school 
magazines edited in the country. The pictures 
are unusually good. — Ivy Leaves. 

Lasell Leaves — Your exchange column is an 
exceptionally good column in an exceptionally 
good paper. — The Golden Rod. 

We find it impossible to criticize Lasell 
Leaves. You seem to live up to your motto, 
"Dux Femina Facti," for you are our best 
exchange. — The Alpha. 

Lasell Leaves — Your cuts are so interesting. 
Each department seems to be more interest- 
ing than the one preceding it. — The Recorder. 

Lasell Leaves — As usual, a "dandy" paper. 
The cuts and story of the Washington trip 
show up fine. Here's hoping you will call 
again next year. — Tech Quarterly. 

Lasell Leaves — Your magazine is as fine as 
usual. The cover of the Easter number is 
very attractive. The account of your trip 
to Washington should make every one wish 
to have a like experience. — John Marshall 
Record. 

Lasell Leaves are full budded now, and each 
petal contains such an interesting tale or 
picture that I hope you all may see it. — The 
Orange. 

Lasell Leaves — The stories in this month's 
issue are particularly good. The cuts are 
attractive and very appropraite, and your 
cover is neat. — The Aegis. 

Lasell Leaves — Your cover is very attrac- 
tive. All of the departments are well- 
written. — The Orange and Green. 

Lasell Leaves — Your stories are good and 
your departments well-arranged. — C. H. S. 
Recorder. 

Lasell Leaves — Your paper is well-arranged 
and very interesting. — Vail-Deane Budget. 



The following magazines arrived last Spring 
after our June number had gone to press: 

The Abbott Observer, Advnce, Aegis, The 
Alpha, The American University Courier, 
The Artisan, The Billows, The Blue and White. 



Boston University Beacon, The Columbian, 
The Dalhousie Gazette, Echoes, Gold and Black, 
The Goldenrod (Wayne, Neb.), The Golden- 
Rod (Quincy, Mass.), The Iris, Ivy Leaves, 
John Marshall Record, Keene Kronicle, King 
Edward's School Chronicle, Kingsfield High 
School Record, Lai Bagh Chronicle, Lawrence 
High School Bulletin, The Lit, The Mesquite, 
The Mosaic, The Oracle, The Orange, The 
Orange and Green, The Recorder (Springfield, 
Mass.), The Review, (Galveston, Texas) 
The Roman, The Student (Portsmouth, Va.) , 
Shortridge Daily Echo, The Tech Quarterly 
The Tiger, V ail, Deane Budget, Wise- Acres. 

The Lasell Leaves acknowledges with thanks 
the Fall issues of the following papers: 

The Artisan, The Black and Red Review, 

The Elgin High School Mirror, Granet and 

Gray, The Hermonite, New York Military 

Academy Bulletin, The Radiograph, The C. 

H. S. Recorder, X-Ray, The World. 



Maud Wetherly, appropos of Mrs. Loomis" 
talk about not wasting things, remarked that 
she thought something was wrong in our being 
allowed to WASTE the perfectly good moon 
of last week. 



"Dr. Godfrey, what is the use of an appen- 
dix any way?" 

"None! oh excuse me — any price you have 
for the surgeon." 



"Bernice, why haven't you got your name 
tag on?" 

"Why, Miss Potter, I haven't got a pin." 
"Well, I have my opinion of you!" 



"Nell, will you have some more dressing?" 
"Yes, please, dressing sure is my long suit!" 



Miss Goff said she had the second great 
shock of her life the other day — the first 
since the day she graduated from high 
school. 




V(^ 



7Z 



di> 



FOR ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS 

"Once a Lasell girl, always a Lasell girl" 

All articles or "bits of gossip" for the Supplement should be sent to the Supplement editor, 

Lillian M. Packard. 



MISS NUTT'S MESSAGE 

Dear Girls of Other Days: 

I am sure Miss Packard told me when she 
asked me to send you greeting to which of 
the alumnae this special number was to be 
devoted. I have forgotten and I am glad I 
have for I want to include you all in my word 
of remembrance. 

Personally I do not care so much whether 
you have distinguished yourselves in litera 
ture or art or in any department of the 
world's work as that you are making the years 
tell in the brightness you are able to bring to 
your home, in the gladness with which you 
take up the serious things of life, and in the 
way in which you prove yourselves a blessing 
to others. 

I hope you are keeping up the habits of 
right living we held up before you while here. 
Remember a clear brain must have behind it 
a good digestion. My slogan is still "Live in 
the fresh air and keep your feet dry." "All 
things work together for good" and sometimes 
a day off on account of illness may have a 
bright side. Some of you remember the girl 
who went reluctantly to "Sixty-one" and 
after spending one forlorn day began to see 
she might be happy even there and in con- 



trition wrote an ode dedicated to 

"That room we all dread 

Though why we should do so has never been 
said." 

Often your cheerfulness while there has 
taught us who cared for you many a lesson of 
patience and brought us to know and love 
you better. We hold you all close today and 
send you a glad God -Speed. 
Ever lovingly yours, 

Mary L. Nutt. 



My Visit to the Chicago Lasell Club 

Somewhat as a surprise to both the Chicago 
girls and myself, I was fortunate enough to 
attend the meeting of this live Lasell organi- 
zation on the afternoon of October third. A 
full report is to appear in this number of 
the Leaves from one of the members of the 
Club so I will simply mention a few of the 
many items which contributed to make my 
visit a most delightful one. 

To the generous hospitality of the Club and 
of the Goodwillies, who gave to me constant 
personal attention for the greater part of 
three days, and of the Joneses of Evanston 
with whom I took dinner, enjoyed the north 
shore drive and called at the home of Frances 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



Bragdon '05, I am greatly indebted. Under 
such favorable direction with the aid of the 
autos and with perfect weather my time was 
used to the best possible advantage 

As always, the most interesting part of 
this trip was the meeting with old friends and 
the making of new ones. Even so brief a 
meeting with the nearly thirty members of 
the Club who were present, all but two of 
whom had been at the Seminary during my 
period of service, made the trip worth while 
Modifying a statement attributed to Ex- 
President Eliot of Harvard one of the ex- 
periences which helps most to keep one an 
optimist is to meet those who have in past 
years been his students. To find that his 
hopes and expectations for them are actually 
being realized in the lives of his pupils is cer- 
tainly very satisfying to a teacher. 

Among the many pleasant incidents which 
I should mention was the meeting with Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. T. Shepherd of Evanston who 
were also guests of the Club. 

Chicago is a fine city and the two suburbs 
which I visited, Oak Park and Evanston, re- 
minded me much of Auburndale and the 
Newtons. It is gratifying to see such fine 
use made of the many beautiful parks thru- 
out the city. There are no picket fences nor 
"keep off the grass" signs. The Union League 
Club and the Chicago Art Club with their 
treasures of art and the unmatched Marshall 
Field make one wish for time. 

With reckless hospitality I was invited by 
the members of the Club to "come again," 
and I intend to accept at the first favorable 
opportunity. 

G. M. Winslow. 



FALL LUNCHEON 
The Chicago Laell Club 

The' success of the unusually interesting 
Fall Luncheon of our Chicago Lasell Club, 
which was held Saturday, October third at 
the Hotel La Salle, can easily be credited to 
Dr. Winslow who made the trip way from 
Boston, especially to be our guest of honor. 



We wonder if he realizes how pleased we 
all were, and how greatly he was appreciated 
with his splendid pictures of familiar faces 
and places about Lasell, but particularly by 
his presence. 

He told us many interesting bits of news 
of the past, present and future, and with the 
letters from Dr. C. C. Bragdon (Pasadena), 
Miss Potter, Miss Packard, Miss Nutt, 
Mademoiselle Le Royer, Miss Blaisdell, and 
the Editor of the Leaves, everyone felt her- 
self really in their midst at Lasell, and then 
awoke with a little homesick feeling for it all. 

Our other two guests of honor were Mr. 
and Mrs. W. T. Shepherd, whom most of us 
remember and who, though being acquainted 
with fewer of the girls, told of their pleasant 
days at Lasell with the "old girls." 

Thirty-two enthusiastic members were pres- 
ent; the table was decorated with pink roses 
and ferns, with dainty flower place-cards 
containing appropriate verses. 

Mrs. Lucile Zeller Ericson, our Vice-Presi- 
dent and Chairman of Arrangements, had to 
leave the city the day before the Luncheon 
for her brother's wedding in the East, so 
Mrs. May Florine Thielens Peeples our presi- 
dent presided in her absence. 

The newest gift from the Stork to be re- 
ported is Dorothy Whitney, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred B. Whitney (Mabel Judd '06) 
Chicago. 

With the singing of the "Alma Mater" and 
' ' Ho-E-La" , the meeting closed having brought 
every girl closer to Lasell and having given her 
even more love and enthusiasm for the school 
and its splendid faculty. 

Following is a list of those present. 

Mrs. Emily Eaton Thomas '98-'99, Mary 
S. Lumbard TO, Margherita O. Dike, TO, 
Louise C. Grunewald '03-'04, Frances Brag- 
don '05, Helen E. Carter '07, Mrs. Sara Hay- 
den Carlton 1895, Mrs. Annette Paley Matt- 
hews '01-'02, Margaret Jones '11, Loretta 
Salmon '01-'02, Louise E. Mayer '11, Frieda 
Mayer '11, Mrs. Julia Potter Schmidt '06, 
Christine Franck '02, Velma M. Voltz, Alma 



LASELL LEAVES 



25 



Bunch '13, Dora E. Goodwillie '14, Cora A. 
Giffin, Mary Goodwillie, Charlotte Lesh'12 
Florence Jones '12, Mrs. Hazel Carey Adam 
'05, Mrs. Edna Matthews Condit, Ruth 
Elizabeth Ketcham '13, Mrs. Mary Florine 
Thielens Peeples, Margaret Jones, Mrs. Ger- 
trude Gleason Shephard.Mrs.LilTukeyByram 
Lucille Guertin, Helen K.Ehrman,Dr.Winslow 
Mr, Shepherd, Mrs. Shepherd both con- 
nected with Lasell some years ago) . 

(Signed) Helen K. Ehrman Chairman. 



FIRST FIVE YEARS OUT OF LASELL 
Questionnaire 

In the spring of 1914 the registrar sent to 
the graduates of 1909 a list of thirteen ques- 
tions the most important of which were as 

follows: 

'Where have you spent your time since graduation 

(At home, in school or in travel). 
Have you taken an active part in the home work 

If married, are you keeping house? With or with- 
out a maid? 
Have you attended any other school or college? or 

kept up your study in any way? 
Are you actually at work in clubs, in church, in editorial 

lines or in business? 
What course of study at Lasell has been the greatest 

service or inspiration to you? What influence has 

meant most to you? 
From your experience since leaving Lasell what changes 
in or addition to the curriculum would you suggest? 

The report is based on these fifty-three re- 
plies. 

Class No. in class Replies Percentage 

1909 20 9 45% 

1910 27 12 44% 

1911 26 5 19% 

1912 i?> 16 48% 

1913 24 11 46% 
The class of 1912 deserves a prize for the 

greatest loyalty to this call of its Alma Mater. 

The object of this study was to discover, if 
possible, the relation between the curriculum 
at Lasell and the future activities of the 
graduates. The result is significant. 

That Lasell gives an impetus to further 
study is shown by the fact that in the last 
five years our recent, graduates have been 
connected with the following schools and col- 
leges, most of them specializing in the lines 
started with us. Wellesley, Columbia Gon- 



cher, College of the Pacific, Sophie Newcomb, 
Ohio State, Montana, Agricultural, Colorado, 
University of Paris, Institute St. Germain, 
Miss Risser's School Rome, Italy, Bay State 
Institute, Chatanqua School of Physical Edu- 
cation, Duluth Normal School Cincinnati 
Art Academy, Institute of Musical Art, New 
England Conservatory, Stout Institute, Miss 
Farmer's Cooking School, Lasell (graduate 
course) . 

LaselVs most popular course is HomeEcon- 
omics. 

Of the fifty-three, forty-one have taken or 
are taking an active part in the domestic 
duties of the home, eleven of whom are married 
Their activities have developed in many di- 
rections, home management with maids, cook- 
ing in emergencies, cake making, keeping 
house without a maid, etc. Eight of the re- 
maining have not had the opportunity as 
they have been in college, conservatory or 
travelling. Nine have continued their study 
in domestic science in Normal School and 
College. 

Seven are teaching one or more branches 
in domestic science in public or private school, 
two in settlement classes, one is helping to 
solve the Home Project Problem by exten- 
sion work in a Massachusetts town and five 
are members of sewing clubs of various kinds. 
One is turning her knowledge into a business 
proposition and is taking orders for nut breads 
salads, etc., while another has earned money 
as the only cook of the household. 

Music in popularity is close second to Home 
Economics, 

Twenty-six of the fifty-three studied music 
at Lasell, nine have continued their study, one 
is a graduate of the Institute of Musical Art, 
N. Y., two are in the N. E. Conservatory. 
Five have taught or are preparing to teach 
one a leader of a S. S. orchestra, three are 
church organists and three members of Musi- 
cal Clubs. 

English, a required study. 

Literary work. The literary tastes of th e 
girls find expression largely in the Woman's 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



Club work, its papers, programs, committees- 
etc. Two of the college girls, formerly in- 
terested in the Leaves are now on the edi- 
torial staff of the college papers, one has 
been a newspaper reporter, one has written a 
newspaper article on "School Athletics" 
and still another short stories and poems, 
One says "no literary work except letter 
writing" but as she has travelled extensively 
it certainly has literary possibilities. Letter 
writing is a lost art which Lasell girls would do 
well to reclaim. 

Travel Lecturer and courses in History of 
Art. 

These have proved of great value to the 
girls to whom the opportunities for travel 
have come. Nineteen have travelled far 
and wide, some in this country, many in 
Europe and two around the world. 

Chapel services, Bible classes, etc. 

These have borne this fruit. There are 
eighteen Sunday School teachers, thirteen offi- 
cers of young people's societies in the church 
including missionary societies, Endeavor so- 
cieites, camp fire girls, etc. In social ser- 
vice, they are working among the mill girls, 
in infant welfare and civic problems, hospital 
visitation, travel classes, kindergartens and 
settlements. 

If this questionaire is to be the criterion 
the five lines of study named above are the 
most productve in immediate practical re- 
sults, the other courses must prove their 
value, in the general culture and high ideals 
of the individual. 

If space permitted every statement in this 
report could be verified with names as it is we 
place them at the end, as the small boy did 
his commas, and the reader can fit them to- 
gether as she wishes. The writer sincerely 
thanks the girls who had a share in this study. 



Florence Swartwout Julia Terkuile ' 

Maude Dunlap Rosalie Seinsheimer 

Annie Merrill Elinor Ryan 
Wilhemina Joscelyn Swett Amanda Hexter 

Ernestine Lederer Ruth Kelsey 
Elizabeth Brandow Trumbull Cornelia Stone 

Ella Puchta Knight Marion Joslin 

Susan Stryker Mary Lumbard 

Bernice Linoln Beers Mildred Koch 

Olive Bates Mary Louise Cummings 

Jane Parsons Barbara Dennen Carpente 

Ruth Ketcham Marion McArthur 

Mary Wythe Julia Hamilton Peters 

Marion Hale Mary Fenno 

Marion Ordway Mildred Westervelt 

Edna Kaufman Georgina Fankboner 

Stella Rosenberg Mary Starr Utter 

Winifred Whittlesey Mary Gallaher 

Miriam Flynn Marie Hibbing Koller 



Since the May Supplement another Com- 
mencement has come and gone. The season 
is more and more not only a time of festivities 
for the out-going class but a time of reunion 
for the old girls. One of the pleasant feat- 
ures of this last June was the silver anni- 
versary of the class of eighty-nine a report of 
which we are glad to print. 



Theresa Gordon 
Helen Sayre 
Grace Alexander 
Doris Powers 
Caroline Steinmetz 
Constance Blackstock 
Bertine Libby 



Orra Hammond 
Julia Crafts 
Maria Riker 
Mildred Snyder 
Ruth Batchelder 
Marjorie Risser 
Viola Kafka 



REUNION OF THE CLASS OF '89 

This is how it came about twenty-five 
years ago, as the records say (otherwise it 
would seem incredible) twelve girls from nine 
states received their diplomas from Lasell. 
So strong were the ties which bound them to 
the school that it seemed fitting to come to- 
gether to celebrate their silver anniversary in 
June. Their numbers had been broken by 
one, Edith Gale, who died in Switzerland 
several years ago. 

Of the eleven, seven were in beautiful 
Auburndale for two happy days of Commence- 
ment week. They were Frances Barbour 
Sonntag, Winnie Ewing Coffin, Elizabeth 
Harwood Fones, Grace Huntington, Maude 
Mathews, Maude Oliver Harding and Mary 
Packard Cass. The four who were not 
present sent letters of greeting. Helen Gil- 
bert of Chicago who was with her sick mother, 
Leah Couts Anderson, who at the last moment 
was deterred in her plans from coming up 
from Texas, and Josephine Bogart, who was 
in Europe for the summer. Carrie Brown 



LASELL LEAVES 



27 



Cassell of Denver the only grandmother of 
the class was at the same time attending her 
son's graduation from military school in 
Illinois. 

Four old girls of '88 and "81-2" so called 
acted as substitutes, so the number was 
complete. Lina Jones Bourne, Nell White 
Fogg, Susan Hallock Couch and Winnie 
Adams Hamilton felt that this year they were 
members of '89 if not twenty-five years ago. 

It was especially pleasant to have the 
honorary member of the class, Miss Blaisdell, 
present to share the joy of the reunion. 

Besides enjoying Commencement festivi- 
ties, '89 had a class dinner at the Woodland 
Park Hotel, where place cards were old time 
photographs. The table was enhanced by 
gorgeous flowers and a "gorgeous banner." 
The next day found the girls motoring down 
the North Shore as far as Magnolia and en- 
joying a shore dinner at Nahant. It was on 
that trip that threads of the old days were 
picked up, and it did not take long, for all 
were girls again, the same fun loving, serious, 
gay and sensible girls, a little more mature 
and matronly, and all more loyal than ever 
to Lasell. 

'89 greatly appreciated all the courtesy 
shown by the school and the alumnae. At 
the meeting of the latter body, the class was 
proud indeed to be represented by Frances 
Barbour Sonntag. Her wonderful voice was 
received with encore after encore. 

After two short days the girls separated, 
one starting shortly for South America. But 
in spite of distance, '89 in her reunion has 
clinched friendships which never can be bro- 
ken. 

She is honored to have graduated from Lasell 
and does not mean that the school shall soon 
forget her. 



LASELL GIRLS AS LETTER WRITERS 

I have in my hand nearly half a hundred of 
delightful letters which Uncle Sam has 
brought to my office but the space allotted us 
for this month forbids my sharing many of 



them with you now. There are notes of 
courtesy and kindness, letters of travel, gos- 
sipy epistles, notes introducing the new girls 
requests for certificates, Nearly every one 
contains a tribute of love for Lasell. 

Marie Hibbing Koller writes from Vienna, 
Austria in July— "My husband is attending 
clinics and we are doing light housekeeping. 
I do not know how long we will remain but 
am positive we shall stay at least six months." 
(We understand she has been able to remain 

there) In 1912 my aunt and I had a 

most wonderful trip around the world 

I was in love with India and wish I might 
live there. We took a nine days horse-back 
trip from Agra up into the mountains, passing 
through a leper village. It was quite a novel 
experience to sleep in a tent and to know there 
were lions and tigers prowling in the neighbor- 
hood." 

Speaking of India reminds us that Constance 
Blackstock expects now to return to her home 
in India after an absence of eight years. She 
is to be one of the faculty of Lucknow College, 
with which both Anna and Isabel have been 
connected. Our best wishes go with her as 
she carries Lasell's principles into one of the 
best schools of the Orient. 

A twenty-two page letter from Margaret 
Henderson to her roommate and loaned to 
us gives her thrilling experiences in escaping 
with her family from Mexico. She is now at 
1424 21st St., Galveston, Texas. 

In a very enjoyable letter to Miss Potter, 
Christine Ryrie writes:— "About an hour ago 
I returned from the city and found my Leaves 
awaiting me. Before removing my coat or 
hat I sat down and eagerly scanned its pages 
for familiar names." After a vivid descrip- 
tion of a recent trip to Porto Rico and an 
anticipated trip to Egypt we find this "choice 
bit" concerning her home life. "We have a 
country place here, modeled on English lines 
and father is very loathe to leave it during 
the late spring and summer. I myself will 
admit that never have I seen anything more 
beautiful than our orchards were last week 
when the trees were one mass of blossoms." 



LASELL LEAVES 



LASELL STUDENTS 

Will Make No Mistakes 
In Depending Upon 

New England's 
Greatest Store 

FOR THEIR VARIOUS NEEDS 

Here one may choose from 
unequaled assortments of 
Clothing Furnishing Rugs Pictures 
Artwares Trunks and Luggages 

and the many other things so frequently 
needed during college days 



Best of all, selection here is never from 
commonplace stock but from the best that 
Europe and America can produce 

Jordan Marsh Company 



Cfcanbler & Co. 

Fremont Street, i^car WLt&t 

Dance and Party Frocks 

Millinery 
Suits, Coats and Blouses 

FOR MISSES FOR SMALL 
WOMEN 




Chandler & Co., are specialists in apparel for 
Misses, Youthfulness, smart style and fine 
material are united in garments and hats 
extremely becoming 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 



C. F. Hovey Company 

Summer, Chauncy and Avon Streets 
BOSTON, MASS. 

A Complete Assortment of 

FRENCH UNDERWEAR 

We have not advanced our 
prices on account of Europ- 
ean Troubles 

We offer extremely good values at popular 
prices, values even better than 
last year 

Gowns, Chemises, Combinations, 
Corset Covers, Drawers and 
Petticoats 

C. F. Hovey Company 



■:.ii^. ;-;■"* "- ■••-- - l^—.—.. ■■■j^w.--u 




The Plastic Shoe 



(Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 




In Low or High Cut 
and also in Pumps 



The Plastic Shoe 
is the result of 30 
years of j study [in 
the search for^a 
shoe that will help 
all foot troubles and 
still retain a grace- 
ful appearance. 

The Plastic Shoe 
assists one to'walk 
as nature intended. 
It removes the 
strain and ache 
resulting from walk- 
ing or standing in 
fitting shoes. 



Thayer, McNeil Company 

47/Temple^ Place 15 s West Street 



Jfflaugusf 
$rmtmg 
Company 



TOellesilep 
jflaasacfjusetts 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 



CHINA AND GLASS 

The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in this line 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glass 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits every season by ur buyers to the 
best makers in Great Britain, France, Germany, Austria and Amer- 
ica. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS . Gallery 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

FRANKLIN, COR. HAWLEY ST., BOSTON 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 

Compliments of 

GEO. J. BARKER LUMBER CO. 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



George C. Folsom 

HIGH, CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 



W. F. HADLOCK 
Newsdealer and Stationer 

Developing and Printing 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CAPODANNO & ALBANO 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery, Cigars nd Tobacco. 

431 AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Tel. Con. 

C. A. DONOVAN 

345 AUBURN STREET ft AUBURNDALE 

Ladies' and Men's Furnishings 
Dry Goods and Small Wares 

ELLIOTT W. KEYES 
PHARMACIST 
Drugs- Medicines-Chemicals-Choice Confections 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 



HAYDEN 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 

College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 



COTTRELL &ELONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS and GOWNS 

to the American Universities and 
Colleges, to Lasell Seminary and 
scores of other Academies. 

CLASS CONTRACTS A 
SPECIALTY. 

PULPIT and CHOIR GOWNS. 

Ilewfon Ice Company 




Post Office 

Address: 



MILLER BROS. 

Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 







Jm) 






til 




_ 








r«?i'.^ m 


IvRnh^raOTK! 


v ^^M^™ < 








HH J A 


IBi 


llllsS|lPSj^== 


~z^r^-~^~z~ ~?-^T^ rr - ~7"--^ 



LASELL LEAVES 31 



STOP AND READ 



IJIn a few weeks the new number of the 

Allerh will be ready for distribution. This will 

be without doubt the finest school publication that 
has ever been issued by a class at Lasell. 

IfThe book will contain more than 200 pages 
with over I 50 new illustrations of school life. 



In order to insure your subscription please 
see Florence Evans at once and leave your order. 



"DON'T WAIT" 
Class of 1915 . 



32 LASELL LEAVES 



Telephones] Hay market 2311-2312 



Flowers 
of Quality 



HOUGHTON -GORNEY CO 

:-: Florists :-: 



119 TREMONT STREET, 

[Park Street Church] 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Specialty 

Flower Shop of Boston 



FLOWERS "TELEGRAPHED TO ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Free Delivery to Lasell 



# 



MM 



';; —,,1^, .,, ' 





■■ 



% 



mmmm 



■ ■ ■ : '" : "" 



£ 







1S14 



TWO STUDIOS 



164 
TREMONT 
STREET 
Telephone Ox- 
ford 2687 




Kait photo^ 




~jgg|RT in relation to PORTRAIT 
PHOTOGRAPHY is the 

realization of beauty, grace and 
intelligence, as expressed in the finished 
portrait. 

Our advanced 1915 styles we honestly believe 
will appeal to you. Special discount rates to 
all Lasell Students. 



161 
TREMONT 

STREET 
Telephone 
Oxford 858 




Our Stock Never Gets Old 



NEW GOODS ARRIVE EVERY DAY 



41 



SUMMERS! 



*T RETAIL 



CHARGE 

ACCOUNTS 

OPENED 



Diamonds 
Watches 
Silver Goods 
Combs 
Cut Glass 
Coral Jewelry 
Roman Pearls 
Ebony Goods 



Vanity Cases 
Photo Frames 
Leather Goods 
Fountain Pens 
Brass Goods 
Chafing Dishes 
Percolators 
Parisian Ivory 



Our Watch and Jewelry Repair Departments do 
the best work at very low prices 

MR. F F. DAVIDSON 
AUBURNDALE 



LASELL LEAVES 



33 



A. SHUMAN & CO. 



The Service Store, Boston 



Tailored Apparel for 
College Girls of 
Rare Distinction 



Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabrics — 

Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 

Splendid Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

13 V 2 Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



•4 



We Can Please Yoa 

Come and See tor Yourselt 

Dry Goods, Small Wares, Dress Goods, Silks, 
Velvets, Linings, Laces, Gloves, Ribbons, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Hosiery, Underwear, Millinery,Cloth- 
ing, Hats, Caps, Shoes, and Garments ot every 
description. 



P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-135-137-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 



THE ONE GREAT TREASURE 

FOR EVERY STUDENT 

The Family Music Book 



800 PAGES 
CLOTH 



*1 



252 PIECES 
BOUND 



Contains $150 worth of music — vocal 
and instrumental. 

(Transit to Lasell 10 cents extra) 

Circular with complete information sent 
upon request. 

THE BOSTON MUSIC CO. 

26 and 28 West Street Boston, Mass. 

publishers THE g_ M _ C< EDITION 



34 



LASELL LEAVES 



Nearly a Century in 

CARPETS and RUGS 

Few concerns in this country have so long a business 
record and none in Floor Coverings. 

A large, well selected stock, shown by experienced 
salesmen and the same methods that won the respect and 
patronage of parents and grandparents we believe will 
prevail with the present generation. 

Quality considered, it is our purpose not to be under- 
sold by any of our competitors. 

Everything in Floor Coverings 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

646-650 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St. 



eyer jonasson 4 Go 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Waists, Furs and Sweaters 




Correct Overgatter Effects 



GARMENTS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 



A SPECIAL FEATURE 



This model comes in 
Patent Leather o r 
Gun Metal, Spanish 
heels and Cloth or 
Leather Tops in Gray, 
Black and Fawn. 

PRICES $6 TO $12 

10% cash discount to 
students and faculty of 
Lasell. 



Tremont Street Boston 




ASELL £EAVE5 



•DUX FEMINA FACTI" 



Vol. XXXX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., NOVEMBER, 1914 No. 2 

Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 
FLORENCE EVANS 



CAROL RICE 



Local Editor 
HELEN BENSON 



Assistant Local Editor ROSE BAER 



LIST OF OFFICERS 

Editor-in-chief 
NELLIE WOODWARD 

Associate Editors 

Art Editor 
EDITH HODGES 



Subscription Editor 
FRANCES HARRIS 



DORIS WALLER 



Assistant Art Editor, CHARLOTTE WHITING 

Personal Editor 
CATHARINE CARTER 



Exchange Editor 
MAUDE HAYDEN 

Assistant Exchange Editor 
ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 



Staff Photographer BESS EMERINE 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (Including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 



Class Presidents {frontispiece) 

Literary 

Locals 

Things Worth While . 



36 
37 
48 
52 



Editorial . 
Personal - _ 
Exchanges 



54 

55 
53 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar . 

Thomas Long 

A. Shuman & Co. 
Pinkham & Smith _ . 
P. P. Adams _ 

Schirmer 

T. E. Moseley Co. _ 
Meyer Jonasson & Co. 
Jonn H. Pray & Sons Co. 

Chandler & Co. 

Jordan Marsh Co. 

Thayer. McNeil Co. 
C. F. Hovey & Co. 
English Tea Room _ 

Nye Park Inn 

A. T. Bridges . 

The New Shop 

C. W. Thompson _. 



Inside front cover 
Inside front cover 

33 

. 33 

. 33 

__ 33 

. 34 

__ 34 

. 34 

60 

.. 60 

. 61 

. 61 

. 61 

. 61 

__ 62 

. 62 

... 62 



Cottrell & Leonard . 
W. F. Hadlock . 
Capodanno & Albano _ 

C. A. Donovan 

Elliott W. Keyes 

Haydsn 

Newton Ice Co 

Geo. J. Barker Lumber Co. . 
Jones. McDuffee & Stratton 

George C. Folsom 

Damon 

H. S. Lombard 

Carpenter M orton 

George P. Raymond 

Maugus Printing Co. 

Allerli . 
Houghton-Gorney Co. 



._. 62 

62 

-.62 

... 62 

.. 62 

.._ 62 

62 

_ 62 

62 

_ 62 
.. 63 
._ 63 
._ 63 

63 

.. 63 

„_ 64 

.Inside back cover 




OUR CLASS PRESIDENTS 



NELL WOODWARD, Seniors 

MARIAN BEACH, 1916 
JESSIE SHEPHERD, 1917 



BEATRICE BEACH, 1918 
EDNA CHR1STENSEN, "Specials" 
VIOLA KRUEGER, "Preps" 



Mimm 



THANKSGIVING AT CHESTER HALL 

"It's perfectly disgust- 
ing, the meanes tthing I 
^ver heard." 

"I know it, Just think 
of—." 

"I never heard yet of 
I a school that — ." 

"Oh my lovely invita- 
tion!" 

"It's perfectly horrid— 
"Yes, I always thought 
they had queer ideas here. 
I know it wasn't in the 
catalog, but I thought of course they had 
made a mistake. " r j 

It was nearly time for the morning chapel 
service at Chester Hall. The girls were 
collecting in the halls and waiting the sum- 
mons of the bell. Gathered in one corner 
was a group of very excited girls. 

"What's the trouble?" inquired several 
girls coming up to join, the group. 

"No Thanksgiving," chorused the girls. 
"What!" was the surprised exclamation. 
"What do you mean, no Thanksgiving 
inquired Jo in her droll way. 




"Just what we say," replied her roommate. 
"Ask Nan." 

"What about it, Nan? Speak up." cried 
the excited voices. j*j 

"Well, calm yourselves so I can hear my- 
self think. I will tell you this much. You'll 
know the rest later. I had an invitation to 
spend Thanksgiving with a friend. As I 
wanted— 

"Hold on! what's that got to do with us?" 
broke in one of the new comers. 

"Hold on, yourself, and I'll tell you. As I 
started to say, I wanted to reply to my in- 
vitation, and, as I had noticed that the 
Thanksgiving recess was omitted from the 
catalog, I went to ask Miss Parker how long 
we would have. She informed me that the 
catalog was perfectly correct and she will ex- 
plain in chapel this morning." 

"That is pretty bad," said Jo, who did not 
show her emotions easily and liked to jolly 
those who did. "What are you going to do 
about it?" 

At this moment the bell rang and the dis- 
gusted group broke up to file into chapel and 
to spread the news in excited whispers. 

After the usual service Miss Parker, the 
principal, rose and looked into eight}" in- 



38 



LASELL LEAVES 



quiring faces. "Girls, I have something to 
explain to you. Most of you, perhaps have 
noticed in the catalog that there is no mention 
of a Thanksgiving recess. Some have thought 
it was an oversight, but it is not. We want 
everyone to remain here for Thanksgiving." 
(Sighs from the girls) "Yes, I know it will 
be a disappointment to many of you, but we 
think we have some very good reasons for 
trying this idea : First, at the most there are 
only two days and it seems to be hardly 
worth while to break into the school routine 
for so short a time. And the process of pack- 
ing and unpacking helps to interrupt even 
more than the two days. Secondly: Although 
I realize that every girl who lives near enough 
looks forward to going home at this time it 
hardly pays her ; it is so short a time. It would 
be better to have the two days at Christ- 
mas. Thirdly: There are the girls who can 
not, because of the long distance, go home. 
Although we do our best to entertain them, 
there cannot help but be a pang of home- 
sickness when the others go and they are left 
behind." 

"Now this is something of our plan for 
Thanksgiving Day. We will not have the 
morning chapel service, but will gather a 
few minutes in the evening in the large 
sitting room. You will have the privilege 
if you like, of going to the Chase game. I 
notice there is sometimes a temptation to 
stray on forbidden territory. Make use of 
this opportunity. Chester Hall will furnish 
the dinner and program for the rest of the 
day. We want it to be a happy day for all 
and I ask you to cooperate with us to make it 
such." 

The girls hurried out of chapel to discuss 
the situation. Many protested, but the girls 
from far away agreed that this was an ex- 
cellent plan for them. 

The question was referred to and talked 
over for several days. The Seniors were the 
first as a class to show their loyalty and to 
pledge cooperation. The Juniors and under- 
classmen soon followed suit and agreed, if it 



must be so, to make the best of it and to get 
a good time somehow. There were, however, 
several who still declared that it would be a 
miserable Thanksgiving. 

A couple of weeks before Thanksgiving the 
atmosphere began to suggest festivities. The 
Seniors held class meetings and councils with 
the Faculty. They went about with smiling 
faces and "don't you wish you knew?" ex- 
pressions. A hint was dropped to the Juniors 
and lower classmen that it would be a good 
plan to dress for the dinner in costumes suit- 
able for the occasion. It was also suggested 
that wraps be brought "in case they should 
go for an after dinner stroll." After some 
consideration the girls all decided to dress as 
Puritans. This seemed to please the Seniors 
but they would not tell what their costumes 
were to be. Of the strange things going on, 
the strangest was the sound of hammering 
which came from the wood belonging to 
Chester and but a short distance from the 
campus. Through this the girls were re- 
quested not to walk until further notice. Of 
course everybody's curiosity was greatly 
aroused. 

The season was so late and the days so 
unusually mild for November that the girls 
could hardly realize it when at last Thanks- 
giving dawned bright and beautiful and warm. 

The girls gathered for breakfast with cheery 
greetings, trying with seemingly little effort 
to keep up a flood of conversation endeavor- 
ing to prevent any who were so inclined, from 
taking a gloomy outlook at the beginning of 
the day. The chief topic of conversation was 
the game. This was one of the popular inter- 
scholastic games of the state and the girls 
anticipated a good game. 

After breakfast they separated for a time, 
some going for a long walk, others returning 
to their rooms to finish their costumes. Most 
of the seniors disappeared, no one knew 
where — and others bustled about the building 
or campus with a great air of secrecy. 

At the appointed time nearly all the girls 
and several teachers started for the ball 



LASELL LEAVES 



39 



field. The game proved to be very exciting 
with a score of 3 to 3 made in the first half 
not to be changed until just five minutes be- 
fore the whistle blew. The girls' expectations 
certainly were fulfilled. 

The girls sauntered off the field, talking 
over the plays and taking a few last sidelong 
glances at the forbidden sex whom they 
"would not see for another year." 

"Really and truly, girls," broke out Jo to 
those about her, "if you don't stop looking 
at those boys and walk faster I shall die of 
starvation before I get back." 

"Poor Jo! And just think, you have to dress 
up before you can eat." 

"Oh help!" cried Josinking down on the stone 
wall. 

"Come on, Jo, here is a piece of chocolate 
I have left. Eat that and brace up." 

"Thanks," muttered Jo as she slowly 
munched a half inch square of chocolate and 
moved onward. 

Upon reaching the school all scampered to 
their rooms, promising to return ready for 
dinner when the bell should ring twenty 
minutes later. 

At that time the girls, very undignified 
for Puritans came rushing down to the dining 
room, for all were as hungry as Jo. . They were 
held up in the hall by half a dozen teachers. 
After all the underclassmen had gathered, 
Miss Brown said, "Follow your leaders. 
Forward, march!" and she and the other 
leaders started out of the door and across the 
campus. 

"Where in the world are we going," cried 
Jo. "I want something to eat." 

"I should say we all did," cried several. 
"Please, Miss Brown, where are we going?" 

"Follow your leader," came the answer. 

"Where are the seniors?" broke in some one. 

But "Mum is the word. Follow your 
leader," was the only answer. 

As the procession was led out across the 
field toward the wood the girls began to guess. 

"I know," said one. "They have built 



some kind of an old fashioned hut for us to 
eat in." 

"Maybe," returned another, "But that 
seems foolish to go to all that trouble when 
we could perfectly well eat in the dining 
room." 

They had by this time come to the opening, 
leading into the wood. Those at the front 
had stopped short exclaiming, "Oh, girls!" 
The others rushed forward and likewise halted 
in surprise. Through the trees wasa very pleas- 
ant and unexpected picture. There, against 
nature's own back ground of trees, and 
shrubbery and a few last bright autumn 
leaves, were placed six long tables heavily 
laden with the usual Thanksgiving feast. 
Standing about them giving the last finishing 
touches, squatting on the ground, or leaning 
against the trees were twenty-five or thirty 
Indians Just to the left hidden among the 
higher bushes, was a roughly constructed 
pavilion from which were coming maids with 
great platters upon which were the turkeys. 

Only for a moment did the girls stand in 
breathless surprise before the meaning of it 
all came to them. This was the Seniors' 
secret. In another instant the girls were on 
their Indian sisters, hugging and cheering 
them. 

Order was called and each Puritan was 
asked to take a nut from a basket. These 
appeared to be perfectly good nuts but upon 
examination it was found that they had been 
opened, the meats removed, and then skill- 
fully glued together again. Inside was the 
name of a partner for the dinner. Everyone 
was hungry and it was not long before the 
meal was under way. 

How like the first Thanksgiving was the 
picture of Indians and Puritans gathered 
about the same festal board. How different, 
too, from these primitive folk were the merry 
jestings and happy carefree faces of these 
young girls. 

The Seniors of course were besieged with 
compliments and questions. 

"Who ever thought of this idea?" 



40 



LASELL LEAVES 



"How did you work it?" 

"It's perfectly great. The best thing I 
ever heard of." 

"It tastes twice as good, and I can eat just 
twice as much out here," joined in Jo. "I 
am so glad I didn't die before I got here." 

"So are we, Jo," returned several. 

The meal was just what anyone would ex- 
pect an old fashioned Thanksgiving dinner to be 
and it was served with appropriate simplicity. 
Between the first course and desert, for there 
were only two courses, the girls sang old, popu- 
lar and school songs. They certainly were the 
jolliest crowd that ever partook of a Thanks- 
giving dinner. 

After dinner the old, old games, hide and 
seek, drop the handkerchief, and others were 
proposed and entered into with much enthu- 
siasm on the part of both girls and teachers. 
At sunset a big fire was built and all gathered 
about it to toast marshmellows, roast apples, 
pop corn, and tell stories. 

When the last spark had died out and the 
supply of stories and eatables had been ex- 
hausted the girls returned to Chester Hall to 
assemble for a few minutes with Miss Parker 
in the large sitting room. After reading and 
prayers Miss Parker asked how the girls 
thought the plan had worked. All agreed 
that it had been one of the happiest days of 
their lives. 

One of the western girls speaking for all 
who were from distant homes said, "Oh how 
glad we are that it was this way! How much 
lovelier than for a few of us to have to stay 
here alone. I am sure we are very grateful to 
you all for helping us out. Perhaps you also 
owe us a Westerners bit of gratitude." 

Helen Pope. 



Hamilton and Miss Lawton, 1914 graduates 
of Vassar College. Miss Potter, with good 
cheer, entered upon the difficult duty of chap- 
erone of this group. 

Many friends came to wish us a pleasant 
trip and flowers, telegrams and letters occu- 
pied spare moments until the warning gong 
made us rush to the rail, Lasell banners in 
hand, to wave good-bye to smiling faces 
turned up to us from the crowd below. Not 
one of us I think will forget the scene as we 
left the harbor especially if, as in my own case, 
it was her first long ocean voyage. 




THE LASELL EUROPEAN TRIP 

Tuesday June 16th, the Lasell party met on 
board the Caronia lying at her pier in South 
Boston. Besides the five of us who had been 
together at Lasell for the last year, there were 
two former Lasell girls, Hazel Bower and 
Sophie Wendt and two other girls, Miss 



This voyage was delightful with rest or di- 
version for all and serious sea-sickness for none. 
Some found amusement in deck tennis or 
shuffle board ; some kept track of the weather, 
the ship's progress, the news and all matters of 
that nature in small, neat volumes labeled 
"My Trip Abroad." These books*seemed to 
rival Baedeker for first place in their owners 
affections. Two balls, a book-dinner, a con- 
cert, stunts and contests, made the hours fly. 
As for sight seeing on the ocean, one day a 
whale came to the surface to blow; once we 
passed a Danish four rigged bark; and often 
we saw ships at a distance. One night we 
were obliged to lie still on account of a fog 
which shut even a sight of the waters out, 
like the dropping of a vast curtain. 

On the seventh day we sighted points of 
land on the Irish coast called, the Bull, the 
Cow and the Calf. Soon great flocks of 
seagulls came swooping around the ship and 
as we sailed on, friendly looking little fishing 



LASELL LEAVES 



41 



boats appeared. That night we left passen- 
gers at Queenstown, took on fresh fish and 
stale American newspapers. Next morning 
about four o'clock we stopped at Fishguard. 
We were sometime in getting used to people 
in their land clothing for steamer togs are 
deceptive. We docked at Liverpool at seven 
p. m. twelve hours late because of fog, and 
after little delay got through the customs and 
aboard a train which according to our be- 
loved chaperon took us in the direction of 
the English lakes. We stopped that night 
in Kendal at a quaint old inn, the Kings 
Arms. The house is six hundred years 
old but I think this fact had no effect on our 
tired minds until we had finished (literally) 
the dainty lunch of very thin bread and butter, 
jam, cheese, tea and chocolate which awaited 
us. 

After a dreamless sleep we were early on 
our way toward the beautiful lake region. 
Upon leaving the train that day we made the 
acquaintance of a unique, gaily-painted buss- 
like station wagon which rattled us to the 
Bellefield Hotel at Windemere. There is 
something so-well-brought-up looking about 
the quiet beauty of Windemere, — perhaps this 
is universal with the parts of England we 
saw, the garden-look, as if people had given 
care and love to the country for centuries. 

From Windemere we took a true English 
coach for which first balcony seats, reached 
by a ladder over the wheel are most popular. 
A seat inside the coach is both deafening and 
jarring. We drove through Ambleside and 
Grasmere and came during the afternoon to 
Rydal Mount. We visited the graveyard 
where Wordsworth lies buried. Then from 
a nearly level country we began the steep 
ascent of Hellvelyn where the coachman in- 
vited us to walk up the hill and save the 
horses. This coachman endeared himself to 
the party by his funny stories and stern de- 
fense of all things pertaining to Merrie Eng- 
land. His respect for his position was great, 
and no one was allowed to leave or mount 
the coach without his approval. Keswick 




THE COACHMAN WHO INVITED US TO 
WALK UP THE HILL 

more than twenty miles away from Winde- 
mere was our objective point that day and 
we reached it about seven-thirty, a fine time 
of day in June, for it was still daylight until 
about nine thirty in the evening. 

Thursday, June 25th, we journeyed from 
Keswick to Glasgow, a five hour train ride 
where we stopped only long enough for train 
connection to Balloch Pier. From the train 
windows we had a glimpse of the industry of 
ship building on the Clyde. From Balloch 
Pier we took a boat up Loch Lomond and 
the bright sun, the cool breeze, the hills rising 
on either side from the smooth water with 
new vistas of scenery continually opening 
before us, all added to the charm of the his- 
toric Scottish lake over which we were pass- 
ing. Rob Roy's cave and Ellen's Isle were 
points of interest on our way. 

At length, past sunset we stopped at Invers- 
naid. On the hill path behind our hotel we 



42 



LASELL LEAVES 



found enormous snails whose dignified pro- 
gress amused us and wooley sheep which 
scampered along turning to look back with 
baas of astonishment. We spent another 
very delightful day by boat on Loch Katrine 
and by coach through the Trossachs region 
arriving at Edinburgh for a week-end stop. 

Sunday morning we were wakened by 
Cathedral chimes. We attended a Presby- 
terian service at St. Giles Cathedral; saw the 
home of John Knox, the balcony from 
which he used to preach and his grave; also 
made the acquaintance of famous Prin ces 
Street, with its notable monument to Sir 
Walter Scott. Tin the afternoon we looked 
over Edinburgh castle. To assist us we had a 
funny fat guide with tiny little turned up 
mostaches through which he puffed asthmat- 
rically before an important f statement. 
He carried a stick like a baton which he 
twirled as he talked. The Scotch guard at 
the castle stood resplendent in full native 
costume or marched back and forth on a 
certain beat. This castle is still used as a 
garrison. 

Here within the walls stands the Norman 
chapel of Margaret who fled to Scotland after 
the Norman conquest. From the castle 
rock, the natural strength of the fortress 
position is shown, for from it one looks down 
over the city and the surrounding country. 
Driving home we had a view of Arthur's 
Seat, an eruption of volcanic rock rising 
eight hundred feet above the level of the 
plain. We could not enter Holyrood Palace 
as it was being prepared for a visit of King 
George in July. 

Edinburgh was practically our first shopping 
stop. We admired the arrangement of having 
the best shops all on Princes Street and hoped 
that we had been "canny" as to purchases. 

Tuesday we visited Melrose Abbey, where 
rests the heart of Bruce, Dryburgh Abbey 
where Sir Walter Scott lies buried and 
Abbotsford the loved home of this great 
novelist. Abbotsford, with its rare collection 
of armour and treasures, has been often de- 



scribed. To me, the study where so many 
famous stories were written was the most 
interesting room of all. I was sorry to leave 
Edinburgh next morning, for Scotland, what 
I saw of it, is fascinating, but our schedule 
mentioned us as already at York, so we left 
Edinburgh for Durham where we saw our 
first great cathedral, built in Norman style. 

Before entering the great structure where 
a mothers' meeting was about to be held, 
officials at the door examined the purses and 
bags of about twelve hundred women for 
revolvers or bombs. They made no excep- 
tion of travelers. Thus immediately we 
realized that we were in England again. 

York with its wonderful minster next 
claimed our attention. This "grand monu- 
ment of ancient arts" in its present form was 
finished in about two hundred and sixty years 
being completed in 1480. Here we were not 
allowed to carry in hand bags at all. From 
a certain ceiling in the minster hang the 
tattered war flags of the Yorks and the 
Lancasters, together with later war emblems. 
On the right from the main entrance is a queer 
clock surmounted by two figures dressed in 
the armour of Henry the VII. These figures 
strike a soft-toned gong every quarter hour. 
The stained glass in the minster is beauti- 
ful and remarkably precious since the art of 
obtaining such clear color has been lost. 
One window in five parts called "The Five 
Sisters" is said to be a faithful copy of some 
old embroidery done by five sisters of York. 
It is hard to tell whether the old minster is 
more imposing from the exterior or interior 
but it must remain always a golden memory 
to anyone who has spent even a brief hour in 
study of it. 

From York we went to Warwick. Our 
first sight seeing day from this point took in 
Kennilworth Castle, Warwick Castle and an 
afternoon's visit to Stratford-upon-Avon. The 
castles were in direct contrast; one was in 
ruins with a flock of sheep nibbling the green 
grass about it ; the other was like one's dreams 
of a castle preserving many a treasure and 



LASELL LEAVES 



43 



still serving as a modern residence. Here 
were peacocks walking with stately step about 
the widespread lawns. 

Stratford is another much described place 
and to me it was just what I had confidently 
expected from reading of it. 

At Oxford we made a somewhat rapid 
survey of the colleges owing to rainy weather; 
but no one moped about the rain for we had 
traveled through the Lake regions unsoaked, 
a rare record. 

London found us more than ready for the 
first home mail and quite ready to stay a 
few days in one place. The travelers office in 
London was almost a glimpse of home, full 
of Americans and with a rack filled with home 
papers. On the afternoon of the Fourth of 
July we drove about, saw St. Paul's, Bucking- 
ham Palace, London Tower, Big Ben on the 
House of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, 
Hyde Park and other places of interest. At 
dinner we had candy firecrackers and tiny 
flags in recognition of our national birthday. 
Some of the party attended a service at West- 
minster on Sunday, during which a suffragette 
was forcibly removed from the building. 
Others heard Reginald Campbell speak at 
the City Temple. Still others attended one 
of the meetings of the World Conference of 
the Salvation Army and heard members of 
the Swedish delegation speak. On Monday we 
saw the British Museum. We failed to see 
the National Gallery for who could tell 
whether we carried concealed hatchets? In- 
stead we shopped and went for another drive 
to see the Bank cf England, the Jewish slums, 
the market, Solomon Levi clothes stores, 
Petticoat Lane and the Embankment. 

On the night of the eighth of July we crossed 
the English Channel, landing very early in the 

morning, really on the continent. Our first 

definite stop was Middleburg to see the quaint 

costumes of the women who were bringing 

goods from the country to public market. 

It seemed so queer to see little girls and boys 

trudging beside their elders in clothes of 



precisely the same cut and color, miniature 
men and women with round, solemn little 
faces. 

From Middleburg we went to The Hague 
and drove about to see the points of interest 
in the city including, of course, the Peace 
Palace, the present royal residences and 
later, the House in the Wood, an old royal 
home. Dutch country as everyone knows is 
very flat and green with many a black and 
white cow grazing about and with slow turn- 
ing windmills in the distance. We had a 
good view of the greenness from the train 
windows while going to Amsterdam. 

At Amsterdam we took one day for a trip 
to the islands of Edam, Volendam and 
Maarken. Such curious people! They make 
you feel far enough from every day affairs. 
Their islands make up their worlds. Maar- 
ken people have been photographed by tourists 
until now they turn and run from a camera 
and who can blame them. The odors of 
Volendam when the fishing boats are in, are 
unforgettable without photography but here 
the people are very thrifty and will pose 
pleasantly for a tip which is, however, quite 
essential. 




LOOKING BACKWARD 



44 



LASELL LEAVES 



As we passed under a certain toll bridge on 
our way home en the canal, a weeden shoe 
was let down en a line for the toll charge, a 
worn, wooden shce; the Dutch wouldn't use 
a new one for such a purpose. 




On Sunday a small delegation attended an 
English - Dutch reformed church and were 
invited after the service to a real Dutch home 
for coffee which is used in Holland much 
as tea is in England or Japan. Real Dutch 
cakes, sweet and spicy, were served also and 
compliments were exchanged. Hospitality 
seemed to these kind people both a privilege 
and a pleasure. We took a long ride out of 
Amsterdam one evening on the dyke to a 
sort of summer resort with brightly lighted 
cafes and crowds of gay people. At 
the Ryk Museum in Amsterdam we saw 
works of famous Dutch painters including 
the "Night Watch," "Syndics of the Cloth 
Guild," "The Buffoon" and others. 

It took an afternoon train ride for us to 
reach Cologne from Holland which had been 
truly a foreign country. 

The great cathedral of Cologne towered 
high in air as we approached the city but 
not until the next morning did we go to 
examine it closely. The gargoyles on the 
waterspouts of this cathedral are particularly 
queer and impressive. Here as at York, 
beautiful stained glass windows quaint carv- 
ing and big quiet spaces invite the worshiper 
to prayer and devotion. 

The following day was spent in a twelve 
hour trip up the river Rhine; at first the 



scenery was disappointing but when we got 
away from the cities, it was much more beau- 
tiful. Vineyards sloped down to the water's 
edge and now and then we saw one of the 
many castles known to story. A terrific 
thunderstorm struck us suddenly in the 
afternoon but after about half an hour the 
sky cleared into a beautiful sunset. That 
night we stayed at Mainz and did not reach 
Heidelberg until noon of the next day. At 
Heidelberg we saw the castle considered one 
of the most beautiful in all Europe. We went 
into some of the University class rooms and 
saw the dwelling place of the students. 
These students almost without exception 
have sabre cuts on one or both cheeks. 

From Heidelberg we turned to Switzerland 
and saw our first Alpine sunset as the train 
came into Inteflaken where snow covered 
mountains greeted us on either hand. From 
our room balconies at the hotel we looked 
straight over at the Jungfrau clothed in bridal 
white. Here we were almost sun worshipers 
for each sunrise and rosy sunset glow was an 
event to be marveled over. Interlaken proved 
to have alluring shops and some embroidery 
belonging to the party still awaits in Paris 
a safe passage to America. We spent an 
afternoon driving in a Swiss diligence up 
the Lauterbrunnen Valley to see the Stau- 
bach and Traumelbach Falls. Another day 
we climbed by cog railway Harder mountain, 
a thousand feet above the town. 

Leaving Interlaken we traveled by boat and 
train up over the Brunig Pass, four thousand 
feet above sea level past the Giesbach Falls 
to Lucerne, where we spent two days looking 
at the old bridges, the famous lion and glacier 
park above it. Here, too, we heard an organ 
recital, one selection of which was a remarkable 
musical imitation of a storm in the Alps. 

From Lucerne we mounted up, up through 
the most beautiful scenery we had met with 
and over the St. Gothard Pass down to Lugano 
where the next steamer ride brought us to 
Bellagio over the hazy blue and gold wonder 
of Lake Como. That evening, our first in 



LASELL LEAVES 



45 




** 



Italy, a boatman took us out over that star- 
lit lake, absolutely quiet; the only signs of 
life, the twinkling lights in the villas along 
the shore. 

( To be continued) 



MON PETIT 

It was a beautiful face that looked up at 
Dr. Prentier, on that Thanksgiving clay, as 
he pressed a coin into the work-hardened 
hand of the old flower- vender; a face that 
would haunt one; large black eyes, fringed by 
long curling lashes and holding in their 
depths a world of misery; eyes placed in so 
thin a face that one noticed nothing else. 

"Merci, Mo sieur," breathed the little old 
lady, and then — half-startled — "Gerard, mon 
petit." But again as some customer came 
up, she busied herself with the sale of her 
flowers. 

"Mon petit," repeated Dr. Prentier to 
himself, as he started to move away. The 
words seemed to pursue him. Where had he 
heard them before? Turning back, he gazed 
thoughtfully into the face of the flower- 
vender. The evening was growing late and 
the last purchaser had gone. As the little 
lady was gathering up her remaining flowers, 
she felt a touch on her arm. 

"Is your home far from here?" asked the 
stranger, whose looks had startled her. At 
her answering in the affirmative, he inquired 
the street and number . Then he assisted 
her gently into his car, which stood near. 

"Market Street, John," directed the Doc- 
tor; then to the flower- vender, "Now, my 



dear madam, how did you know me? Who 
are you? and why did you call me 'mon 
petit'? No one has ever called me that but 
my — ah — well, that was long ago." 

"Has Monsieur time? It is a long story." 
Monsieur signified that he had time and she 
continued : — 

"About forty years ago, in the most beau- 
tiful part of France, Normandy, there lived 
Marie Argier, with her father, as happily as 
a bird. She was content to dance for him, 
tend his vineyard, and sing to him alone, 
for was he not her own dear father. Well, a 
few years went by and when Marie was 
about eighteen, another man came into her 
life," continued the flower-vender with a 
happy light in her eyes, — "a man of three 
and twenty years; straight and blond, like 
you, Monsieur. A few months later, Marie 
and he were married in a church among the 
flowers. Two happy years passed. Then a 
little son was given them, the most lovely 
flower-child in all the world, with great black 
eyes and golden hair. And" —back again 
came the sadness in the black depths of her 
eyes— "they were very happy for three years, 
and then the great European war broke out. 
Ah — Monsieur, only those who have suffered, 
know what war means. Gerard, who was a 
brave man, was called upon to enlist and, of 
course, he must respond. The rest, monsieur, 
is the old, old, story. Marie never saw him 
again." 

"As the war wore on, it became impossible 
for her to support her son, and, with crowds 
of other refugees, she sailed for America. 
The horror of that voyage she can never for- 
get, nor the tragedy of its ending; as they 
landed,. the crowd was so very great that in the 
throng Marie, Monsieur, lost her child. That 
was more than thirty years ago, but Marie, 
the flower-vender, has never found him. Well 
Monsieur, that is what war can cause. And 
now, Europe is at peace but 'mon petit' has 
never come back." 

For a time, there was quiet in the car, a 
peaceful quiet of deep love. For the great 



46 



LASELL LEAVES 



Dr. Prentier had taken the little old lady in 
his arms. Then as the car turned into the 
dingy quarter, in which she lived, Gerard 
spoke. But the only audible words were, 
"my mother, my Thanksgiving." 

"Mon petit," whispered the little old lady, 
to whose cheek had come the bloom of youth. 

Gladys Frauenihal. 



KATHRYN 

{Continued from the October Leaves) 
The next few days changed Kathryn's 
mind about that man. She and Dale were 
frequently together either canoeing, swim- 
ming, walking or playing golf and tennis. 
Yet as time went on she still declared that 
she didn't like those Northrup girls. Her 
dislike grew when she heard of their saying 
that they couldn't understand what that 
Dennis girl could see in Dale Lodge. As for 
themselves they could not be bothered with 
him although he had repeatedly asked them 
to go walking and canoeing. "The idea, 
Auntie," she exclaimed with great indigna- 
tion. "Dale doesn't care for them, and 
never did, but it just makes me furious to 
hear them talk that way." 

"I don't blame you, dear. But why worry 
and fret when you know what they say isn't 
true? Just have a good time and forget what 
other people say." 

I knew this was more easily Said than done 
for Kathryn was not a girl who readily for- 
got. A few days later the quarrel happened. 
I was the cause of it, although I claim it 
was the fault of the spool of red silk. Pat, 
who was going to town said he had too many 
things to get and too short a time to attend 
to my errand. So Kathryn and Dale volun- 
teered to go with Pat and get the silk for me. 
They were then to do other errands and 
meet at the dock in a half-hour. At 
the drug-store where Dale had gone to 
get some strictly fresh candy, he came upon 
the Northrup girls who stopped and chattered 
at him for a few minutes. "I'm sorry," he 
finally found a pause in which to say, "but 



Kathryn is waiting for me and as her Uncle 
is in a hurry to get home I shall have to be 
going." 

"Oh, wait until tonight and go home with 
us," they both chorused. "The Inn is 
having a big dinner-dance. Why not stay 
for that with us? Charlie Morris will come 
and of course, Mother will chaperone us." 

"I'm sorry but Kathryn and I had planned 
a ride to Gull Island in the motor boat so 
I—." 

"Of course, you can bring Kathryn along," 
Doris interrupted. "We would love to have 
her in the party. Do say you will postpone 
the ride and stay for the dance instead!" 

Dale hesitated. "I suppose we could go 
tomorrow night. Let's go tell Kathryn and 
see what she says." 

Poor, thoughtless Dale! He might have 
known better, especially, since he now 
understood so well Kathryn's foolish dislikes 
and her Irish temper. Needless to say, the 
storm began to gather when Kathryn saw 
Dale walking toward her between those two 
girls. After the greetings, the proposition 
of staying for the dance was put before her. 
She knew what that would mean. The 
Northrup girls would do their utmost to 
claim all of Dale's attention, as well as to 
make it an unpleasant evening for her. She 
thanked them politely, but declined their 
invitation. 

"Oh, come Kathryn! We can go to Gull 
Island tomorrow night. We can't dance 
every night, you know." Dale was very fond 
of dancing. 

That was too much and the storm broke. 

"Thank you, but / am going home with 
Uncle Pat and you," she flashed at Dale, "may 
come home when and with whom you please." 
At that, she walked "haughtily"— so she told 
me afterwards — "towards the dock and turned 
a deaf ear to all Dale's entreaties to listen." 

That was exactly how it happened. A silly 
quarrel, wasn't it? But it lasted for one, long 
miserable week at the end of which, it ended 
rather strangely. On one of our daily walks 






LASELL LEAVES 



47 



to the south shore, we climbed upon a fence, 
while the children romped and played. In 
the midst of some serious argument (as to 
whether girls ought to dress their hair over 
their ears, or leave them uncovered, or some 
equally important question) Dale came strut- 
ting toward us from around the bend of the 
road. 

"Hello, Mrs. Mack," I abhor being called 
"Mrs. Mac," but somehow Dale is different. 
"Oh, how do you do, Kathryn." He added, 
as though it had just dawned upon him that 
she was there; I knew perfectly well, that he 
had had his eyes glued on her ever since he 
had sighted us. 

"Dale, you haven't been over to the house 
for a long time. The boys do miss you so. 
You will just have to come over, to see their 
train track they have built out of laths. Their 
father has to be out in the back yard nearly 
all day long so he can be their train whistle. 
I asked them the other day, if I couldn't be 
a substitute and they answered that "father 
could make so much noise and anyway, he 
did look so funny when he tried to whistle." 
They do have the— I would have 

rambled on forever, if Kathryn hadn't in- 
terrupted. 

"Em sorry, Auntie, but I must be going," 
and she made an attempt to get down from 
the fence. 

"May I help you?" Dale asked politely. 

"Thank you, I need no help." Cold! 
Icicles dropped from every word. I myself 
nearly froze. 

"I'll call the boys. Then we can all walk 
back together." I said this with the hops 
that Kathryn would stay for I knew that at 
heart she wished the foolish quarrel at an 
end. 

Children never come when they are called. 
Dale, therefore, thought he would wait on the 
fence as we were doing." Well, that old fence 
seemed to resent this added burden. Three 
were too many for its dignity. To show its 
disapproval, it creaked, it groaned, it shook 
and last but not least, it collapsed. We went 



with it. Now what else could you have done, 
even if you had quarralled with another, than 
laugh. A graven image would have laughed 
at the three gasping, dazed-looking, prostrate 
grown-ups. That ended the quarrel. We 
all three returned home happier than we had 
been for a week. There were no more quar- 
rels after that. 

This afternoon the postman brought me 
the formal announcement of their engage- 
ment. Down in one corner there were written 
these few words, "Bless that dear old fence." 

Edna Christensen. 



THE VOICE OF THE WIND 

I 

When the dew-jewelled fingers of Spring-time 
Draw aside the soft curtains of snow; 

And the earth stands revealed in its beauty, 
In its splendor and myst'ry aglow, 

The Voice of the Wind lilts a love-song low,- 
Responsive the earth dances to and fro. 

II 

When the more mature beauty of Summer 

Is fulfilling the promise of Spring; 
When the earth is a pageantry vivid. 

O'er which wonderful bird-voices sing, 
The Voice of the Wind sounds a pagean high. 

Which echoes aloft in the vaulted sky. 

Ill 

When the glory of Summer is fading 
And all nature feels weary and old; 

When the Midas-like hand of the Autumn 
Turns the earth to a flame-tinted gold; 

The Voice of the Wind croons a lullaby. 

The poor sleepy earth heaves a drowsy sigh. 

IV 

When the frosty-tipped fingers of Winter 
Throw a mantle of snow o'er the earth; 

And all nature drifts off into slumber. 

Thus awaiting the Springtime's new birth. 

The Voice of the Wind chants a mournful dirge. 
Yet prayerful hopes through its sad depths surge. 

Margaret Allen. 





CLASS ELECTIONS 

On Halloween night as we entered the hall- 
way we were very much pleased and sur- 
prised to see large posters announcing the 
Junior elections which are as follows: 
President — Marian Beach 
Vice President — Anne Cornwall 
Secretary — Dorothy Mathias. 
Treasurer — Rose Baer 
Cheer Leader — Marion Newland 
We had been in the Gym only a brief time 
when our attention was attracted by the ring- 
ing of a bell and the announcement of the 
Sophomore officers: 

President — Jessie Shepherd 
Vice President — Emelia Frankel 
Secretary — Marjorie Morrison 
Treasurer — Marie Phoebe Haskell 
Cheer Leader — Marie Kolb 
The party had been in full sway but a few 
minutes when we heard the Freshmen an- 
nouncing their officers: 

President — Beatrice Beach 
Vice President — Katherine Allen 

Secretary / . • 

_ — Linette Rogers 

1 reasurer [ 

Cheer Leader — Katherine Hardwick 



On Monday night, November 2, we thought 
Fourth of July had come again when we heard 
a sky rocket in the balcony. We soon discov- 
ered that this was sent of by one of the Special 
Class who were about to tell us of their officers 
for the year: 

President — Edna Christensen 

Vice President — Helen Schooley 

Secretary — Ruth Anderson 

Treasurer — Edna Lucas 

Cheer Leader — Edna Peterson 
The Preparatory Class officers are : 

President — Viola Krueger 

Vice President — Helen Moebs 

Secretary \ 

Treasurer J 

Cheer Leader — Louise Clark 

Just before the Specials' announcement 
in the dining room the Juniors sang to the 
Seniors, an attention which the Seniors 
greatly appreciated. 



-Gertrude Linke 



MANDOLIN OFFICERS 

President — Vilette Peck 

Secretary \ 

Treasurer / 

Leader — Katherine Hoag 



-Elsie Doleman 



LASELL LEAVES 



GLEE CLUB OFFICERS 

Among the other elections of the past month 
we must not fail to mention that of the Glee 
Club. Its officers for the year are: 
President — Elizabeth Beach 
Vice President — Martha Schuman 

Secretary \ - . 

^ r — Katnenne Bingaman 

I reasurer J fe 

Business Manager — Laura Hale 

Leader — Helen Benson 

Accompanist — Nell Woodward 



John Hancock's home and that of the well 
known author, Louisa M. Alcott. At*the 



Halloween evening the girls celebrated by 
having a masquerade in the gymnasium. 
The gymnasium was appropriately decorated 
with corn stalks, ghosts and jack-o-lanters. 
Two barrels of apples were within convenient 
reach of all. Miss Anna Cornwall enter- 
tained the girls with an oriental dance and 
Misses Grace Farley and Eleanor McCarty 
with an interesting Spanish dance. The girls 
also enjoyed watching the second Mr. and 
Mrs. Castle demonstrate their skill, especially 
when they realized that they were Marian 
Newland and Louise Clarke. A story was 
read by Miss Florence Hauslein and illus- 
trated by shadow screen pictures which caused 
much merriment. Dances for all followed and 
at the end a grand march, during which the 
judges viewed the costumes. Misses Halley 
Dickie and Margaret Powell received the 
first prize, a box of candy. They were dressed 
as little boys. Miss Florence Hauslein was 
voted to have the funniest costume; Miss 
Hala Zach, the prettiest; Misses Eleanor Mc- 
Carty and Grace Farley received honorable 
mention. When too tired to dance, the girls 
had their fortunes told by Jacquelin Bick- 
ford. When it was time to go home, 
everyone said they had had "just loads of 
fun!" 



THE LEXINGTON AND CONCORD TRIP 

Monday, October 26, a large party con- 
ducted by Mr. Ordway took the trip to the 
historical places, Lexington and Concord. 
Among the places of greatest interest were 




START OF CONCORD" TRIP 



home of the latter the party enjoyed a picnic 
lunch after which they drove on to Concord. 
This drive was particularly interesting be- 
cause of the tablets along the road side re- 
lating the story of Paul Revere's ride from 
to Concord. The last stop was 



Lexington 




MINUTEMAN'S STATUE 



50 



LASELL LEAVES 



made at Thoreau's Cairn where the girls 
added their good luck stones to the pile. 




LUNCH AT LOUISA ALCOTT'S HOME 



SALEM 

Monday morning about forty-five of us 
girls under the careful and delightful chaperon- 
age of Dr. Morgenthaler, Mr. Ordway and 
Mr. E. J. Winslow, hurried to Boston. At 
the North Station we found reserved for 
Lasell's daughters a special car which soon 
brought us to Salem. There our luncheon 
boxes were taken from us and placed in a 
cab. We were much surprised to meet them 
again at the Peabody Institute. 

A guide met us at the station and led us 
directly to an old cemetery from which he 
pointed out the ruins of Old Salem, extending 
more than a mile and a half from the east to 
the west. 

There the party was divided and one group 
went first to the Old Witch House, now used 
for a queer old drug store and an antique shop. 
Here once lived a judge, and here, because 
the court-house was so small, he held the 
famous witch trials. We walked through an 
old chimney to a cellar where some of the 



witches were confined, while waiting for trial. 

We next went to the Ropes Mansion, a 
fine, old house furnished in the style of the 
late seventeenth and early eighteenth cen- 
turies. In the rear of the very attractive 
home, open to the public, by the will of the 
last direct heirs of the Ropes, was a beautiful 
formal garden. 

The Essex Museum next claimed our at- 
tention. It contains fine exhibits of antique 
furniture, ancient war weapons, model rooms 
of an age gone past, and many more things of 
interest. 

We were then led through another old house, 
the type of the cottage house of 1770. It 
has old looms, a typical, large, fire-place 
and a dear old attic with delapidated trunks 
stored under the eaves. 

From there we easily walked to the Peabody 
Institute. Here Prof. Morse gathered us like 
lambs to the fold and delivered an interesting 
lecture on "Why We See the Half Moon." 
Then in the large work-room of the Museum, 
we ate a good luncheon and hastened to look 
over the exhibits. The museum contains the 
best collection of pottery, of Japanese and 
of Chinese curios in the world. 

Then came the best event of the day, We 
walked down toward the harbor to "The 
House of Seven Gables." It is an old, brown 
wooden house, well preserved. The heavy 
hall door leads into "Hepzibah's Shop." The 
low-ceilinged rooms are furnished with Shera- 
ton and other fine, old styles of furniture. At 
the front windows over looking the Salem 
Harbor, Hawthorne loved to sit and dream. 

Leading from the pleasant dining room is a 
secret passage-way in which, perhaps, witches 
were hidden from justice. Enclosed in the 
wall, the narrow winding staircase, up which 
we climbed with difficulty led to a room in 
the third story— "Clifford's bed-room." 

Down in Hepzibah's old fashioned store, we 
bought "Ye Salem Gibraltars" and "Black 
Jack" candies made in Salem from its earliest 
days. There, too, we secured many sou- 
venirs of the trip. 



LASELL LEAVES 



51 



By far the most interesting souvenir of the 
day's fun was "The Cup of Destiny" in which 
we advise you to try your fate, lest you be 
taken for witches, when you go on this 
most delightful trip to Salem. 

Dorothy B. Smith '16. 



ART EXHIBIT 

In the studio from November third to 
seventh, an opportunity was given to the pub- 
lic and to the students to see a collection of 
Henri Gerardot's paintings. This rare privi- 
lege was secured through the efforts of Mile. 
Le Royer and Miss Mulliken who know per- 
sonally this distinguished and gifted French 
artist. 

M. Gerardot is deeply interested in relief 
work for the wounded soldiers. At his villa 
in the French Alps he is caring for twenty- 
two men at his own expense. All the money 
realized from this and from other exhibitions 
of his pictures he desires to have devoted to 
further efforts for alleviating distress among 
the soldiers or their families. Lasell is hon- 
ored in being allowed to share in his work. 



The Seniors wish to thank all the classes 
for the delightful serenading during the week 
of November 2. All the serenades were at 
night except that of the Sophomores who came 
to sing to their sister class early Saturday 
morning and presented each Senior with a 
yellow crysanthemum tied with purple and 
gold, the Sophomore colors. 



On Saturday, October 31 a large party of 
girls went to the Harvard-Michigan foot-ball 
game. A great deal of enthusiasm was shown 
and although the score was most favorable 
for Harvard, our Michigan girls and others 
are still loyal to the yellow and blue. 



Lasell was very glad to have Dr. Leon Vin- 
cent at the school again on October 29. His 
lecture was on the life and writings of Robert 
Louis Stevenson. We are having the un- 



usual treat of hearing five of his lectures this 
year. 

On Thursday, November 5, Miss Nutt 
gave a lecture on Health. Her talk was 
filled with practical suggestions and warnings 
which we are resolved to heed. 



Looking down from the highest places of 
the Boston Opera House, Friday night, Octo- 
ber sixth, twenty or more of the girls, very 
greatly enjoyed seeing "Pavlowa." 



The Harvard Princeton Glee Concert was 
enjoyed very much by many of the girls, 
Friday night, October sixth, in Jordan Hall, 
Boston. 



Wally could not play hockey one day be- 
cause she was baking a chicken and had to 
baste it. 

Kitten said, "Why Wally, I thought you 
had already sewed it up!" 



Overheard at the first riding lesson: 
"Oh how do you steer this horse?" 
"Yes, we had a lovely time, we catered 
nearly all the way!" 



For Good Looking Girls Onty! 
■ .)>; uvipx-g — jpajiaouoo noA j.ua.iB 'snopBJQ 





LASELL MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Among other organizations of Lasell, the 
Missionary Society claims a prominent place. 
In other years, this Society has done much 
toward helping those less fortunate than its 
members both in this and in other countries. 
Then, living so near Boston, we have the ad- 
vantage of hearing many prominent and in- 
teresting speakers thus learning more of the 
splendid work which is being accomplished 
for so worthy a cause. 

The Missionary Society has charge of one 
vesper service each month and prepares at 
the beginning of the year a program of sub- 
jects for these meetings. The best speakers, 
available, are engaged to speak to us at these 
meetings which are most instructive and help- 
ful. This year we have chosen for the sub- 
ject of our program, "Our Work for the World' ' 
and we hope to learn more of what may be 
accomplished through such movements as the 
Student Volunteer, the Young Women's 
Christian Association, and the College Settle- 
ments. 

The money which is pledged for the Mission- 
ary Society, is sent to help schools in India, 
in China and in our own country. Surely 
we all wish to share with others the blessings 
which we enjoy. We hope for the cooperation 



of all in accomplishing many things during 
the year which is before us. 

Christian Endeavor meeting was lead by 
Ida Laubenstein, President of the Christian 
Endeavor Society on October 20. Her talk 
was very helpful to us all. 

On October 27 Gladys Wilkes, the Vice 
President of our Christian Endeavor Society, 
lead Christian Endeavor. Ida Laubenstein 
sang. 

Mrs. G. M. Winslow led Christian En- 
deavor on November 2. Her talk was a 
splendid one and we are very grateful to her 
for its many helpful suggestions. We wish 
we could more often hear our Principal's wife 
in chapel services and Christian Endeavor 



meetings. 



Mildred Koch '13 and Theresa Gordon '13 
were recent guests at Lasell. Their enthu- 
siasm and ours knew no bounds as we talked 
over the old school days — and in Mildred's 
ca.se future days! 

We have just learned that our former in- 
structor in English, Miss Abby W. Howes, 
is a student this winter in Simmons College 
and is living in Brookline. The good news 
makes us hope that Lasell will see her in the 
near future. 

A full and fascinating account has come into 



LASELL LEAVES 



53 



our hands of the recent wedding of Marion 
Bemis to Mr. Frank A. Schlesinger. Marion's 
new home will be in Worcester, Mass., and a 
host of her old friends join Lasell in congratu- 
lations. 



CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR OFFICERS 

President — Ida Laubenstein 
1st Vice President — Gladys Wilkes 
2nd Vice President — Sara Hammond 
Secretary and Treasurer — Helen Benson 
Committee — Jessie Shepherd, Katherine 
Bingaman, Beatrice Beach, Phoebe Haskell, 
Helen Merrill. 

Don't forget Miss Rand's talk about chapel 
behaviour. It is worth while to be quiet at 
the proper time — some of us know from ex- 
perience. — Beware!! 

If you haven't already subscribed for the 
Leaves do so, and right quick or you will 
regret your delay. Every number is worth 
something to you. 

We want new songs. If the spirit moves 
you, write one and give it to Helen Benson. 

"Don't be snobbish, girls," is Mrs. Martin's 
advice, and it is worth heeding. You will 
always be sorry if you are. 

About eighteen girls went to the Newton 
Hospital Sunday October 25, to sing to the 
sick. This is a good cause, girls, in which you 
will enjoy having a part. Please every one 
join the company. 

During the first part of October the Orphean 
Society was again organized. From the great 
interest that is being shown we may all look- 
forward to a fine concert. 



Miss Mosher of the Y. W. C. A. spoke to 
us at the first missionary meeting of the year 
on October 18, Vilette Peck, President of the 
Society presiding. Miss Mosher 's talk was 
chiefly about the foreign girls with whom 
she comes in contact 'on account of her know- 
lege of their languages. She emphasized 
their great need of friendliness and urged us 
to help the cause in every possible way. 

The Rev. Brewer Eddy, the Honorary Mem- 



ber of 1914 had charge of the Vesper Service, 
October 25. We are all very fond of Mr. 
Eddy and are delighted when Miss Potter 
announces his coming. His talk was very 
interesting and made us all wish to be more 
earnest in all we do. Laura Hale, Nell 
Woodward and Helen Benson sang, accom- 
panied on the violin by Helen Snedeker. 



Never to be forgotten is Henry Turner 
Bailey who explained in a most impressive 
way this portion of John 10: 10: "I am come 
that ye may have life and have it abundantly" 
at Vespers November 8, 1914. The inter- 
est in Mr. Bailey's testimony as to the 
abundant life being the true Christian life 
has rarely if ever, been equalled in the Ves- 
per Services. 



THANKSGIVING DAY 

Day of all the year so blessed. 

Harvest day of wealth and peace, 
May all sorrow be forgotten 

And the year's long trouble cease. 

In the crisp air's frosty stinging; 

In the mellow harvest store; 
In the hoards of golden pumpkins 

And the grain-bins running o'er; 

In the warmth of spicy odors. 

Tempting pantry-shelves piled high. 

Can we read the signs unfailing 
That Thanksgiving Day is nigh. 

Weary of the worldly struggle, 

Claimed by failure or success, 
All today may pause in quiet. 

Trials lost in thankfulness. 

Day of all the year so blessed, 

Hallowed day of long ago, 
May your joyous, cheery fragrance. 

Find in us an answering glow. 

Margaret Allen. 




EDITOR 








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Thanksgiving is here! Thanksgiving is here 
and has brought with it all its troop of bless- 
ings! Even if you had no calendar, could you 
not tell it is this season of the year, just by 
the "feel" of the air, just by the cheery looks 
and hearty joviality of everyone you pass, 
just by the natural "Thanksgiving-y" atmos- 
phere? Now when the days are clear and 
crisp, with just enough frost in the air to set 
every nerve a-tingle and stimulate us to push 
on in whatever we are doing — now is the time 
when we want to take advantage of our oppor- 
tunities, get the most out of life, and return 
in kind, a little bit more, possibly, than we 
receive. 

This year, especially, we have a chance to 
make others than ourselves have a thankful 
Thanksgiving and in this let us do our very 
best! We can begin by remembering the 
Red Cross money-box in the office, every 
day or every week or as often as we start 
down town to have a good time. We have 



so many reasons for being thankful this fall, 
that it is hardly necessary to dwell upon any 
of them, except that that terrible destroyer 
of peace and happiness — war — which is play- 
ing havoc with our cousins across the sea, has 
not yet started its campaign with us. For 
this we are extremely thankful, and we feel 
that .our thankfulness can best be shown by 
doing our best for those who are absolutely 
destitute and hopeless. Don't forget the 
Red Cross Box! 



The editor wishes to thank all the "old" 
girls and other friends of Lasell, for what ever 
bits of news, personal and otherwise, they 
have been so kind as to send in, to help us 
keep the interesting parts of our paper up to 
standard. Although she cannot thank them 
all individually, she trusts that they under- 
stand her appreciation of this show of loyalty 
to their Alma Mater. 




"October's as pleasant as June" when it 
comes to the matter of weddings. At least 
so it would seem from the number of our fair 
Lasell girls who became brides this month. 

On Saturday, October 17th, occurred the 
marriage of Marion MacArthur, '12, to Mr. 
Frank A. King at Albany, N. Y. 

On the 21st of October, Grace Emerson, 
'08 became Mrs. Harley Melvin Cole at Peoria 
111. Mr. and Mrs. Cole will be at home after 
November 15th at Toulon, 111. 

Also on Wednesday, October 21st, oc- 
curred the marriage of Annie Glenn to Mr. 
Richard A. Lockard at Berwick, Pa. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lockard will be at home at Ber- 
wick, Pa., after November 15th. 

Edith Herrick became Mrs. Everett Bar- 
stow Byles on Wednesday, October 28th, at 
West Brookfield, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Byles 
wll be at home after the 10th of February at 
214 Pawtuxet Ave., Providence, R. I. 

On Wednesday, October 28th, occurred the 
marriage of Alice Summers to Mr. Joseph 
Maxwell Stephenson, at Notre Dame, Ind. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson will be at home at 
Park View Apts., Gary, Ind., after Decem- 
ber 1st. 

Lasell's very best wishes are extended to 
these, our latest brides and grooms. 

Cards have been received announcing the 



engagement of Edna Woolson to Mr. Irving 
Carrol Bean. Knowing Edna as we do, we 
have every reason to congratulate Mr. Bean, 
and we are glad to take Edna's word for it that 
she is to be equally congratulated. We shall 
await with eager interest the announcement 
of their wedding day. 

Seldom have we received such sad and 
unexpected word as the message which came 
from Ruth Marston Arey, '06, telling of the 
sudden death of our Ruth Butterfield Jones 
'06 on October 25th. Ruth Arey writes, "I 
can hardly realize that she is gone after only 
six months of happy married life!" 

Lasell joins with the class of '06 in extend- 
ing tender sympathy to this bereaved circle. 

Lasell lost one of its most loyal friends and 
patrons in the passing away, on October 10th, 
of Mr. F. W. Robertson, father of our Eva 
Robertson, at Keene, N. H. Mr. Robertson 
was prominently identified in business circles 
of the city and held many positions of trust. 
Our sincere sympathy is extended to this 
stricken family. 

One of the kindest and most appreciative 
messages which came to us early in this new 
year was from Griselda Downs, reporting a 
delightful summer, to use her own words, 
"packed full of friends and fun," and a loving- 
assurance that she will miss the old school 



56 



LASELL LEAVES 



home and wishes us a very happy and success- 
ful year. We thank her for her good message 
and reciprocate her kind wishes for 1914-15. 

Mabel Jones, '14, called recently with 
Sophie Wendt but did not stay long enough 
for "all of us" to see her. We trust she will 
return soon and stay longer. We would like 
to learn more about the present "doings" of 
this loyal graduate. 

Nellie Youngers', '14, splendid letter came 
a little too late for the October Leaves. By 
this time Nellie is a regular member of the 
University of Nebraska. We wish her God- 
speed in her college career. Among the 
pleasant things in her letter is this high trib- 
ute to her Alma Mater. "I only hope that 
I will be able to live up to all the ideals which 
were formed at Lasell. If I succeed, then I 
am certain that my time spent there was 
worth while." 

"I do wish you a full, happy year at Lasell", 
are the opening words in Agnes Adelsdorf 
Strauss', '12, message, followed with this decla- 
ration, "I want some Lasell news the worst 
way. Enclosed find a dollar for my sub- 
scription to the Leaves. ." She sends special 
love to "dear Miss Nutt." Agnes expresses 
sincere regret that she did not take the 
Household Economics course while at Lasell 
and we only wish we dared to tell one of her 
funny experiences which she nervously re- 
lates. For further particulars, apply to said 
hostess. We very much appreciate Agnes' 
and her husband's kindly greetings. 

Maude Andrews this year is among the 
"home keeping" hearts. We miss her very 
much at Lasell but can understand when she 
writes "I am needed at home" and also kindly 
adds, "I am just thankful that I had the one 
splendid year at Lasell." She is still studying 
and we wish her success in her work and 
thank her for her message. 

Frances Allen reports a beautiful trip 
motoring through New York and Pennsylvania 
and way down to Tennessee, beside driving 
the car through sections of Ohio that she had 
never previously visited. Her trip must 



have been a delightful one and we thank her 
for sharing it with us. 

Helen Thirkield '11 is now attending the 
Ethicultural School in New York City. We 
wish her all success in her new work. We had 
a delightful visit with her mother, Mary 
Haven Thirkield, who has been re-elected na- 
tional president of the Woman's Home Mis- 
sionary Society of the Methodist Church. 
Mrs. Thirkield is one of the most eloquent 
speakers in her denomination and we have a 
justifiable pride in remembering that she was 
at one time a Lasell girl. 

Alice Ballard and her family were kind 
enough to make a detour in their automobile 
trip in order to call at Lasell. She had with 
her a dear little sister whom she hinted would 
some day be a Lasell girl. We were glad to 
meet her parents and later to meet Alice again 
at the Connecticut Valley Lasell reunion. 

Miss Martha Ransom is now a guest of her 
sister, Mrs. Minnie Ransom Wagner. We 
are always glad to welcome this former 
teacher and old Lasell girl. She brings us 
some delightful stories of Martha Hazelet 
Crooks '10 and her "small boy." Elizabeth 
Hazelet and the other Williamsport girls are 
busy as homemakers but find plenty of time 
for social relaxations. 

A host of "old girls" and teachers will 
regret to learn of the resignation of Rev. 
John Matteson from the rectorship of the 
Church of the Messiah, Auburndale. A most 
beautiful word of appreciation appeared in 
the editorial of the "Church Militant." We 
are glad to quote the closing words which we 
know are as true as they are beautiful. 

"And it has been done through these 
twenty-three years by the steady, faithful 
work and by the quiet unostentatious methods 
appropriate to a devoted Christian minister. 
People come and go ; our memories are short ; 
we are members, as someone has said, not of 
parishes but of processions; and we forget. 
It is well therefore to remind ourselves— 
those of us who know the facts of a fine piece 
of Christian work done by a fine character— 



LASELL LEAVES 



57 



whose daily life has been his best sermon — in 
a quiet, suburban village." 

Dorothy Dale Smith stopped in Auburn- 
dale on her wedding journey and called at the 
Seminary. She looked as charming as ever. 
We forgave her short call this time because 
she promised on her next visit to bring Mr. 
Smith with her. 

We have received the announcement of the 
engagement of Margaret Livermore '13 to 
Mr. Clifton M. Hull of Auburn, R. I., and of 
"Polly" Porter to Mr. Samuel Hubbard, Jr., 
of Higganum, Conn. We congratulate both 
these happy couple. 

Lasell joins the community in welcoming 
the new Episcopal rector, the Reverend Harry 
Beal and his wife to Auburndale. We have 
already come into friendly relations with 
Mr. and Mrs. Beal and our best wishes are 
extended to them in their new parish. 



JOKES 

Where was Sister F's mind when in history 
Miss Rand suddenly asked her who was 
Pippin's father? 

Sister answers, "George Martel." 



Another Family: 

"This plant belongs to the begonia family." 
"Oh! And you are taking care of it while 
they are away." — Exchange 



Dr. Morgenthaler in Bible: 
"Who were the first people who went into 
the ark?" 

Bea — "Adam and Eve." 



F. E. says her idea of bliss is to be able to 
talk as loudly as possible and not get "stung." 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Very soon there will be the Leaves annual 
story contest for which prizes of a very 
alluring sort, will be given as rewards for 
two best among those given in. We hope 
that a great many girls will go into this com- 
petition; every good story will be published, 
thus helping our school paper which really 
belongs to, and ought to be loyally supported 
by you girls. Early in the year we offered 
a year's subscription to the paper, as a prize 
for the best account of "First Impressions of 
Lasell," but owing to the number of things 
going on, and the hesitation on the part of 
the girls even to try, the contest was closed 
with the earnest hope that there would be no 
such demonstrations of modesty and self- 
depreciation in this our annual prize contest. 
We know you can do it, if you will. Don't 
fail us! 



To little Marjorie Winslow on October 
twelfth: 

"What day is this, Marjorie?" 
Margorie: "This is a holiday!" 



Where did you go in swimming? N. — In 
the water. 



Just what did Miss Rand mean when she said 
"Come down to the Pool-room tonight?" 



WANTED: A MAN OF ALL WORK 

A colonel wanted a man-servant, so he in- 
serted an advertisement in the local weekly. 
One of the applicants who answered was an 
Irishman. 

"What I want," explained the colonel, "is 
a useful man — one who can cook, drive a 
motor, look after a pair of horses, clean boots 
and windows, feed poultry, milk the cow, 
and do a little painting and paper-hanging. 

"Excuse me, sor," said Murphy, "but what 
kind of soil have ye here?" 

"Soil?" snapped the colonel. 'What's that 
got to do with it?" 

"Well, I thought if it was clay I might 
make bricks in me spare time." 




The September issues of the American 

University Courier and The Herald arrived 

after our October number had gone to press. 

Lasell Leaves gladly acknowledges the Octo- 
ber issues of the following magazines: 

Advance, The Artisan, The B. H. S. Tatler, 
The Black and Red Review, The Clarion, The 
Commerce Caravel, Daedalian Monthly, The 
Daisy Chain, The Elgin High School Mirror, 
The Goldenrod, The Imp, The Iris, The Jabber- 
wock, King Edward's School Chronicle, The 
Lit, The Lotus, The Maroon and White, The 
Mirror, The News, Newton High School 
Review, The Optimist, The Oracle, The Penin- 
goan, Somerville High School, Radiator, The 
Rail Splitter, The Ramble, The Recorder, 
Reflector, The Shamokin High School Review, 
Shucis, The Student, The Tattler, University 
School News, Vail-Deane Budget, The Vindex, 
Dalhousie Gazette. 

The following November numbers have al- 
ready arrived : 

Alpha, The Elgin High School Mirror, The 
Orange and Green, The World. 



WHAT WE THINK OF OTHERS 

The World — Much credit is due your staff 
for the publication of such a well-arranged 
paper. Your cuts and stories are excellent. 
We hope to see you among our Exchanges each 
month. 

The Vindex — Wouldn't it be better if you 
had separate pages for your advertisements, 
and did'nt mix them in with stories, jokes, etc? 

Shucis — Yours is a good paper. "The 
Golden Link" in the October numbr is a 
beautifully written story. 

The Jabberwock — The poem, "The Naughty 
Greek Girl," in your October issue, is very 
clever. Your magazine is one of the best on 
our Exchange table, and we hope to see it 
there regularly. 

The Herald — No table of contents and no 
Exchange Department! Don't let it happen 
again. 

The Iris — "Buying a Hat," in your October 
number is very cleverly written. 

Daisy Chain — No table of contents! 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



59 



The Commerce Caravel is very well illus- 
trated, and is altogether very entertaining. 

The News — The Freshman number is fine, 
but why don't you have more stories? 

The Lit — We would suggest that you have 
a table of contents. 

Newton High School Review — Your cover 
design is very good. 

Vail-Deane Budget — Your October number 
contains several excellent articles, but no 
stories and no exchange column. 

The Oracle — Your paper is well-arranged 
and interesting. 

Reflector — We are glad to welcome you 
among our Exchanges, and hope you will 
visit us every month. Don't you think a 
table of contents and an exchange depart- 
ment would be valuable additions to your 
paper? 

The B. H. S. Tatler— Your athletic depart- 
ment is very complete. The writer of "The 
Song of Death," in your October number, is 
deserving of praise. 

The editorial in the November number of 
The Orange and Green is fine, and contains the 
right note of progress and school spirit. 

The Artisan — You have an Exchange Editor, 
but we fail to find any exchange column in 
your magazine. 

The Lotus — You have a neat little paper, 
but more stories would add to its interest. 

Optimist — You have a splendid magazine; 
we hope to see you often. 

"Even in the October issue of The Rail 
Splitter, is excellent. Your cover design is 
very appropriate. 



WHAT OTHERS THINK OF US 

Lasell Leaves is just brimming full of well- 
written articles about the work accomplished 
and the good times enjoyed by the girls of 
Lasell Seminary. In its Advertisers' Di- 
rectory it offers an arrangement not common 
among school publications. — Somerville High 
School Radiator. 

Lasell Leaves — Your departments, which are 
well-developed, afford us much pleasure. The 



photographs make your paper so interesting. 
— The Lotus. 

Lasell Leaves has extremely clever cuts and 
an abundance of excellent photographs. We 
hope that it will continue to be among our 
Exchanges. — The Jabberwock. 

Lasell Leaves — Your paper is certainly one 
of great interest throughout, to those who 
have the pleasure of reading it. — The Imp. 

Lasell Leaves — A welcome to an old friend! 
As fine as ever. — News (East Orange, N. J.) 

Lasell Leaves — Your paper is certainly 
splendid ; the many photographs and cuts add 
very much to it. Apparantly you are backed 
by good school spirit. — T n e Alpha. 




60 



LASELL LEAVES 



LASELL STUDENTS 

Will Make No Mistakes 
In Depending Upon 

New England's 
Greatest Store 

FOR THEIR VARIOUS NEEDS 

Here one may choose from 
unequaled assortments of 
Clothing Furnishing Rugs Pictures 
Artwares Trunks and Luggages 

and the many other things so frequently 
needed during college days 



Best of all, selection here is never from 
commonplace stock but from the best that 
Europe and America can produce 

Jordan Marsh Company 



New Winter Apparel 

For Misses and Young Ladies 




Suits, Coats, Furs> 

Gowns, Blouses, 

Hats 

Chancer & Co. 

151 Cremont street, Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



61 



C. F. Hovey Company 

Summer, Chauncy and Avon Streets 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Bach-lor-Girl Stockings 

These trade-marked stockings are made of the 
most durable imported yarns, and we believe 
them to be the best wearing stockings pro- 
duced at this weight. We guarantee each pair. 

Manufactured for and Sold Exclusively by 

C. F. HOVEY COMPANY 

No. 29L — "Bach-lor-Girl" Guaranteed Stock- 
ings; gauze weight, silk lisle with extra spliced 
heel and toe; in black, tan and white. 



Box 
of 



3 pairs 
lor 



$1.00 



No. 29 — "Bach-lor-Girl" Guaranteed Stock- 
ings; lightweight cotton with extra spliced heel 
and toe; black only. 



Box 
of 



3 pairs 
tor 



$1.00 




The Plastic S'hoe 



(Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 




In Low or High Cut 
and also in Pumps 



The Plastic Shoe 
is the result of 30 
years of study in 
the search for a 
shoe that will help 
all foot troubles and 
still retain a grace- 
ful appearance. 

The Plastic Shoe 
assists one to walk 
as nature intended. 
It removes the 
strain and ache 
resulting from walk- 
ing or standing in 
fitting shoes. 



Thayer, McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



When You Visit Lasell Stop at 



NYE PARK INN 



46 GROVE STREET 



Between the Seminary and Station 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



62 



LASELL LEAVES 



CHINA AND GLASS 

The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in this line 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glas9 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits every season by our buyers to the 
best makers in Great Britain, France, Germany, Austria and Amer- 
ica. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery ffcfit 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS Gallery 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Go. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

FRANKLIN, COR. HAWLEY ST., BOSTON 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 

Compliments of 
GEO. J. BARKER LUMBER CO. 

WALTHAM, MASS. 

George C. Folsom 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 

W. F. HADLOCK 
Newsdealer and Stationer 

Developing and Printing 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

GAPODANNO & ALBANO 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco. 

331 AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Tel. Con. 

C. A. DONOVAN 

345 AUBURN STREET AUBURNDALE 

Ladies' and Men's Furnishings 
Dry Goods and Small Wares 

ELLIOTT W. KEYES 
PHARMACIST 
Drugs- Medicines-Chemicals-Choice Confections 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 



HAYDEN 

WELLESLEYfSOUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 

College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 

COTTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 
CAPS and GOWNS! 

to the American Universities and 
Colleges, to Lasell Seminary and 
scores of other Academies. 

CLASS CONTRACTS A 
SPECIALTY. 

PULPIT and CHOIR GOWNS. 



ilewion Tee Company 

MILLER BROS. 

Address!" Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 



PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Receipts 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 PORTLAND STREET, BOSTON 
Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for Price List of over 60 kinds 





CARDS AND GIFTS 

The Ne^ir ^lao$3> 

149 TREMONT ST., ROOM 923, BOSTON, MASS. 

Waists and Dresses Made at Low Prices 
WAISTS $3.50 DRESSES $8.00 & $10.00 

G. W. THOMPSON & CO. 
Jflufitc Bcalerg 

Announce their Removal to 

2B Park Street, Boston. Te3. Haymarket 1150 

Three doors above their old store. Send for our recent 
catalogues. Mail orders filled the same day as received. 
Music sent on selection if desired. 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



63 



SOCIAL STATIONERY 

INVITATIONS PROGRAMS 

DANCE ORDERS AND 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 



38 WEST STREE 



/ Two ) 
\ Stores / 



7 PEMBERTON SQ. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



.~ irr-^vrr r -■:.-; r?- -lrnaaE 



Our New Booklet Describing 

Lombard Specialties For 
College Girls 

is Now Ready. 
We will be glad to send you a copy. 




Ladies are delighted 

with the results of using Camp- 
bell's Stain on Floors, Furni- 
ture and Woodwork. 

Gives superb finish, brings out 
the natural grain of the wood. 
Write for color card 

Carpenter-Morton Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Established 1882 



Middy Suits— Norfolk Suits- 
Outing Suits in Serge and Linen 

Silk Waists — Mackinaws- 
Blouses — Rain Coats — Sweaters 



Henry S, Lombard 

22 to 26 Merchants Row 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Incorporated 1904 



GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Cositumersi 

6 Boylston Place, Boston, Mass. 

College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Oxford 145 



jUaugusi 
printing 
Company 

Mclleslep 
jfflassacljusieits 



64 LASELL LEAVES 



STOP AND READ 



TJIn a few weeks the new number of the 
Allerli will be ready for distribution. This will 
be without doubt the finest school publication that 
has ever been issued by a class at Lasell. 

IfThe book will contain more than 200 pages 
with over 1 50 new illustrations of school life. 



In order to insure your subscription please 
see Florence Evans at once and leave your order. 



"DON'T WAIT 
Class of 1915 



* » 



Telephones Haymarket 2311-2312 



Flowers 
of Quality 



HOUGHTON- GORNEY CO. 

:-: Florists :-: 



119 TREMONT STREET, 

[Park Street Church] 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Specialty 

Flower Shop of Boston 



FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED TO ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Free Delivery to Lasell 









1 




■HMNI 



TWO STUDIOS 



164 
TREMONT 
STREET 
Telephone Ox- 
ford 2687 





RT in relation to PORTRAIT 
PHOTOGRAPHY is the 

realization of beauty, grace and 
intelligence, as expressed in the finished 
portrait. 

Our advanced 1915 styles we honestly believe 
will appeal to you. Special discount rates to 
all Lasell Students. 



161 

TREMONT 

STREET 

Telephone 

Oxford 858 



SI 



Our Stock Never Gets Old 

NEW GOODS ARRIVE EVERY DAY 



Diamonds 
Watches 
Silver Goods 
Combs 
Cut Glass 
Coral Jewelry 
Roman Pearls 
Ebony Goods 



Vanity Cases 
Photo Frames 
Leather Goods 
Fountain Pens 
Brass Goods 
Chafing Dishes 
Percolators 
Parisian Ivory 



Our Watch and Jewelry Repair Departments do 
the best work at very low prices 



CHARGE 
ACCOUNTS 

OPENED 



MR. F. F. DAVIDSON 
AUBURNDALE 



LASELL LEAVES 



65 



A. SHUMAN & CO. 



The Service Store, Boston 



Tailored Apparel for 
College Girls of 
Rare Distinction 

Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabrics — 

Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 

Splendid Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



We Can Please Yoa 

Come and See for Yourselt 

Dry Goods, Small Wares, Dress Goods, Silks, 
Velvets, Linings, Laces, Gloves, Ribbons, Hand- 
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description. 



P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-135-137-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 



: =S\ 



Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

13 V 2 Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



SJ 



THE ONE GREAT TREASURE 

FOR EVERY STUDENT 

The Family Music Book 



800 PAGES 
CLOTH 




252 PIECES 
BOUND 



Contains $150 worth of music — vocal 
and instrumental. 

(Transit to Lasell 10 cents extra) 

Circular with complete information sent 
upon request. 

THE BOSTON MUSIC CO. 

26 and 28 West Street Boston, Mass. 

publishers THE g M q EDITION 



66 



LASELL LEAVES 



Nearly a Century in 

CARPETS and RUGS 

Few concerns in this country have so long a business 
record and none in Floor Coverings. 

A large, well selected stock, shown by experienced 
salesmen and the same methods that won the respect and 
patronage of parents and grandparents we believe will 
prevail with the present generation. 

Quality considered, it is our purpose not to be under- 
sold by any of our competitors. 

Everything in Floor Coverings 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

646-650 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St. 



Meyer Jonasson & Go 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS.. BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Waists, Furs and Sweaters 



GARMENTS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 
A SPECIAL FEATURE 




Correct Overgaiter Effects 



This model comes in 
Patent Leather o r 
Gun Metal, Spanish 
heels, and Cloth or 
Leather Tops in Gray, 
Black and Fawn. 

PRICES $6 TO $12 

10% cash discount to 
students and faculty of 
Lasell. 



160 Tremont Street, Boston 




FASCLL ftWES 



DUX FEMINA FACTI 



Vol. XXXX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., DECEMBER, 1914 No. 3 

Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 


LIST OF OFFICERS 


Subscription Editor 


FLORENCE EVANS 


Editor-in-chief 
NELLIE WOODWARD 


FRANCES HARRIS 


CAROL RICE 


Associate Editors 
Art Editor 


DORIS WALLER 


Local Editor 


EDITH HODGES 


Exchange Editor 


HELEN BENSON 

Assistant 


Art Editor, CHARLOTTE 


MAUDE HAYDEN 
WHITING 

Assistant Exchange Editor 




Personal Editor 


ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 


istant Local Editor ROSE BAER 


CATHARINE CARTER 


Staff Photographer BESSEMERINI 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (Including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 



Fun Time" (frontispiece) 68 

Literary 69 

Locals 78 

Things Worth While _ 81 



Personal 83 

Editorial 87 

Exchanges — 89 

Supplement 91 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar Inside front cover 

Thomas Long I nside front cover 

A. Shuman & Co. 65 

Pinkham & Smith 65 

P. P. Adams . . _ 65 

Schirmer . . .. _ 65 

T. E. Moseley Co. _ . 66 

Meyer Jonasson & Co. ._ 66 

John H. Pray & Sons Co. .66 

Chandler & Co. _ 97 

Jordan Marsh Co. .97 

Thayer, McNeil Co. 98 

C. F.Hovey & Co. ... .98 

English Tea Room . 98 

Nye Park Inn .. .. 98 

A. T. Bridges .. 99 

The New Shop 99 



C.W.Thompson 99 

Cottrell & Leonard 99 

W. F. Hadlock 99 

Capodanno & Albano 99 

C. A. Donovan 99 

Elliott W. Keyes 99 

Hayden . —99 

Newton Ice Co -99 

Geo. J. Barker Lumber Co. -- 99 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton 99 

George C. Folsom 99 

Damon 100 

H. S. Lombard _ --100 

Carpenter Morton -- 100 

George P. Raymond 100 

Maugus Printing Co. 100 

Houghton-Gorney Co. Inside back cover 








TUN TIME" IN THE STUDIO 




GRETCHENS CHRISTMAS 

"How tiresome!" Gretchen pouted. "Here 
we have just finished cleaning and baking 
for Thanksgiving and now Christmas is only 
a few weeks off. All that to do over again!" 

Mrs. Purdy looked at her discontented 
young daughter and smiled. 

"Perhaps, dear, when you are as old as I, 
you will think differently. But come, be my 
own little girl and help me prepare these 
brown Christmas cakes; you know they do 
not taste just the same unless they are made 
early." 

With a sigh Gretchen returned to the 
work; but that afternoon as she reluctantly 
busied herself with her sewing she though 1 it 
all out. It was absolutely foolish, to go to so 
much trouble for Christmas. What was the 
use of baking and cooking weeks beforehand? 
What was the use of sewing and working so 
msily on presents? Why did those thought- 
less boys come home from school for two weeks 
land upset the house so? They never appre- 
ciated all the preparations but always wanted 



a good time and, she concluded, that was why 
they were so glad to get home. Well — she 
didn't like the Christmas idea at all and that 
was all there was to say. 

The next weeks seemed fairly to fly along. 
When Gretchen and her mother were not 
busy baking the many kinds of cookies, the 
spicy fragrance of which filled tl:e whole 
house, they were tidying up the boys' rooms, 
cleaning the parlors, hurrying packages into 
closets and doing hundreds of other things. 

At times it did pass through Gretchen's 
mind while her curly head was bent over her 
sewing, that it was rather fun — all this ex- 
citement and preparation but the next minute 
the idea was banished. What was the pur- 
pose of it all anyway? 

Only a few more days until Christmas now, 
and any minute the boys would be home bring- 
ing with them their chum who often came 
home with them over vacations. 

"I wonder" — began Gretchen to herself. 
For a minute she forgot to listen to her Mother 
singing in the kitchen; forgot about the last 



70 



LASELL LEAVES 



stitch in her work, and gazed dreamily into 
the fire. "Will John come? Will he like the 
handkerchief I have made for him? Will 
he?" Before she could finish she was aroused 
by a whoop from small Jane and Peter. The 
boys had come home — and with them John. 

Gretchen and John always had much to 
write about in their letters but somehow or 
other now all conversation seemed to halt. 
Luckily the boys relieved their embarras- 
ment by suggesting a walk into the hills. 

No one could be idle long at this busy time 
of year. So in the morning they formed 
groups to hunt through the hills for ever- 
green which in the afternoon they hung 
throughout the house until finally every fire- 
place, doorway and step rail was prettily 
decorated in red and green. 

At last it was December the twenty- 
fourth. Father came from the hills with a 
load of something which was hustled back of 
the closed doors behind which only Mother 
was allowed to go. 

That afternoon, the children, coming slyly 
from their rooms, brought their own simple 
Christmas contributions to Mother who 
carried them into the enchanted room. Later 
on the boys drove Gretchen, Jane and Peter 
to all the houses down by the river. Here 
John was always the first to help Gretchen 
into each house with her huge basket of 
goodies. 

The Purdys, like most of their neighbors 
celebrated their Christmas on Christmas eve 
the time, when, many years ago the wise 
men and shepherds followed the star to gaze 
at the little Christ child. So when the merry 
crowd reached home they found their Christ- 
mas dinner awaiting them. It did seem rather 
hard to have that closed door staring at 
them and to hear all sorts of exciting noises, 
but everything tasted so good. 

Wasn't Father ever going to finish his pie? 
Wasn't Mother ever going to come from be- 
hind those doors? Even Gretchen was ex- 
cited altho, it wasn't all just Christmas ex- 
citement. 



The door bell rang. That was the sign! 
Santa had gone and Uncle Jack threw open 
the doors. Oh, wonder of wonders! There 
stood that queen of Christmas trees with its 
twinkling candles, glittering ornaments and 
rosy apples. There in the fire place was the 
immense Yule log, from which a delightful 
odor spread throughout the room. 

Along the walls were the tables with plates 
heaped high with nuts, apples, doughnuts 
and sugar men, surrounded by mounds of 
packages for each one. Before the eager 
children could discover what Santa had 
brought them, the whole family must join 
hands about the tree and sing their old sweet 
Christmas Carol. 

Then for the presents, and goodness, what 
a scramble! It was, "Oh, isn't this be-oo- 
ti-ful! Why, this is just what I wanted! Isn't 
everyone good to us?" until at last the entire 
floor was strewn with white paper and colored 
ribbons and Jane was beginning to nod off 
to sleep with her new dolly clasped tightly 
in her arms. 

"Well, where is Gretchen?" asked Mother 
suddenly looking around at her excited flock. 

Everyone had been too busy to notice her 
but when Father and Mother looked out of 
the window later, they saw the answer to 
her question. Outside on the snow covered 
path, under the clear, star-sprinkled heavens 
stood Gretchen and John. 

No more did the thought of Christmas 
duties tire Gretchen. No more did she 
wonder why people worked so hard in pre- 
parations. She had found the answer to her 
question in a new love. 

A little later, after the others had gone to 
bed, Gretchen watched her Mother straighten 
up the room, busy again after these few hours 
of enjoyment. With a happy little sigh she 
began helping her, and at her Mother s 
questioning glance only smiled and said, 
"I understand better now, Mother." 



LASELL LEAVES 



71 



THE EUROPEAN TRIP 

( Continued from November Leaves ) 
Our next day's journey brought us by 
way of Como and Milan to Venice. The 
last train ride was a hot, dusty one and we 
were glad enough to take an hour's gondola 
ride to the hotel on the Grand Canal. Venice 
was as pictures and descriptions had always 
told us it would be. It is like the Land of 
the Lotus-eaters, a place where it seems to 
be always afternoon. Here we met Miss 
Shepherd's party and it seemed good to chat 
with Mrs. Martin who felt that she had seen 
plenty of ruins for they had just come from 
Rome. 

While in Venice we visited St. Mark's 
Cathedral, the interior of which to me, has 
the effect of solid mosaic work and the palace 
of the Doges with its masterpieces by Titian 
and Tintoretto. In the evening we took 
gondolas and listened to some native singers 
who move about on the canal. We went to 
see lace making and decided that only clever 
fingers would be successful at it. One after- 
noon we spent at Lido, an amusement center 
with a bathing beach where two of the girls 
had a swim in the Adriatic. It was very 
warm and we rather dreaded going farther 
South but coming events were to prove how 
fortunate we were to be in Italy even in 
August. 

On the morning of July 28th we went 
hurrying back across the salt marshes (where 
an enterprising agent of made-in-America 
goods had posted a large Heinz 57 varieties 
sign) , and so southward to Florence a city of 
intense interest. Here we visited the Ponte 
Vecchio and then the Ufizzi gallery where 
art treasures are counted by thousands. In 
the afternoon we took a drive into the su- 
burbs to the church of San Miniato, down to 
the Michael Angelo Terrace and back to 
Santa Croce. In Italy our history of art 
lessons were right valuable. We went to 
see how Florentine mosaics were made, visited 
the Cathderal, the Baptistry to see Giberti's 
bronze doors, and the Pitti palace. One 



afternoon some inspected the apartments of 
the King and Queen and the Public Gardens 
while others discovered an American book- 
store and a nice tea room. Another day we 
saw the church of Santa Maria Nouvella, 
the monastry of San Marco where lived Fra 
Angelico and Savonarola. We saw the 
National Gallery, the Museum and the 
Foundling Hospital where Andrea della Rob- 
bias bambinos form part of the exterior 
decoration. 




A BIT OF ITALIAN SCENERY 



In Florence we met friendly fleas whose 
liking for us was even greater than that of 
Venetian mosquitoes. Florentines ceem to 
find the day only an uninteresting preface 
to the night either for business or pleasure or 
perhaps they sleep through the heat of the 
afternoon for the night is too noisy for 
average rest. 

Passing from Florence to Rome we arrived 
on the evening of August first, tired by the 
heat and anxious for our week-end mail. 
After letters and dinner we spent the evening 
listening to a band concert, nor did we learn 
of the declaration of war until the next 
morning. Even then we felt that all would 
be satisfactorily adjusted and as we had 
planned to stay a week in Rome we started 
our program by spending a morning in the 
Sistine chapel and the Vatican gallery far 
from war or rumors of war. 



72 



LASELL LEAVES 



That night we were told that communica- 
tion from Italy by land or sea was impossible. 
Tuesday, August fourth we spent the morning 
in the Roman Forum which was explained 
to us in full and interesting detail. But our 
minds dwelt uneasily upon the latest modern 
happenings, the news that there were a thou- 
sand American tourists in Rome, some of 
whom were penniless; that of all securities 
only American express checks were negotiable 
and those only up to two hundred dollars; 
that while Italian steamers were sailing their 
passenger lists were full to the first of October. 

In spite of worry we tried to make the days 
profitable. We visited St. Peter's, the Cata- 
combs, the Church of St. John the Lateran 
and the Colosseum. Two of the girls became 
consul's assistants, tabulating and making out 
statistics concerning Americans in Rome for 
whom anxious cablegrams were coming in. 
Roman streets were very quiet. Economy 
was the order of the day. One afternoon we 
went to the Pantheon and to the church 
where Guido Reni's Crucifixion is hung. This 
is the finest Crucifixion I have seen. Later 
we saw the horrible rooms in the Capuchin 
monastry which are decorated with designs 
made from the bones of four thousand monks. 
One night I saw the Colosseum by moonlight 
and instead of listenting to a lion's roar as 
in early Christian days, listened to a lyric 
soprano solo sung by a member of a party 
directly opposite us in the great amphitheatre. 

August seventh came the definite news of 
the American appropriation of two and a 
half million dollars for relief of stranded 
citizens and the authority to make arrange- 
ments for transportation. Italian soldiers 
were as common as citizens on the streets; 
they were mobilizing on the Northern bor- 
der and we bounced out of bed several morn- 
ings wakened by the steady tramp of march- 
ing feet. It was daily expected that Italy 
would declare war and then our stay might 
be indefinite. Finally we learned that three 
Italian steerage boats, newly fitted up were 
to sail from Naples. The passage through 



the Strait of Gibralter was reported mined 
but with no sign of a peaceful settlement of 
the great quarrel among nations America 
seemed indeed the Land of Heart's Desire. 

After two weeks in Rome we went to Naples 
In contrast to the weird quiet of Rome, 
Naples was very animated. From our hotel 
balcony we looked directly out over the bay. 
Vesuvius at our left, sending up its blue smoke 
cloud by day and sometimes fire at night was 
rather awe-inspiring. 

The San Giovanni, the first of the New York 
bound, Sicula Americana ships sailed the day 
after we got to Naples unmercifully crowded, 
and according to reports, with less comfortable 
quarters than those of the San Guglielmo 
for which we were listed but it was nerve- 
racking to have any ship get away and not be 
among those on board. 

After that boat left we settled down again 
to bright sunshiny days, took an afternoon 
for driving through the Neapolitan poor 
section, then up out of the city which slopes 
from the waterfront to much higher ground 
through vineyards and lemon groves to a 
point where we looked down over the city and 
bay. As we drove back the sun was setting 
over the bright tints of the Italian valley. 
We were back in time to view fashionable 
society taking its regular airing by driving 
along the waterfront and passing our balcony. 

Thus in a few hours we had seen rich and 
poor in their contrasted settings. One feature 
of Neapolitan street life which I thoroughly 
enjoyed was watching the donkeys whose long 
ears belied their serious minded expres- 
sions and who were not at all excited scarcely 
interested in the frenzied "Ahs!!!" of their 
drivers. These little beasts carry unheard of 
loads, the smaller they are in body, the longer 
seemingly their ears grow, and the more 
solemn their aspect is. 

From Naples, too, we went for a side trip 
to Pompeii through perfect clouds of fine gray 
dust, past frames of macaroni drying in the 
sun especially at Terra Amminciata which is 
said to produce more than any other place in 



LASELL LEAVES 



73 



the world. One's imagination staggers as 
one walks in the streets of Pompeii, a city 
buried in volcanic ashes for centuries, now open 
to the light of day, preserved with details of 
its life as clear as if the catastrophe had been 
within a generation. On its streets are ruts 
in the stone pavements worn by chariot wheels 
The fresco decorations in some houses are 
clear and distinct. Through these the old 
manners and customs can be traced; but the 
silence of it all is uncanny and melancholy. 
Lizards shoot away before a passing foot and 
bright little red flowers and morning glories 
grow in crevices of the stones. 




j --:lfip.-^ 



THE THEATRE AT POMPEII 

From Pompeii we drove most of the after- 
noon along the beautiful sea road that winds 
in and out around points of land toward 
Sorrento. As we went along we saw on high 
points standing out against the sky great 
wooden crosses erected by monks of the holy 
orders. 

That evening after a long climb, we stayed 
at Ravello a kind of earthly paradise from 
the standpoints of location and beauty of 
land and sea. Here we found generous hos- 
pitality and rest for body and mind. But 
all too soon the time passed. We left this 
ideal spot for the valleys once more and driv- 
ing through the quaint fishing town of Amain 
came finally to Sorrento from which we had 
hoped to take a trip to the Blue Grotto of 
Capri . 



But since wind and weather proved un- 
favorable some of the party were whirled 
away again to see the villa of F. Marion 
Crawford and a Capuchin monastry, some of 
us discovered beautiful inlaid wood to carry 
back to Naples. We had all sorts of tire 
troubles and shower troubles on our way 
back but nothing really dampened our enthu- 
siasm and we reached Naples again about 
seven in the evening after two of our very 
happiest days. 

Saturday, August twenty-second the San 
Guglielmo sailed from Naples at 10.20 in the 
evening. As the ship swung round and out 
into the bay we could hear children on the 
dock still singing Santa Lucia, the Neapolitan 
boat song. It was a beautiful night and the 
lights of Naples shone like jewels against a 
velvet background. We watched them fade 
and disappear into the night - - another 
memory. 

The following day and for that matter 
many other days were spent in earnest en- 
deavor to improve conditions on board and in 
making everyone as comfortable as possible. 
With few exceptions good humor was unfail- 
ing and we met in the friendliest way many 
fine people. Common misfortune makes an 
excellent friendship cement. The ship made 
good time, the sky was blue but no bluer than 
the sea. 

At eleven on the third day out we sighted 
Gibralter and passed without interruption ex- 
cept that a torpedo boat slid swiftly through 
the water after us for about twenty minutes, 
but after talcing a critical survey it turned and 
waving us a friendly farewell shot back toward 
the gray fortress. On the left a blue outline 
of the African coast could be seen. The sea 
was very smooth. We were actually leaving 
Europe beyond possibility of recall and we 
were happy in spite of discomforts. 

On the whole we had fine weather although 
the days during which we were crossing the 
Gulf Stream were very damp and close. 
While there the ship did a good deal of rolling. 
Much of the way a strong wind blew against 



74 



LASELL LEAVES 



us. It was fun to stand up in the prow and 
watch the boat meet the waves rolling toward 
it. The nights were usually gorgeous, the 
moon was nearing the full and many slept 
on deck in their chairs or on the canvas tops 
of the lifeboats. We seldom sighted a ship 
and had almost no wireless news except fake 
messages gotten up for excitement. 



that he stood in a momentarily free corner 
and frequently crossed himself. Truly the 
ways of the American traveler seemed past 
understanding. 

One morning we had a far distant view of 
the Azores; the land looked like a queer cloud 
which proved to be the top of a mountain with 
its base obscured by mists. As we moved on 



Amalfi. Panorama daH' Albergo Cappuccini. 




Music and recitations helped to pass the 
afternoons in the little saloon. One evening 
we had a regular concert with a singer from 
the New York Metropolitan Opera. Deck 
sports were impossible and promenading was 
difficult because of lack of room. I think we 
must have been a never failing source of 
amusement to the Italian service when they 
had free moments. This, however, was seldom 
for they served meals to three different sittings 
of people three times a day beside an attempt 
at afternoon tea on deck. One steward in the 
big dining room was so confused on the first 
night of the trip, by unintelligible commands 



the uneven but low outline of coast was seen. 
From there we saw no more land until on j 
September third about four in the morning | 
we caught a glimpse of America. That sun- 
rise was beautiful in every sense. When thel 
pilot came out and business men yelled fori 
world news, the first given, apparently thej 
most important on hand, was that of stand- 
ings in the baseball league. 

O sweet and blessed country where war wasl 
not the greatest reality! Miss Liberty stand -J 
ing in the harbor, how familiar and dear sh( 
seemed! The pier at Brooklyn was draped 
with flags and as we came nearer the strain^ 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



75 



of "Home, Sweet Home" and the "Star 
Spangled Banner" made our hearts swell un- 
comfortably. 

Eagerly we scanned the watching crowd and 
hoped that all was well with our dear ones 
from whom we had heard nothing in a long 
five weeks. 

So at Pier 22 in Brooklyn we said good 
bye to the dear chaperone and to the others 
who had shared our busy and eventful travels. 

Susan Tiffany. 



A PLAYFUL STORY 

"Little Miss Brown" lived "Way Down 
East" in "The Old Homestead," which her 
father had "Bought and Paid For" many 
years ago. Many people passed the mansion 
to go to "The Trail of the Lonesome Pine," 
which was near "Uncle Tom's Cabin." 

"Little Miss Brown" was one of "Three 
Twins" and the people called her "The 
Sweetest Girl in Dixie," while others named 
her "The Rose Maid" as her cheeks were like 
a "Red Rose." 

One evening when this "Litle Miss Fix-it" 
was looking at the "Rainbow" with "The 
Little Minister" as an escort she received a 
letter from "Madame X" who lived "Forty- 
five minutes from Broadway" on "The Road 
to Happiness," to come and spend "Three 
Weeks" with her. "Little Miss Brown" 
accepted the invitation of "The Fascinating 
Widow" and started out on her visit. 

She had to go "Over the River" which was 
"The Great Divide" "In Old Kentucky" and 
take a train. She became confused when she 
arrived at the station so she approached 
"The Travelling Salesman" who was called 
"Grumpy" and he told her "The Easiest 
Way" on the train. She had to stay "Over 
Night" on the train until the next morning 
when she arrived at the home of "The Merry 
Widow." It really seemed to her that she had 
been traveling about "Seven Days." 

The home of the widow was on (the) an 
avenue which led from "Broadway to Paris" 



It was called "The House of a Thousand 
Candles." 

The first night that "The Rose Maid" was 
there "Madame X" took her to "The Con- 
cert" which was held in "The Winter Gar- 
den." "Little Miss Fix-it" was overjoyed 
to meet "The Gentleman from Mississippi" 
whom she had met once before at the "Charity 
Ball." She also saw "The Girl from Rec- 
tor's" who was strikingly dressed in "The 
Deep Purple" which was all the rage. "Mad- 
dame X" introduced "The Rose Maid" to 
"The Music Master" who was the leader of 
"The Concert." "Little Miss Fix-it" was 
also delighted to meet "The College Hero" 
who sang "The Rosary." He was "The Little 
Millionaire" and was known by his friends 
as "The Rich Man's Son." At times "The 
College Hero" was "The Private Secretary" 
of a large concern, his office being in "Room 
444." 

"The Spendthrift" became very much in- 
terested in "The Rose Maid". One day, 
while walking in "The Garden of Allah," they 
approached a newly painted settee and were 
about to sit down when "Along Came Ruth" 
and "Disraeli." The latter said, "Excuse 
Me" but "Mind the Paint Girl." They were 
so much interested in each other that even 
"The Passers By" heard pet names such as 
"Bright Eyes" and "Baby Mine." 

Time elapsed and soon a wedding was held 
in "The House of a Thousand Candles." 
"The Little Minister" from "Way Down East' 
came to perform the ceremony. "Rebecca of 
Sunnybrook Farm ' made a pretty brides- 
maid and "The Fortune Hunter" a handsome 
best man. 

What became of "The Spendthrift" and 
"Little Miss Brown" after "The Honeymoon" 
is certainly "The Million Dollar Mystery.' 

A MERjF? 

All the p/eparations jwere complete ; the 
Christmas ship, VaWfifSwis^r^ady^oisail. 
It steamed rtonij the docl>s^,^ K ^ew York, 




76 



LASELL LEAVES 



amid the cheers and farewells of the throngs 
on the wharf, bearing away to the struggle in 
Europe, the faithful ones who had agreed to 
devote their skill to benefit the suffering. 

One young woman who wore on her sleeve 
the red cross insignia seemed to be standing 
a little apart from the other groups and to be 
buried in thought. Her sweet young profile 
was clearly outlined against the snowy clouds 
behind. One could easily see that she was 
blinking fast to keep back the too ready tears 
and trying to keep up her courage and face 
the new situation with a smile. 

This was little Ellen Madison who had only 
two months previous made her debut in 
New York Society circles. Her popularity 
was not alone confined to New York but her 
generosity and kindness had made her known 
all over the East. Now she, the only child of 
James Madison, the wealthy mine owner, 
was leaving all to go forth to a field to which 
she felt herself called. 

The ship had been out scarcely half the 
night when the cries of a child pierced the 
stillness of the calm deep. Where these 
sorrowful little wails came from was indeed a 
mystery, and immediately some half dozen 
men appeared to discover if possible the 
whereabouts of the child. It was not a 
difficult task, as the sturdy little youngster 
had evidently been a number of hours with 
nothing to eat. There he was, behind a bench 
at the bow of the boat, securely wrapped in a 
warm furry blanket having no mark of iden- 
tification. 

Then the question was, what they were to do 
with a child who was perhaps a year and a half 
old. While two or three of the younger men were 
running to and fro, not knowing just what to 
do or which way to turn, Ellen, who had been 
restless and wakeful, stepped from the sa- 
loon expecting to take a little fresh air. 
No sooner was she seen than several men 
practically carried her towards the baby 
which put out its tiny arms to her. When 
Ellen was able to get her breath, she hugged 
the child to her and cuddled it saying: 



"Oh what a perfectly adorable little darling! 
Whose is he?" 

"That, madam, is just what we would like 
to know," replied the big fatherly doctor who 
had first discovered the child. 

After a short discussion Ellen persuaded 
the doctor to let her have the care of the child 
until they should be able to give him into bet- 
ter hands. She took the baby to her room, and 
after doing everything that at least twenty 
young women had suggested, succeeded in 
putting him to sleep. Ellen then busied her- 
self in looking over the little garments for 
some mark or name. These tiny clothes were 
of the very sheerest and loveliest material 
and showed that the child must have come 
from a home of luxury. While watching the 
baby Ellen fell asleep and did not awaken till 
morning when she heard the baby crying 
and laughing. 

Of course the baby was the center of in- 
terest of the whole boat and brought the en- 
tire party into closer relations by furnishing 
a topic for conversation. 

In its route to England it was necessary 
for the Veladi to touch at Rio de Janeiro in 
order to receive further gifts for the wounded 
soldiers. All the young men and women 
looked forward eagerly to having the chance 
of seeing these strange shores and hearing a 
foreign language. 

Even though the nurses aboard the Veladi 
spent much time in sewing, knitting and tear- 
ing bandages, and the doctors in planning, 
still there remained much time for pleasure 
and enjoyment. Very few days were re- 
quired to make all on board feel as if they be- 
longed to one large family. 

During the afternoon of the thirteenth day 
of the voyage the Veladi had run into a 
rather lively squall which the Captain ex- 
pected they would soon out-distance. In- 
stead of calming down, however, the wind had 
steadily increased, until a heavy gale, and 
later a blinding rain beat upon the tossing ship, 
buffetted here and there by the gigantic waves. 
It seemed as if Neptune's wrath had indeed 



LASELL LEAVES 



77 



been aroused to its utmost. All hands were 
ordered within and all necessary prepara- 
tions were made in the expectation of the 
approaching storm. The dark glowering sky 
seemed to fortell some evil. 

Very few of the passengers were able to 
appear for dinner in the evening, but the 
Captain who was truly "An old sea-dog," as 
his men called him, went about giving a cheer- 
ful word and trying to lift the gloom which 
had settled on the entire ship . 

At about eleven o'clock the ship quivered 
with a mighty shock. All that were able to 
leave their stateroom rushed to the saloon 
to find out if possible the cause, turning over 
afresh in their minds the disaster of the 
Titanic. 

The Captain was at length found working 
fiercely with his men, shouting out his orders 
clear and sharp, "Pump, men! Faster! 
Faster! The bilge has risen an inch! We're 
in for it! Steady there!" 

In an instant the cause of the trouble 
was discovered. The boiler had exploded 
and blown a small hole in starboard. Under 
ordinary circumstances this would have been 
of small consequence. But in the face of a 
raging storm! 

In hardly half an hour a second and greater 
explosion followed. The gong was at once 
sounded for all to asemble in the saloon. The 
Captain talked quietly and told them there 
was no great hurry but that all must be ready 
if necessary, to take refuge in the life boats. 
Although one or two of the younger nurses 
became hysterical, the women in general 
met the situation with remarkable calm and 
self-possession. 

Outside the saloon, however, things wore 
a different aspect; men were hurrying about, 
getting ready the life boats, helping at the 
pumps, showing the same courage as those who 
constantly face the perils of the deep. 

The life-boats ready, seventeen women and 
six men at a time were permitted to embark 
in these frail skiffs upon the black and greedy 



waters. The captain stood by counting each 
person who embarked. 

Eighteen of the twenty life-boats had been 
lowered when a young physician noticed that 
Ellen and the baby had not yet appeared. He 
at once rushed toward her state-room to see 
if by any chance she had failed to hear the 
warning. 

Suddenly the lights all over the ship were 
extinguished making the darkness more in- 
tense by the swift contrast. 

The doctor reached Ellen's room just a 
moment after she had left it. Thinking that 
she had escaped his notice he rushed back 
upon deck just in time to force the captain by 
mighty strength into the last life-boat, and 
to jump in, himself, as it was lowered. 

Ellen had heard the great commotion on the 
deck and taking the child in her arms had 
started to find the cause. Just as she left 
her stateroom the lights had gone out. Feel- 
ing her way cautiously, she reached the deck 
only in time to see the last life-boat swing out 
and go down into the angry sea. 
{To be continued) . 





SENIORS TAKE THEIR PINS 

When the breakfast bell rang Tuesday 
morning, November 24, the Seniors were con- 
spicuous by their absence. They were soon 
found however standing about a table in the 
center of the dining room singing to the 
Juniors. The song was repeated many times, 
each time faster than before. After grace 
was said, the Seniors formally took their 
pins by singing to the tune of "Love's Old 
Sweet Song." 

Just a tiny class pin, 

Just an emblem small, 

But it has a meaning that is dear to all. 

May we ever guard it, 

Pin of dear '15, 

For you are the symbol of each Senior's dream. 

All honor to '15. 

Then the Juniors sang to the Seniors and 
marching lock-step, surrounded their table. 
Before the Juniors took their places, the 
Seniors sang another song, "It pays to Ad- 
vertise." The table, above which hung a 
handsome 1915 banner was very prettily 
decorated with chrysanthemums. The Soph- 



mores presented each Senior with a turkey, 
as a favor. The 1917 officers presented the 
Senior President, Nell Woodward, with their 
class banner, which is to be left in her care 
until they need it. The ties the '15 girls wore, 
need no word, they talked for themselves. 



JUNIORS ANNOUNCE THEIR 
HONORARY MEMBER 

On Wednesday evening, December 9, as 
we came down to dinner we were greeted with 
large posters with "Bangs" on them. As the 
Seniors stood on the balcony and held the 
posters, the Juniors in the dining room, stand- 
ing around several tables, very prettily deco- 
rated with yellow chrysanthemums, sang a 
song to the tune of "Its Always Fair Weather" 
When we were all seated, Marion Beach, the 
Junior President, formally announced John 
Kendrick Bangs as their honorary member. 
Later another stirring song was sung and the 
class marched out, receiving hearty congratu- 
lations at every turn. 



LASELL LEAVES 



79 



SENIORS' "OPEN HOUSE" 

All the undergraduates speak of the good 
time they had at the Seniors' "Open House" 
on November 23. Mrs. Winslow, Miss Potter, 
Miss Warner, Miss Williams and our class 
presidents made a very gracious receiving line. 
Gardner presented a perfect appearance, all 
the rooms looking so well that the under 
classmen are modeling their rooms after them. 
We thank the Seniors for this most pleasant 
afternoon. 



ELECTION OF STUDENT COUNCIL 

The new student council was nominated 
and elected during the last month. The girls 
were nominated in the various classes and 
elected by ballot in the gymnasium on the 
following evening. The election was copied 
after the big state elections as nearly as 
possible. The election was Miss Rand's idea. 
She was assisted by Miss Raymond, Miss 
Warner, Miss True, Helen Gerrett, Frances 
Harris, Ruth Anderson and others. 

The members from the different classes 
for two terms are: 

Seniors, Martha Schuman and Susan Tif- 
fany. 

Juniors, Marian Beach, Mabel Straker. 

Specials, Norma MacMillan, Hala Zach. 

Sophomore, Mary Frances Moore. 

Freshman, Katherine Bowman. 

The members elected for one term are: 

Seniors, MargretheBauman and Nell Wood- 
ward . 

Juniors, Adolphia Garnsey and Carol Rice. 

Special, Gladys Rankin. 

Sophomore, Jessie Shepherd. 

Freshman, Beatrice Beach. 

Preparatory, Helen Moebs. 

The new officers of the student Council are: 
President, Susan Tiffany, Vice-President, 
Martha Schuman, Secretary, Marian Beach. 



a royal good time, however, and with boxes, 
letters and telegrams from home were kept in 
the best of cheer. Wednesday most of the 
girls spent in town at various entertainments. 
Thursday came the big Thanksgiving dinner 
and Friday morning we rested from our vaca- 
tion to be ready to start school at one o'clock. 
The dining room at Thanksgiving presented 
a picture not to be missed. The tables decor- 
ated with flowers, place cards and the menus, 
surrounded by the happiest of people left no 
doubt that vacation at Lasell for those who 
cannot leave school is a thing not to be 
dreaded. Miss Potter's verse written upon 
the menu card was a most fitting one: 

"Can one be thankful when sorrow presses sore! 
And ties of war and carnage sound on every side? 
Yes, deeper than the wild sea's surface sweep 

Is the eternal calm. 
Doubt not, our God is keeping watch; 
Right will prevail. 

Then thank Him for a faith unshaken; 
For hope which changes darkness into light, 
And hails triumphant Right." 

A five piece orchestra furnished music 
during the dinner and at its close played the 
National hymn : when all had sung two verses 
they left the dining room for the gymna- 
sium where the jolliest frolic followed. There 
were guests from different schools and col- 
leges as well as some of the parents of the 
girls. We missed Dr. Winslow's presence, 
and are glad that he is again well. 



THANKSGIVING VACATION AND 
DINNER 

Thanksgiving vacation left but a third of 
•the girls to remain at school. The third had 



On December 7 Mrs. Wagner opened her 
rooms to the Clark Cottage girls who gave 
a silver tea for the benefit of the Red Cross 
Society. Dainty refreshments were charm- 
ingly served by the girls. Twenty dollars 
was received in the box which Miss Shank 
persuasively held out to the guests. 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow received all the girls 
at their home on the afternoon of December 
11. The open fire and the Christmas greens 
all about the rooms made the house most 
attractive. We are sure that no more gracious 
host and hostess than Dr. and Mrs. Winslow 
can be anywhere found. They always do 
things generously and well. 



80 



LASELL LEAVES 



LECTURE BY JOHN KENDRICK BANGS 

Wednesday December eight should be 
marked as one of the most delightful on the 
calendar of enjoyable evenings of this year, 
for John Kendrick Bangs gave at that time 
some of his own Christmas stories. The first 
and the last stories dealt with actual ex- 
periences of the author in New York and re- 
vealed the great heart of Mr. Bangs as well 
as the bitter sorrow of the poor. These 
stories were relieved by a delightfully whim- 
sical one entitled "A Glimpse into the Future" 
but this, too, carried its own message of the 
value of child life. We assuredly hope that Mr. 
Bangs will "come back to school again." 



We all agree most heartily that the Juniors 
have been wise in choosing John Kendrick 
Bangs as their honorary member. We wish 
to thank them for allowing us to print the 
greatly prized greeting which he sent to each 
member of the class: 

"May your Christmas Day be happy, and the dawn 

of New Year bright, 
"May each day that follows after find your pathway 

full of light, 
"May the years that Time shall bring you find your 

spirit ever green, 
Is the wish of your Big Brother in the class of 

Sweet Sixteen." 

The girls have had a great many oppor- 
tunities during the past month to enjoy such 
entertainments as: 

Concert by Sousa's Band — Nov. 17. 

Cyril Maude in Grumpy, Nov. 21. 

Florence Martin in Peg 0' My Heart, Nov 2. 

William Hodge in The Road to Happiness, 
Nov. 28. 

Piano Recital by Heinrich Gebhard, Dec. 9. 



On Dec. 2 the school was invited to a lect- 
ure on the Indians given in the Congregational 
Church by the Rev. Wm. Brewster Hump- 
hrey and his wife. Fascinating songs were 
sung by Mr. Humphrey and the life-story of 
the Indian woman, as shown in her weaving 
and basketry, was interestingly told by Mrs. 
Humphrey. 



Miss Potter's lecture on Etiquette and Good 
Behavior Thursday December 3, was full of 
needed suggestions. We are resolved to heed 
her timely admonitions. 



Mrs. Loomis' final lecture for this year on 
"Bacteriology" was found to be very valu- 
able. It was given on Thursday afternoon, 
November 19. 

The last of a series of five lectures by Dr. 
Leon H. Vincent was given Thursday night, 
November 9. The subject, "Scottish Humor" 
proved an entertaining one. We are sorry 
that Dr. Vincent will not meet with us any 
more this year, as his lectures are always en- 
joyed. 



The girls who attend the Episcopal Church 
tell us of a most enjoyable hour spent at the 
Rev. and Mrs. Beal's "At Home," December 
third. 



RADCLIFFE GAME 

Radcliffe has again invited Lasell to meet 
her at Basket Ball. We are anxiously await- 
ing the game which will take place shortly 
after Christmas vacation. 



WHITE MOUNTAIN TRIP 

Don't forget that the time for the White 
Mountain Trip will soon be here. Ask your 
parents about it the next time you see, or 
write to them. It is a trip no one should miss. 





LASELL MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

The Lasell Missionary Society gave ten 
dollars toward a Thanksgiving dinner for the 
girls of the Willard Settlement in Boston. 

At the Vesper service on November 15 Miss 
Conklin, New York secretary of the Student 
Volunteer movement, helped us to under- 
stand more clearly than ever before the mean- 
ing of this great enterprise. She was assisted 
in the service by Miss George of the Boston 
Y. M. C. A. 

November 22, fifteen Lasell girls spent a 
most happy Sunday afternoon singing to the 
sick in the Newton Hospital. Those that 
did not go then had better see Laura Hale as 
soon as vacation is over for she can tell you 
when there will be another opportunity. 

Sunday night, November 22, the under- 
classmen had an opportunity to attend 
Vespers at the Methodist Church and hear 
the testimonies of some of the men from the 
Dover Street Rescue Mission in Boston. The 
Seniors availed themselves of the opportun- 
ity to hear their honorary member, Robert 
E. Speer speak in the Memorial Chapel of 
Wellesley College. 



On November 29 the Rev. Harry Beal gave 
a most suggestive talk on the "Religious 
Value of a Sense of Humor." 

Vespers on December 6, were lead by Miss 
Roraback who began her talk by thanking the 
Missionary Society for the contribution 
which it gave to the Domestic Science de- 
partment of a school in Alabama. She told 
us of the great work being done among the 
Mountain Whites in some of the Southern 
states. 

December 13 the Lasell Glee Club had charge 
of the Vesper Services, Reverend Brewer Eddy 
being the speaker. The Lasell girls of other 
years surely know what this rare combina- 
tion meant. The three words Mr. Eddy used 
to characterize the love of Christ are worth 
repeating many times: simplicity, attractive- 
ness, irresistableness. 

The Glee Club is surely to be congratulated 
upon their splendid program. Both the 
chorus work and the solo work are deserving 
of great praise. The program was as follows: 



PART I 



PRELUDE 



Organ 



Mrs. W. J. Spaulding 



82 



LASELL LEAVES 



PROCESSIONAL. Hymn 111 
SCRIPTURE READING: Miss Potter 
HYMN 112 
PRAYER 

"0 Lord Most Holy" Cesar Franck 

Solo: Miss Benson 
"The Carol of the Star" Noble 

"Bethlehem Land" Noble 

"Little Town of Bethlehem" Sleeper 

Solo: Miss Hale 
"The Blessed Virgin's Cradle Song" Bairstow 

PART II 

"Voices of the Sky" Broome 

Duet: Misses Lang and MaeMillan 
ADDRESS 

Rev. Brewer Eddy 
"Sleep of the Child Jesus" Gevaert 

"Away in a Manger" Anderson 

Solo: Miss Laubenstein 
"Angels from the Realms of Glory" Shelly 
RECESSIONAL. Hymn 114 



December 8 



THE CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR CALEN- 
DAR 

November 10 Katherine Bingaman's in- 
formal "kindness" meeting 
was a success. Miss Helen 
Snedeker played the violin. 

November 17 Miss Huntington, a school- 
mate of Miss Rand and Miss 
Williams at Smith, told us in 
a most humorous and ap- 
pealing way of her work 
among the mountain whites 
of Kentucky. 

November 24 Catherine Chase lead the 
Thanksgiving prayer meeting. 
A number took part in the 
service. 

December 1 The Christmas songs Miss 
Warner selected for us to sing 
and her talk on broad 
frietidship helped many of us 
to get more of the true Christ- 
mas spirit. 



Miss Rand made us all want 
to begin all over again to play 
the game of life. She sug- 
gested that we consider life as 
a fight; our difficulties and 
faults as enemies. It is for 
us to find proper weapons to 
conquer these enemies and to 
attack them with zest. 



Sunday nights after vespers, Senior House 
is found to be the most popular house at 
Lasell. The cheery fire and the Seniors as 
hostesses are enough to make anyone wish to 
be there. 

The new class banners will be found in all 
the rooms throughout the school. 



The first important part of the "Mem 
books" life has started. From every new girls' 
room comes the request, "Please write in my 
"Mem book?" We shall be glad for the rest 
between Christmas and June when the books 
again become so much in evidence. 



Misses Margaret Jones and Sara Hammond 
deserve hearty thanks for their kindness in 
collecting money from all the girls in the school 
for towels for the Belgians. 



A favorite recreation newly developed with 
the wintry weather, is sliding down the lawn 
in front of Cushman. It is fun when you don't 
get hurt, isn't it, Marie? 



The girls have been very sensible this year, 
about sending flowers. Please keep up the 
good work. 

At Miss Rand's table, the wit of the school 
will be found. Maude Freeman, when a 
remark was made about a certain person 
making faces in the classroom at some one 
else, ending with "she sits there and makes 
faces everyday,;" Maude remarked, "If she's 
so good at making faces she ought to work in 
the Waltham watch factory." 




I was so pleased to receive the November 
Leaves and read with interest the doings of the 
"old" and "new" girls, not to mention the 
dear Faculty. ( I always take a proprietary 
and proud interest in the Leaves, as an erst- 
while offspring of mine, now grown to an in- 
spiring stature, as children will do!) I was de- 
lighted to note that Lasell girls are taking 
part in Red Cross work too. We are busy with 
that work here, everybody is knitting, knit- 
ting, and we all "knittists" or not, are trying 
to help in any way we can. Our money is all 
going to help the soldiers and the poor this 
Christmas. So many of us have friends or 
relatives among the soldiers; already our little 
town has sent more than one hundred men 
with the Canadian Expeditionary forces, some 
at Salisbury Plain, some in preparatory ser- 
vice, on this side, who will sail later. We bade 
them "God speed" with full hearts, feeling 
that they could enlist with no higher motive 
than loyalty to the Motherland. 

I am sure you will all sympathize with 
Katherine Cann Porter ( '04-'05) in the loss 
of her young brother, Malcolm (and my cousin) 
in the Anglo-German Naval battle off Chili, 
November first. He was a midshipman, had 



been promoted to Sir Christopher Crad- 
dock's flagship the "Good Hope, which was 
sent to the bottom with her entire comple- 
ment of nine hundred men. O glorious way 
to die in the service of his country, but, oh, 
such a loss to those to whom he was dear! 
Malcolm was such a favorite with all, bright 
and lovable, and is one of Canada's youngest 
naval heroes, being only nineteen. 

To all Lasell, "old" and "new", I send 
heartiest greetings for a "Merry Christ- 
mas" and "Happy New Year." I am hoping 
to be able to see Lasell in person this winter. 

Madeleine Lovitt '08. 

An interesting announcement comes to us 
from Woonsocket, R. I., telling of the en- 
gagement of Alma Marguerite Harris to Mr. 
Allan Thornton Hanscom. We shall watch 
with eagerness for the sequel to this pleasing 
foreword ! 

The following goodly company of little 
newcomers we are glad to register at 
Lasell: On September 19, Elizabeth Anne 
came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Philip 
Hanna ( Marion Bartlett) ; James Eads arrived 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Levings 
(Clara Eads '93) on October 20; Mr. and Mrs. 



84 



LASELL LEAVES 



Ralph H. Alton (Marion Atwell'07) welcomed 
little George Gilbert on November 8 and on 
November 22, Timothy Fuller arrived at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. Fuller 
(Mildred Peirce '06) . Our congratulations are 
extended to these happy parents. 

Ruth Tuthill is enjoying Smith College very 
much and sends some splendid messages to 
her Lasell friends which thoroughly proves her 
loyalty to her "first love." We are looking 
for a visit from her later. 

That was an "awfully nice" letter Adelaide 
Miller sent from Duluth. We venture to put 
in this opening paragraph; "My! you don't 
know how badly I wanted to come back this 
fall! In fact I don't remember of ever wanting 
anything much more than I did that, but I 
am to return in June unless something happens 
that I do not now expect. * * * Dorothy 
Chaffee Stroud and Emma Christensen have 
both invited me to visit them in Minneapolis 
and I hope to be able to go so as to be there 
for the Twin City Lasell Banquet. Please 
remember me to Doctor and Mrs. Winslow 
and the teachers." 

Wasn't that fine in Juliette Beach '13 to 
spend her Thanksgiving holidays with her 
Alma Mater, and incidentally her sister, 
Marian! We have rarely received a more 
gracious note of appreciation from a recent 
visitor than hers. We especially note that 
sentence, "I have not forgotten the hospital- 
ity which I have always found awaiting me 
from the faculty and the girls. I believe it 
must be a special Lasell brand of hospitality 
for I have never found just that sort anywhere 
else and I think a good many old girls will 
agree with me. " She adds, "On my way home 
I visited Peggy Livermore '13, who is the same 
dear girl and very busy attending to house- 
hold linen and buying furniture" (of course 
we know the reason). "In New Haven I 
called on Genevieve Bettcher '14 and the 
call lengthened into a night and we talked 
Lasell as fast as we could." 



We were glad to "welcome home" Mildred 
Smith '14 and to find her looking perfectly 
well, and, as usual, happy. She reports a de- 
lightful visit with Angeline Emery '14 and 
made us glad with the assurance that later 
she would return bringing her former room- 
mate with her. 

Doris Brien, too, dropped in for a meal. 
We wish we could have kept her longer. 

Orra Hammond '12 has sent the good news 
that her class is to have a reunion at Lasell in 
June. We would be glad to receive like notices 
from other classes. 

Rose Hoefflin's pretty Thanksgiving card 
was followed by a newsy letter. She writes, 
"I haven't forgotten dear Lasell. Have often 
wished that I could return. What I hear 
about the new girls is very pleasing, that more 
of them attend the Christian Endeavor meet- 
ings this year than ever. I miss these meetings 
very much. It was always a pleasure to 
attend for they made the daily program so 
much easier." Rose is taking up elocution 
and piano lessons. She is a real "home 
keeper" this year, relieving her mother in the 
line of domestic duties. 

Mildred Post is now in the editorial de- 
partment of McClure's Magazine in New 
York. Doesn't that sound fine? And what 
is more, she is "making good" as a proof- 
reader. She has our congratulations and 
best wishes for advancement. 

In a letter received from Lillie N. Potter 
from Minneapolis, she writes, "I have just 
returned from a call on Bessie House Mc- 
Millan of St. Paul where I saw her dear 
little daughter, now three weeks old." We 
can now include Bessie among Lasell 's multi- 
millionaires as this is her third daughter and 
she also is the mother of a splendid boy. 
Our congratulations! 

Lela Goodall '08 gladdened us by visiting 
the school for a few hours recently. The 
family have just moved into a beautiful new 
home in Brookline and we are hoping that 



LASELL LEAVES 



85 



later on Lela and her sister will give us more 
than "flying visits". 

Among the recent visitors at Lasell was 
Gertrude Bull Lea. She reports a very full 
program at home, devoting much of her spare 
time to Y. W. C. A. work, and declared that 
she had received inspiration along many new 
lines during her visit here which she hoped 
to use later. 

Our preceptress confesses to finding this 
following item pinned on to her dresser re- 
cently. We think every "old girl" and new 
Avill instantly recognize its origin. It gives an 
account of a recent dog-fair in Boston and de- 
clares that three of the little doggies were 
provided with rubbers 1 . Cannot you "old 
girls" hear Miss Nutt laughing? 



We have recently come into possession of 
two beautiful poems written by our former 
schoolmate, Martha Haskell Clark '05. The 
poems appeared in the Christian Endeavor 
World and we venture to reprint them for 
the benefit of a large circle of Martha's 
friends. 



THE COUNTRY OF MAKE BELIEVE 

Do you know the Country of Make Believe, 

O sage of the whitened hair? 

Where its turrets lift from the clouds white drift. 

In the sweet of the spring time air, 

With many a knight on armor bright 

A-watch with his lady fair? 

It was yesterday that I lost the way 

And ever my heart will grieve 

For that mere little, queer little, 

Fear-little, dear little 

Country of Make-Believe. 

Do you know the Country of Make-Believe. 

Fair lady with rings of gold? 

For never a word have I wistful heard, 

On the lips of the graybeard told; 

But surely you can lead me true 

To the side of its gateway old. 

You do not know! I have wandered so! 

Must ever my strayed heart grieve 

For that fair little, rare little, 

Never-despair little 

Country of Make-Believe? 

My long lost Country of Make-Believe 

At the edge of the Twilight World, 

Where the smoke-sweet spires of its beacon-fires 

Are sleepily skyward curled; 

And the elf folk peer from each grass-hung spear 

And fronding of fern unfurled. 

Ah, little blue eyes, so round and wise, 

Ere ever my heart must grieve 

Fare back to your love little 

Known little, own little 

Country of Make-Believe! 

—Martha Haskell Clark. 



WHEN I AIN' GOT YOU 

Dere's a moth-wing a-flutterin' at de darkenin' 

winder-pane; 
Dere's a firefly a-twinklin' at de turnin' ob de lane; 
An' de roses say it's summer, but I can't belieb 

it's true, 
'Case it don't seem lak it's summer, when I ain't 

got you. 

Dere's a singin' summer chorus in de shader ob 

de bog; 
De bullfrog's in de ribber, an' de cooter's on de log; 
But when I tries to pick a tune frum out de ol' 

banjo, 
Ma fingers stop their strummin', an' the song won't 

seem to go, 

Wid summer on de medder, an' de world a-goin' 

right, 
Don' seem lak I got anythin' to grumble at to-night 
But de moonlight los' ks silber, an' de sky has los' 

its blue, 
An' everything jes nothin' — when I ain' got you. 

—Martha Haskell Clark. 



A CHRISTMAS PRAYER 

Today may the blessed spirit 
Of that Christmas so long ago 
Re-echo down the ages. 
In the hearts of the high and low; 

Today may the nations waken 
To a knowledge of wondrous love 
Which gave us the little Jesus 
Greatest gift of our God above. 

Today may that Christmas carol. 
Which the sheperds awoke to hear, 
Again bear its joyous message 
Of the end of all strife and fear; 

Today may the Christmas meaning 
Which began in the long ago 
Lay calm on our weary spirits, 
May it teach us to live and know: 

A wonderful world we live in, 
And a wonderful God above, — 
Be worthy of gifts by giving, 
And be worthy of life bv love. 



-Margaret Allen. 



86 



LASELL LEAVES 



CONNECTICUT VALLEY REUNION 

It was a perfect day and an ideal meeting 
place! A splendid company of fifty "old 
girls" and teachers gathered at the Hart- 
ford Country Club, October 31st. Our 
principal, Doctor Winslow, Mrs. Winslow 
and Miss Potter came all the way from head- 
quarters (Lasell) to join in our celebration 
and declared more than once that they felt 
many times repaid for the little journey which 
they had taken for our sakes. 

At luncheon the company were seated in 
friendly groups around small tables. Autum- 
nal tints appeared in the color scheme of the 
table decoration and Hallowe'en Jack o' 
lanterns were placed as favors for each guest. 
Someone whispered that Secretary Orra 
Hammond '12 had gathered from the nearby 
woods the lovely red berries which brightened 
the tables. One of the unique features of the 
Hallowe'en feast was the salad course which 
appeared in the shape of red apples, each rest- 
ing upon a ruddy autumn leaf, the tiny stem 
still attached serving as a natural handle for 
the cover of this very literal fruit dish filled 
with a delicious salad. 

Emily Bissell Swindells '99 proved a fine 
presiding officer and in her message paid a 
tender tribute to the late honorary president, 
Maria Warren Hayden '58. During the 
program which followed, Ruth. Talcott spoke 
interestingly of her war experience in Europe 
during the past summer, and Miss Potter 
told of the escape from the war zone of her- 
self and nine girls and of their voyage home 
in an immigrant boat. Jessie Hayden gave 
a delightful account of her visit in the West 
and meeting with loyal Lasell girls. From 
Mrs. Winslow we had a charming picture of 
the Lasell of today, which she wittily des- 
cribed as by no means "still life." Doctor 
Winslow answered many questions concern- 
ing Lasell and prophesied hopefully of her 
future, referred with appreciation to dear 
Miss Blaisdell, Miss Nutt, Miss Packard, and 



other members of the faculty, and also re- 
ferred to his recent hospitable entertain- 
ment by the Chicago Lasell Club. Doctor 
Bragdon's message came a little late but we 
venture to quote a few characteristic sen- 
tences. "Greetings to the Connecticut (how 
do you spell that?) Valley Lasell Club — one 
of the earliest and best sustained of all the 
Lasell Clubs! I well remember how I used 
to enjoy coming to your meetings and what 
a fine lot of Lasell 'girls' I used to meet! 
I wish I could be there next Saturday and 
greet you each one by the hand and look into 
those honest eyes again. * * I thank your 
secretary for remembering me with a card, 
for it would be easy — and I am looking for- 
ward to this with only loving feelings — to 
forget the old man, who is so far away from 
you all and from the activities of the school 
toward which, naturally, your interest turns. * 
When are you all coming to see us on the 
Golden Coast? You'd all be welcome! 
Have you all subscribed for The Leaves this 
year ? 

We give below the list of the girls who en- 
joyed this season's reunion of the Connecti- 
cut Valley Lasell Club: Emily Bissell Swin- 
dells '99, Clara McLean Rowley '02, Mary 
Goodwin Olmstead '03, Lucy Miller Robo- 
tham, Ruth Merriam, '98, Bessie Comstock, 
Laura Comstock, Susan Hallock Couch, Ruth 
Turner Gildersleeve, Gladys Goodman, Ruth 
Talcott, May Beardsley, Helen Radcliffe 
Stillman, Nellie M. Hart, Helen Day, Winni- 
fred Adams Hamilton, Lizzie Atwater Star- 
rett, Mabel Burwell Woodhouse, Elsie Bolles, 
'04, Orra Hammond '12, Marion Hale Bot- 
tomley '10, Sarah Dyer Darling, Etta Mc- 
Millan Rowe, Jessie W. Hayden, Florence 
Skinner, Helen Ferry, Alice Ballard, Grace 
Huntington, '89, Bess Robinson, Ruby Blais- 
dell Carter, Fannie MacKenzie, Winifred 
Whittlesey, '12, Olive Parker, Marjorie Wat- 
kins, Bessie Brainard, Bertha Libby Welles, 
Gertrude Reynolds, Emma White Welles, 
Grace Holmes Stiles, Mrs. Owens C. Wolfe, 
Evelyn Bates. 




Now the Christmas time is over and we are 
again back at Lasell to try to settle down to 
work. Christmas is always a season that 
is full of meaning to each of us. We 
hear, at that time, a great deal about the 
Christmas spirit, and we delight to show that 
spirit by small gifts, which express our love 
and appreciation of our friends. This is a 
praiseworthy custom, but isn't it the ideal 
way to carry this Christmas spirit all through 
the year and to make every day one of kindly 
deeds? Such deeds seem small and insig- 
nificant in themselves but they mean a great 
deal to other people. This year there is a 
gloom over all the world, both on account of 
the terrible conditions abroad, and the hard 
times at home. Let each one of us therefore 
in her own small way try to be kind, courte- 
ous and happy and see if we can't help to 
make a cheerful atmosphere wherever we are. 

As all of you know, Radcliffe has challenged 
Lasell to a basket ball game to be played very 
soon. Of course, Miss Warner will do all in 
her power to train the girls, so that we may 
have a fine team to represent us at Radcliffe ; 
but that is not all that is needed to make the 
plan a success. She should be given the loyal 
support of all in the school. 

When the call is sounded for us to come for 



practice, let us determine to respond readily 
although we can't possibly hope to "make the 
team." The six or seven lucky ones must 
have others to play against; so keep up the 
attendance. Since the games were so suc- 
cessful last fall let us continue the good work 
during the new year. 

If you don't play, come watch and cheer for 
the girls who are to represent us at Radcliffe 
and possibly at other schools if this game is a 
success. The girls who play need the en- 
couragement which "rooters" can give. 

Beside cheering let us see if we can't write 
some more basket ball songs, for the singing 
of the girls at the games is a splendid thing. 
Last year, Radcliffe congratulated the girls 
on the stirring songs and the fine spirit in 
which they were sung. Let us see if at this 
game we can't sing more songs and sing them 
just as well. 



This is only the second year for Lasell to 
play outside schools since fifteen years ago. 
Can't we make a grand success of the game 
so that next year we shall be able to have a 
large number of games? This is possible only 
if all the girls stick by Miss Warner and the 
team. Here is a chance to live up to our song, 
"We stand united." 



88 



LASELL LEAVES 



In handing to the Leaves staff her resigna- 
tion for the rest of her term, the editor wishes 
to express to everyone her deep appreciation 
of all that has been done in helping her to 
make the Lasell Leaves a paper which could be 
sent from our school as a representative of 
which we need not be ashamed, for that has 
been her constant aim. Every one of the girls 
in school during the time since last March is 
thanked most sincerely for the hearty support 
and willing co-operation which they have con- 
stantly shown in this one way of expressing 
loyalty to our school The times have been 
not a few when seemingly impossible demands 
have been made of the girls in a desperate 
effort to get material together in a last minute ; 
but the times have indeed been few when we 
have been disappointed after we made the 
demands; for this fact thanks again, are in 
order. It is not altogether a delightful task 
to give over the handling of a ship to some one 
else before port is reached; but the task is 
made easier by the fact that the one who as- 
sumes command now is thoroughly competent 
to finish the rest of the voyage. 

Girls show your loyalty to Lasell by sup- 
porting Doris Waller in her new and well 
deserved position as Editor-in-Chief of the 
Leaves staff. Thanks again! 



An inconstant elf, he knows not himself 
Nor his own changing mind an hour. 

He'll smile in your face, and with wry grimace 
He'll wither your youngest flower. 

Let the summer sun to his bright home run. 

He shall never be sought by me. 
When he's dimmed by a cloud I can laugh aloud 

And care not how sulky he be. 
For his darling child is the madness wild 

That sports in fierce fever's train. 
And when love is too strong it doesn't last long, 

As many have found to their pain. 

A mild harvest night by the tranquil light 

Of the modest and gentle moon 
Has a far sweeter sheen for me, I ween, 

Than the broad and unblushing noon. 
But every leaf awakens my grief 

As it lieth beneath the tree. 
So let autumn air be ever so fair, 

It by no means agrees with me. 

But my song I troll out for Christmas stout, 

The hearty, the true and the bold. 
A bumper 1 drain and with might and main 

Give three cheers for this Christmas old! 
We'll usher him in with a merry din 

That shall gladden his joyous heart. 
And we'll keep him up where there's bit or sup, 

And in fellowship good we'll part. 

In his fine honest pride he scorns to hide 

One jot of his hard weather scars. 
They're no disgrace, for there's much the same 
trace 

On the cheeks of our bravest tars. 
Then again I sing till the roof doth ring 

And it echoes from wall to wall — 
To the stout old wight fair welcome tonight 

As the king of the seasons all! 



A MOTHER 

Someone to teach and guard and guide, 
Someone who always understands; 
Someone to smooth away the cares 
With gentle voice and tender hands; 
Some one to comfort when you fail, 
Someone who's glad in your success, 
Someone who pours o'er you a love, 
The depth of which no one can guess; 
God's first gift to His dear Son, 
God's great gift to ev'ry one, 
A Mother. 

—Margaret Allen. 



A CHRISTMAS CAROL 

By Charles Dickens 

I care not for spring. On its fickle wing 
Let the blossoms and buds be borne. 

He woos them amain with his treacherous rain , 
And he scatters them ere the morn. 





So far this year Lasell Leaves has received 
ninety-two exchanges. All our friends of last 
year have not yet remembered us, but we 
hope to hear from them in the near future. 
We wish to extend a cordial welcome to the 
following new exchanges, and hope you will 
call regularly: 

The Academina, Evanston Academy, Evans- 
ton, 111., The Black and Gold, Winston-Salem 
City H. S., Winston-Salem, N. C, The Blue 
Bird, Julia Richman High School, New York 
City, The Dial, Brattleboro High School, 
Brattleboro, Vt., Drary Academy, Drury 
Academy, North Adams, Mass., The Forum, 
Lockport High School, Lockport, N. Y., The 
High School Review, Wichita Falls High 
School, Wichita Falls, Texas., The Hillilly, 
Asheville High School', Asheville, N. C, The 
Lion, Lyons Township High School, La Grange 
111., Medford High School Review, Medford 
High School, Medford, Mass., Messenger, 



Durham High School, Durham, N. C, The 
Miltonvale College Monitor, Miltonvale Wes- 
leyan College, Miltonvale, Kas., The Nautilus, 
Jacksonville High School, Jacksonville, 111., 
The Purple and Gray, Burlington High School 
Burlington, la., The Rambler, Frankfort High 
School, Burlington, la., TheSage, Greensboro 
High School, Greensboro, N. C, The Student, 
Rochester Catholic High School, Rochester, 
N. Y., Tatler, Elizabeth City High School, 
Elizabeth City, N. C, The Whirlwind, 
Ballinger High School, Ballinger, Tex., Wise- 
acres, School of Horticulture for Women, 
Ambler, Pa. 



The following October numbers arrived 
after our November number went to press: 

The Central ian, The Echoes, Garnet and 
Gray, The Herald, Knick Knacks, The Quill, 
The Tatler. 



90 



LASELL LEAVES 



Lasell Leaves gratefully acknowledges the 
receipt of the following November exchanges: 

The Advance, Aegis, The Archon, The 
Artisan, The B. H. S. Tatler, The Black and 
Red Review, Boton University Beacon, The 
Centralian, The Clarion, The Collines, The 
Columbian, The Commerce Caravel, The Daisy 
Chain, Dean Megaphone, The Elgin High 
School Mirror, The Folio, The Goldenrod, The 
Hermonite, The Imp, John Marshall Record, 
Keene Kronicle, Knick Knacks, The Lit, 
The Magpie, The Missile, The N. H. S. Re- 
view, The News, The Optimist ( Bloomington, 
Ind.) , The Optimist, (Newark, N. J., The 
Oracle, ( Montgomery, Ala.) , The Oracle,( Plain- 
field, N. J.) , The Orange, The Quarterly Tattler, 
The Quill, The Rambler, Reflector, The Roman, 
The Scroll, High School Review Somer- 
ville High School Radiator, The Student, The 
Tabula, University School News, Vail-Deane 
Budget, Wm. Woods College Record, The 
X-Ray. 

A few December exchanges have also been 
received : 

The Clarion, The Columbian, The Comet, 
The Golden-Rod, The Optimist (Bloomington, 
Ind.) , The Rambler, TheSasamore, The Student, 
The Tattler, The World. 



AS WE SEE OTHERS 

The Blue Bird — "A Theatrical Romance" 
is quite clever. We like your name very much, 
for "the blue bird stands for happiness," as 
your editor says in her greeting to the new- 
comers. 

Interesting stories, articles, and school 
notes, and a good quality of paper all help to 
make the Drury Academy one of our best 
exchanges. 

The Folio — It seems to us that your athletic 
department far outweighs the other depart- 
ments. Couldn't you have more stories, for 
instance? 

The Hillrilly — You certainly have an odd 
name. Your departments are well propor- 
tioned and quite complete. 



John Marshall Record — Your cover is neat 
and your magazine well-arranged. 

The November number of the Messenger 
contains an unusual number of good stories, 
and the cover design is artistic. 

The Nautilus — A valuable addition to our 
exchange table. Your jokes are unusually 
good, but may we suggest that you do not 
mix them in with the advertisements? 

The Rambler — Your cover design is unusual 
and very artistic. You have a fine magazine, 
very complete in all its departments. 

The Scroll — Your cover is very attractive, 
and your literary department splendid. The 
two prize stories in your November number 
are particularly well-written. 

The Student — Your literary department is 
excellent. 

The Quill — You have a very interesting 
paper, and your cuts are good. Don't you 
think a few jokes would improve it? 

The Dial — A few more cuts or photographs 
would add greatly to your paper. Your 
"School Notes" is a good department but 
your exchange department is very small. 

Les Collines — Some good cuts and pictures 
would help to make your paper even more 
attractive. 

Sage — Your paper is well arranged, and 
your joke department is good. 

Oracle — Your stories are interesting, but 
why not have a literary department? The 
arrangement of your paper would be improved 
by keeping the jokes in one place and the 
exchanges in another. 

Aegis — You have a very interesting paper. 

Beacon — The stories are pleasing. We would 
suggest some cuts. 

Shamokin High School Review — Your stories 
are good. A rearrangement of departments 
would improve your paper. Have you no 
school organizations? ' A few more cuts would 
make it more attractive. 

Continued on page 96 



Lrm) 




ft (^73 



FOR ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS 

"Once a Lasell girl, always a Lasell girl" 

All articles or "bits of gossip" for the Supplement should be sent to the Supplement editor, 

Lillian M. Packard. 




A CORNER OF LASELL CAMPUS 

PROFESSOR HILL'S MESSAGE 

Cordial greetings to my former pupils and 
friends ! 

One of the pleasant assurances in life is the 
thought that we, though absent, are not 
forgotten and when present were fully appre- 



ciated. We miss you all. It may have seemed to 
you that you were not appreciated in your 
endeavors to reach your high ideals but you 
were indeed. I have occasion to compare 
pupils of the past with the present, some- 
times favorably, sometimes unfavorably, and 
I want to give you a word of advice. Do not 
let the duties or pleasures of the times inter- _ 
fere with a little technical drill every day. 
Nature demands it. Your success demands it. 
Imagine you hear the bell marking the divi- 
sions at Lasell. Conform to the regulations 
and you will find time for everything and 
profit by it. 

I get greetings from some of my former 
"stars" occasionally. Not long since from 
Hattie Rutiedge, Marion Ordway, Louise 
McCarty, Charlotte Swartwout, Julia Ter- 
kuile and others. It is pleasant to hear from 
these of the past whom it has been both a 
pleasure and honor to teach and to remember 
with pride. 

Sincerely yours, 

Joseph A. Hills. 



LASELLS "HOME GATHERING" 

The New England Lasell Luncheon is to 
be held on the second Monday in February 
and through the courtesy and generosity of 
principal, Dr. Winslow, is served at Lasell. 
It is under the auspices of the Lasell Alumnae 
Association. Invitations are sent only to 



92 



LASELL LEAVES 



those within a limited radius of Boston for 
obvious reasons but Dr. Winslow and the 
Association invite and will cordially welcome 
any of the alumnae or former students who 
are visiting near by or who have come to 
live in New England and can make it pos- 
sible to be with us at this "Home Gathering." 
Please send your names to the President, 
Miss Packard, Lasell, or to the Secretary, 
Mrs. Maude Simes Harding, 28 Glenville 
Ave., Allston, Mass. A good time with some 
new features is promised. 

LASELL GIRLS AND THE PUBLIC 
PRESS 

The large majority of our girls are living 
more or less quiet lives in their homes, and 
home cities, heralded only in the public press 
when the wedding bells ring, or in the church 
or club notes. In spite of this, the editor of 
this department finds in an envelope devoted 
to "Notes for the Supplement" several 
clippings from the newspapers and weeklies 
which she believes will prove of interest, first 
because you know those of whom they speak ; 
second because the causes are worth while; 
third because their work does Lasell honor. 
From a Pasadena Daily: 

"Local Women has Royal Medal, given by 
Queen Margherita of Italy to show her interest 
in work. 1 ' 

"Possessed by Head of Montessori School." 

"Same reward that is given for deeds of Valor 
or Noteworthy Work." 

"The picture reproduced herewith shows the 
obverse and reverse of a medal recently pre- 
sented by Queen Margherita of Italy to Miss 
Mildred Johnston, Lasell, class of 1906, di- 
rector of the Montessori School, now perman- 
ently located as a feature of Hotel Maryland. 

"The medal was presented to Miss John- 
ston by the Queen Mother to show her 
appreciation and interest in the world-wide 
movement of which Miss Johnston is the 
harbinger in Pasadena. 

"The same medals are presented by the 
queen to her people in Italy who have per- 



formed some act of valor, or who have done 
something worthy of note, and were given first 
to those upon whom she wished to confer some 
title. 




"Both Miss Johnston and her assistant, 
Miss Gladys Burrows, have been the recip- 
ients of these highly prized decorations, and 
they are the only two persons in Southern 
California who were graduates of the Second 
International Montessori Training School to 
receive them. 

Queen Margherita has always taken a 
great interest in the Montessori School in 
Rome, and these medals are a token of her 
appreciation for the notable work which the 
graduates are accomplishing. 

"The obverse of the medal carries a repre- 
sentation of the Queen Mother, and the re- 
verse an inscription in Italian, reading, 



LASELL LEAVES 



93 



Presented by the Queen Mother, Rome, 1914.'^/ 

From a Concord, N. H. Daily: 

"Daughters of the Revolution." 

"In an interesting article reporting the 
Thirteenth Annual Conference in this city 
we cull two or three paragraphs of interest to 
us. 'The response to the welcome of the visi- 
tors to the city was responded to in her most 
charming way by State Vice-Regent, Miss 
Annie T. Wallace (Lasell, class of '83) of 
Rochester * * * .' At a business session, 
Miss Annie Wallace was elected state regent." 
Our congratulations. 

From a popular weekly: 

11 Worth While Folk; A Housekeeping 
Scientist." — By Birch Arnold. 

"It is not every unprofessional woman who 
can plan the construction of a unique colonial 
house of thirteen rooms and carry out her 
own ideas despite the objections of pro- 
fessional architects who declared the design 
impracticable. Such was the initial effort 
in business efficiency of Mrs. Edith W. Dunk 
of Detroit, president of the Detroit House- 
wives' League for the second term. 

There were some features that Mrs. Dunk 
desired in her home which the architects de- 
clared impossible of construction. Chief of 
these was a fireplace in the living room, in 
the sun parlor, and the den in the basement, 
with only one chimney for the three. Other 
features were a long row of windows between 
hall and dining room, a kitchen in front, no 
back door, and sunny exposure in all rooms. 
Today the house stands, with its several 
specified features, a veritable receptacle of all 
the sunshine the day vouchsafes. 

"I did not want my house to be the usual 
woman killer, as are so many of the large 
houses of today," said Mrs. Dunk in com- 
menting upon the peculiar arrangement of 
the rooms. "I had the kitchen placed in 
front, so that the maid could readily answer 
the telephone and adjust the switchboard to 
the phones in all the other rooms. The 
butler's pantry, over which I spent many an 
anxious moment, has a comoartment for 



every utensil used in cooking. Each in its 
own place saves time — and saving time is 
one of my hobbies." 




EDITH WATK1NS DUNK 

"From the kitchen a short spiral stairway 
leads to the maid's room above; another to 
the side entrance and thence to the den be- 
low, where the maid entertains her friends. 

"In the basement there is an immense 
vacuum cleaner operated by electricity. Every 
room has its plug in the baseboard, and in 
the hall is the closet holding the cleaner for 
each story. The entire house can be cleaned 
in short order and with very little labor. 
'Indeed," said Mrs. Dunk, 'I am often amused 
to see my husband run the cleaner over his 
desk in search of stray specks of dust before 
he seats himself at his work. It was my aim, 
in this day of the domestic servant question, 
so to minimize work that one or two servants 
at most would be all I should need. 

"Another thing, I desired a place to keep 
my belongings that would not necessitate 



94 



LASELL LEAVES 



taking down half a dozen dresses to find the 
one I wanted. So instead of closets I had 
these wardrobes built into the wall. In this 
compartment I keep my suits; in this my 
house gowns; in this my evening gowns; in 
this my cloaks; in this my gloves; in this my 
hats. Everything is placed so that I can put 
my hand on it in the dark, if necessary. 

"My sun parlor, with its much discussed 
fireplace, and its tiled floor which only needs 
the hose turned on it to keep it clean, I 
meant to have as sunshiny as possible. In- 
stead of the usual dull double shades, I 
ordered glazed chintz in American Beauty 
roses. Now look!" 

"It was a cloudy winter day. A big log was 
burning in the wide fireplace, and the flames 
flickered gleefully round the walls; but as 
the hostess of the charming home half drew 
the shades, behold the land of snow was 
forgotten, for on three sides of the large room 
bloomed a tangle of crimson roses! 

Old colonial furniture — four-poster cano- 
pied bedsteads one hundred and twenty-five 
years old and a grandfather's clock that 
antedates them by fifty years, match the 
colonial designs of the house. Charming as 
it is in construction and arrangement, it is 
doubly charming in the spirit of hospitality 
and camaraderie that breathes in every 
corner. 

Mrs. Dunk is Detroit born, a graduate of 
Wells College; but it was at Lasell Seminary 
in Boston, that old school of the home arts, 
which graduated its first class in 1854 and 
is today teaching its students by practical 
example how to make and keep a home, that 
the first direction was given to the home-making 
faculty. 

"But it is not alone as a home builder that 
Mrs. Dunk has shown her greatest efficiency. 
As the first and only president of the Detroit 
Housewives' League, she proved herself a 
forceful and capable leader. For a period of 
eight months two thousand five hundred 
women looked to her for guidance in the 
fight against the high cost of living. The milk 



question, the market question, the question 
of the sanitation of shops and groceries, she 
attacked with the same fearlessness that she 
displayed in the construction of her home. 
Possessed of unusual personal magnetism 
and, what is even more potent in its influence 
upon mankind, a democracy of good feeling, 
she rallied an enthusiastic band of women 
about her to forward the work of the league. 

"Her attack on the Milk Trust led to a sum- 
mons before a grand jury. She not only 
met the combined forces with a resourceful- 
ness that proved her mastery of the situation 
but achieved the signal victory of bringing 
lowered prices a month earlier than had been 
the custom of the milk dealers. 

"Mrs. Dunk has been made a deputy 
food inspector, the only woman in Michi- 
gan, if not in the United States, to be accorded 
the honor. She is also chairman of the 
home economics department of the City 
Federation of Clubs, secretary of the animal 
welfare committee of the Twentieth Century 
Club, the largest and most progressive club 
in the city, and president and state chair- 
man of the Housewives' League. 

Mrs. Dunk was Edith Watkins, at Lasell in 
'94-95, and was back for a visit with her hus- 
band in the summer of 1913. She is now vice- 
president of the Michigan Lasell Club. 



In one of the December numbers of the 
Zions Herald is an article headed Noteworthy 
Seed Sowing. We discover that the sower in 
this instance is none other than Elizabeth 
Merriam who is much interested in the free 
distribution of part of the Bible and has a 
definite plan for the carrying out of her idea. 
"In addition she distributes copies of St. 
Luke's gospel, printed in Spanish, Italian, 
French, German, Swedish and Portuguese." 
The editor adds "Her service is one highly to| 
be recommended." 

The Sunday School Message for December| 
in reporting "The Silver Jubilee" of the Mass. 
S. S. Association prints an interesting annual! 
report from one of its secretaries, Bessie Roper 



LASELL LEAVES 



95 



Conant (here in 1892-5) which shows the 
splendid work she has been doing. We quote 
one good paragraph. 

"Yet with all the encouraging features there 
is the need for the better understanding of the 
needs and possibilities which lie concealed 
in the lives of our young people. First should 
come the putting of ourselves into closer 
touch with them and an honest attempt to 
look at the Sunday School, the church, at 
life from their standpoint. Books will help 
us, but living with real young people is best 
of all. Let us catch their optimism and for- 
get to say 'It can't be done.' * * * ' 



The following letter was crowded out of 
the October Supplement but is too interesting 
to be missed. Annie Crowe is the writer. 

Isle Acadia, 

Kenora, Ontario. 

July 12, 1914. 

True to my word, I am writing to tell you 
of Edith Houghton's wedding. I had two 
happy weeks with her before the event and 
Katherine Wheeler and her sister were there 
too. We four girls had such fun together and 
it seemed almost like being at Lasell again. It 
was a quiet home wedding and we girls tried 
to make it as bright as possible. We had 
many laughs and jests from the tops of step- 
ladders when we were decorating and the 
house looked quite festive for the occasion. 
Edith herself never looked sweeter and her 
bridal attire of white was most becoming. 
Katherine sang, "Beloved, It is Morn" be- 
fore the ceremony and I presided at the piano. 
We had quite a unique experience — that of 
travelling with the bride and groom for the 
first few hours of their journey. We left them 
at Omaha and they went on to Denver and 
from their post cards, I judge they have had 
a delightful holiday. 

One day we went to Clarinda to see Ruth 
Kimball Matthews who graduated in '98 
Mary Houghton Will 1900 was with us too, 
which made five Lasell girls in the party. We 
were sorry that Luella Houghton Pringle '98 



couldn't come with us. We had a great 
deal of fun settling the bride's cottage and it 
was quite ready for the bride and groom when 
they returned. 

I only remained a day in St. Paul as I was 
too anxious to get home. I was away nearly 
three months, and it was so nice to be able to 
settle down to a permanent abode again. 

I am sincerely, 

Annie M. Crowe. 

P. S. I had a letter from Christine Ryrie, 
whom I missed seeing in Toronto, and she 
says they are looking forward to moving 
into their new home in the fall and also to 
another extended European trip next winter. 
They are installing an organ in their new home. 



FOR OUR CLUB MEMBERS 

For the amusement if not the inspiration 
of many of our "Club Members" we reprint 
the following "Essay" from Life. Insert 
"Health," "Child Labor," "Suffrage" or 
any other subject in your line and you will be 
ready for the next meeting of the club. 

AN ESSAY ON— 
Convenient Form for the Use of Woman s Club 

Members Who May Find It Necessary to 

Prepare Papers on Short Notice. 

There is a great deal of discussion in the 
newspapers and magazines these days upon 
the subject of - — . Much of this dis- 

cussion is quite sensible and rational, but 
much of it, I regret to say, is futile and incon- 
sequential. One reason for that, of course, is 
that - - is extremely difficult to define. 

In discussing any subject one should always 
be sure of one's definitions. 

For the purposes of the present paper, how- 
ever, a formal definition will not be necessary. 
for wherever the word - - is used herein, 

its usual meaning will be intended. In order 
to make the subject perfectly clear, we may 
divide • into two kinds or classes: 

good and bad • . These 

should always be kept carefully distin- 
guished in one's mind. Whenever good - 



96 



LASELL LEAVES 



is found there is every reason to believe that 

its influence will be beneficial, while bad 

on the other hand, is uniformly vicious and 
unworthy of the support of self-respecting 
men and women. 

As yet there are no reliable statistics as to 

the extent of in the United States, 

and, therefore, it is impossible to tell whether 
it is increasing or diminishing. This is un- 
fortunate, but it is easy to understand, be- 
cause it is only in the last year or two that the 

real importance of is coming to be 

realized. Accordingly, we have every reason 
to hope that full reports, not only as to 
quantity, but as to quality also, will soon be 
available. 

In conclusion, I am glad to see women tak- 
ing a wider interest in this department of 
human thought. I am sure that a careful 
study of — - will repay all of you and 

any other women who desire to extend their 
sphere of influence. 



and we are anxious already to see what will 
follow. — The Columbian. 



The Department of Personals should al- 
ways be read in connection with The Sup- 
plement. 



AS OTHERS SEE US 

Continued from page 90 

Lasell Leaves — You are numbered among our 
best exchanges. All of the departments are 
well-worked up. Your cuts are fine. This is 
our first copy, but we sincerely hope it will 
not be our last — Reflector. 

Lasell Leaves is certainly to be congratulated 
on its large literary department. Evidently 
the pupils of Lasell Seminary do not have to 
be "begged" to write stories for their paper. 
■ — The Scroll. 

Lasell Leaves — A new exchange that we take 
great pleasure in adding to our exchange 
column. Each department of this paper is 
carefully edited and nicely arranged. — The 
Folio. 

Lasell Leaves is the only magazine on our 
exchange list that has a continued story. 
"Kathryn" has a very interesting beginning 



A CHRISTMAS ACROSTIC 

(CHRISTMAS hath a darkness 
^ Brighter than the blazing noon; 
Christmas hath a chilliness 
Warmer than the heart of June; 
Christmas hath a beauty 
Lovelier than the world can show. 

■ — Christina Rossetti 

TJEAP on more wood! The wind is chill. 
But, let it whistle as it will. 
We'll keep our Christmas merry still. 

— Walter Scott 

"D ING out, ye crystal spheres! 
Once bless our human ears, 
If ye have power to touch our senses so, 
And let your silver chime move in melodious time, 

And let the bass of heaven's deep organ blow. 
And with your ninefold harmony make up full 

consort 
To the angelic symphony. 

■ — John Milton 

TT is the Christmas time, 

And up and down 'twixt heaven and earth 
In glorious grief and solemn mirth 
The shining angels climb. 

— D. M. Mulock Craik 

CJHEPHERDS at the grange, 
Where the Babe was born, 
Sang with many a change 
Christmas carols until morn. 

— Henry W. Longfellow 

* I , HE star which they saw in the east 
Went before them till it came and 
Stood over where the young Child was. 

— Matthew 

MERRY CHRISTMAS, hear them say 
As the east is growing lighter. 
May the joy of Christmas day 

Make your whole year gladder, brighter. 

— Margaret Deland 

A GAIN at Christmas did we weave 
■^ The holly round the Christmas hearth. 

— Alfred Tennyson 

C ING the song of great joy that the angels 
^ began, 

Sing of glory to God and of good will to man. 

— John G. Whittier 




LASELL LEAVES 



97 



LASELL STUDENTS 

Will Make No Mistakes 
In Depending Upon 

New England's 
Greatest Store 



FOR THEIR VARIOUS NEEDS 

Here one may choose from 

unequaled assortments of 

Clothing Furnishing Rugs Pictures 

Artwares Trunks and Luggage 

and the many other things so frequently 
needed during college days 



Best of all, selection here is never from 
commonplace stock but from the best that 
Europe and America can produce 



Jordan Marsh Company 



BOSTON 



EVENING DRESSES 
AFTERNOON DRESSES 

Youthful Supplies for Misses 




Prices $16.50 to $125.00 

Cfjanbler & Company 

151 Fremont Street, Poston 



98 



LASELL LEAVES 



C. F. Hovey Company 

Summer, Chauncy and Avon Streets 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Bach-lor-Girl Stockings 

These trade-marked stockings are made of the 
most durable imported yarns, and we believe 
them to be the best wearing stockings pro- 
duced at this weight. We guarantee each pair. 

Manufactured for and Sold Exclusively by 

C. F. HOVEY COMPANY 

No. 29L— "Bach-lor-Girl" Guaranteed Stock- 
ings; gauze weight, silk lisle with extra spliced 
heel and toe; in black, tan and white. 



Box 
of 



3 pairs 
lor 



$1.00 



No. 29 — "Bach-lor-Girl" Guaranteed Stock- 
ings; light weight cotton with extra spliced heel 
and toe; black only. 



Box 
of 



3 pairs 
tor 



$1.00 




The Plastic Shoe 



(Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 




In Low or High Cut 
and also in Pumps 



The Plastic Shoe 
is the result of 30 
years of study in 
the search for a 
shoe that will help 
all foot troubles and 
still retain a grace- 
ful appearance. 

The Plastic Shoe 
assists one to walk 
as nature intended. 
It removes the 
strain and ache 
resulting from walk- 
ing or standing in 
ill fitting shoes. 



Thayer, McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



When You Visit Lasell Stop at 

NYE PARK INN 

46 GROVE STREET 
Between the Seminary and Station 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

FIRE PROOF GARAGE 



LASELL LEAVES 



99 



CHINA AND GLASS 

The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in this line 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glass 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits every season by our buyers to the 
best makers in Great Britain, France, Germany, Austria and Amer- 
ica. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS Gallery 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

FRANKLIN, COR. HAWLEY ST., BOSTON 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 

Compliments of 

GEO. J. BARKER LUMBER CO. 



WALTHAM, MASS. 

George C. Folsom 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 

W. F. HADLOCK 
Newsdealer and Stationer 

Developing and Printing 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



CAPODANNO & ALBANO 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco. 

331 AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Tel. Con. 



C. A. DONOVAN 

345 AUBURN STREET AUBURNDALE 

Ladies' and Men's Furnishings 
Dry Goods and Small Wares 



ELLIOTT W. KEYES 
PHARMACIST 
Drugs- Medicines-Chemicals-Choice Confections 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 



HAYDEN 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 

College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 



COTTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

jj MAKERS OF 

CAPS and GOWNS' 

j 

to the American'Universities and 
Colleges, to Lasell Seminary and 
scores of other Academies. 

CLASS CONTRACTS A 
SPECIALTY. 

PULPIT and CHOIR GOWNS. 



Dewton Tee Company 

MILLER BROS. 




Post Office 
Address: 



Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 



PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Receipts 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 PORTLAND STREET, BOSTON 
Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for Price List of over 60 kinds 



CARDS AND CilFTS 

Tlie ^e^vv Slxoj3 

149 TREMONT ST., ROOM 923, BOSTON, MASS. 

Waists and Dresses Made at Low Prices 
WAISTS $3.50 DRESSES $8.00 & $10.00 




C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 
Mu&it dealers 

Announce their Removal to 

2B Park Street, Boston. Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Three doors above their old store. Send for our recent 
catalogues. Mail orders filled the same day as received. 
Music sent on selection if desired. 



100 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



SCHOOL 
STATIONERY 



Note Books 

Students' Paper 
Fountain Pens, etc. 



Engraved and Printed 



Programs 



Invitations 



Dance Orders 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON 7 SQUARE 



BOSTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 686 Hay market 



SPORT COATS 
"""~ MACKINAW^ 
SERGE MIDDY SUITS 



SPECIALTIES 

FOR 

COLLEGE GIRLS 



Send for Illustrated Booklet 

Henry S. Lombard 

22 to 26 Merchants Row 
BOSTON, MASS. 




Ladies are delighted 

with the results of using Camp- 
bell's Stain on Floors, Furni- 
ture and Woodwork. 

Gives superb finish, brings out 
the natural grain of the wood. 
Write for color card 

Carpenter-Morton Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Established 1882 



Incorporated 1904 



GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costfumers 

6 Boylston Place, Boston, Mass. 

College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Oxford 145 



Jllaugusi 
^Printing 
Company 

iWassacf)Ufiiett0| 



Telephone* Haynurkei 2311-2312 



Flowers 
of Quality 



HOUGHTON -GORNEY CO. 

:-: Florists :-: 



119 TREMONT STREET, 

[Park Street Church] 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Specialty 

Flower Shop of Boston 



FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED TO ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Free Delivery to Lasell 




SSK 



/-* • »» ,,, !U *- 

-• i J«i •• w 



_. i »m i k. 



■* f • 



HT 



[cW 






Vol. xxxx 



No. 4 



JANUARY, 1915 



_ . 



TWO STUDIOS 



164 








TREMONT 




STREET 




Telephone Ox- 




ford 2687 








?j^f*5g 






f 


m 


ft 






w 






Bait photo^ 



RT in relation to PORTRAIT 
PHOTOGRAPHY is the 
realization of beauty, grace and 

intelligence, as expressed in the finished 

portrait. 

Our advanced 1915 styles we honestly believe 

will appeal to you. Special discount rates to 

all Lasell Students. 



161 

TREMONT 

STREET 

Telephone 

Oxford 858 




Our Stock Never Gets Old 



NEW GOODS ARRIVE EVERY DAY 



AjSUMMERSI 

WHOLESALE 
V RETAIL 



Diamonds 
Watches 
Silver Goods 
Combs 
Cut Glass 
Coral Jewelry 
Roman F earls 
Ebony Goods 



Vanity Cases 
Photo Frames 
Leather Goods 
Fountain Pens 
Brass Goods 
Chafing Dishes 
Percolators 
Parisian Ivory 



CHARGE 

ACCOUNTS 

OPENED 



Our Watch and Jewelry Repair Departments do 
the best work at very low prices 

MR. F. F. DAVIDSON 
AUBURNDALE 




LASELL LEAVES 



101 



A. SHUMAN & CO 



The Service Store, Boston 



Tailored Apparel for 
College Girls of 
Rare Distinction 



Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabrics — 

Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 

Splendid Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



=5 

Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

13 ^ Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



We Can Please You 

Come and See for Yourself 

Dry Goods, Small Wares, Dress Goods, Silks, 
Velvets, Linings, Laces, Gloves, Ribbons, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Hosiery, Underwear, Millinery,Cloth- 
ing, Hats, Caps, Shoes, and Garments ot every 
description. 



P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-135-137-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 



THE ONE GREAT TREASURE 

FOR EVERY STUDENT 

The Family Music Book 



800 PAGES 
CLOTH 




252 PIECES 
BOUND 



Contains $50 worth of music — vocal 
and instrumental. 

(Transit to Lasell 10 cents extra) 

Circular with complete information sent 
upon request. 

THE BOSTON MUSIC CO. 

26 and 28 West Street Boston, Mass. 

PUBLISHERS THE g M Q EDITIQ 



102 



LASELL LEAVES 



Nearly a Century in 

CARPETS and RUGS 

Few concerns in this country have so long a business 
record and none in Floor Coverings. 

A large, well selected stock, shown by experienced 
salesmen and the same methods that won the respect and 
patronage of parents and grandparents we believe will 
prevail with the present generation. 

Quality considered, it is our purpose not to be under- 
sold by any of our competitors. 

Everything in Floor Coverings 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

646-650 Washington St. Opposite Boylston St. 



Meyer Jonasson & Co 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Waists, Furs and Sweaters 



GARMENTS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 
A SPECIAL FEATURE 




Correct Overgaiter Effects 



This model comes in 
Patent Leather o r 
Gun Metal, Spanish 
heels, and Cloth or 
Leather Tops in Gray, 
Black and Fawn. 

PRICES $6 TO $12 

10% cash discount to 
students and faculty of 
Lasell. 



160 Tremont Street, Boston 




{taEli L&AVE5 



DUX FEMINA FACTI" 



Vol. XXXX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., JANUARY, 1915 No. 4 

Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 
FLORENCE EVANS 



CAROL RICE 



Local Editor 
HELEN BENSON 



Assistant Local Editor ROSE BAER 



LIST OF OFFICERS 

Editor-in-chief 
DORIS WALLER 

Associate Editor 

Art Editor 
EDITH HODGES 



Assistant Art Editor, CHARLOTTE WHITING 

Personal Editor 
CATHARINE CARTER 



Subscription Editor 
FRANCES HARRIS 



Exchange Editor 
MAUDE HAYDEN 

Assistant Exchange Editor 
ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 

Staff Photogiapher BESS EMEE IrxE 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (Including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 









John Kendrick Bangs (frontispiece) 

Literarv . . . . 

Locals . _ _ _ . . 


CONTENTS 

104 Personal 

105 Editorial 

. 115 Exchanges _ - 


119 

121 

122 





ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar . Inside front cover 

Thomas Long I nside front cover 

A. Shuman & Co. .. 101 

Pinkham & Smith .. 101 

P. P. Adams ._ 101 

Schirmer ... 101 

T. E. Moseley Co. _ __ 102 

Meyer Jonasson & Co. ... 102 

JonnH. Pray & Sons Co. ... 102 

Chandler & Co. ..125 

Jordan Marsh Co. .125 

Thayer, McNeil Co. ..126 

C. F. Hovey & Co. . . 126 

English Tea Room . . . 126 

Nye Park Inn 126 

A. T. Bridges ... 127 

The New Shop ..127 



C.W.Thompson 127 

Cottrell & Leonard 127 

W. F. Hadlock 127 

Capodanno & Albano 127 

C. A. Donovan 127 

Elliott W. Keyes . 127 

Hayden . .127 

Newton Ice Co . 127 

Geo. f. Barker Lumber Co. 127 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton 127 

George C. Folsom 127 

Damon . 128 

H. S. Lombard . .--128 

Carpenter Morton . 128 

George P. Raymond 128 

Maugus Printing Co. 128 

Houghton-Gorney Co. Inside back cover 




JOHN KENDRICK BANGS 
Honorary Member of the Class of 1916 




A TRUE HEROINE 

FIRST PRIZE STORY 
IN LEAVES CONTEST 

On a certain gloomy October day Marie 
Neufelder sat "by the window, knitting socks 
and looking out upon the dreaded scene of 
battle. She was alone. Her mother had 
gone to the church, now a temporary hospital, 
where her father with many others lay 
wounded ; the English servants had long since 
fled in terror to their home country- From 
the window where she sat, Marie could look 
out a quarter of a mile across the fields to 
where the German forces were stationed, 
bombarding the Liege forts. She could not 
see them plainly, but could distinguish the 
men on horseback and could see when some 
fell from the ranks, disabled by the return 
fire. Her heart beat heavily with the horror 
of it all and the ever passionate desire to do 
something. She was a strong robust girl of 
about fifteen, with a slightly boyish manner 
and a loyal Belgian heart, and she was not 
sitting here alone, knitting socks from choice. 
Her mother had forbidden her goinp- to the 
hospital because the scenes of suffering were 
so terrible and she had decided that it would 
be best for Marie to help by making socks 
which would be much needed in the army as 
winter was fast approaching. Of course I he 
scene of battle was no less terrible, but that 
could not be helped, and it was not near 



enough for one to see the actual suffering. 

"Oh dear," sighed Marie heavily, dropping 
the knitting to her lap, "why can't I do some- 
thing besides this old knitting? Why couldn't 
1 have been a boy?" she continued to muse. 
"Charles and Albert are at Antwerp doing 
something worth while ; and Mother is at the 
hospital nursing Father and the others — 
some of them Germans. It's all right for a 
woman to bring comfort to the wounded, but 
it's not half so noble as to risk being wound- 
ed for your country. I wonder if Albert and 
Charles are still safe." 

At that moment several heavy guns thun- 
dered forth their volley. The whole house 
shook, but Marie was not startled for she had 
become accustomed to it. She recognized it 
as the guns from the fort, and glanced out of 
the window. Clouds of smoke hid the Ger- 
mans from sight for several minutes, then as 
they gradually lifted Marie noted that there 
was quite a vacancy toward the center of the 
troops. Her heart beat wildly. "That's the 
best shot they've made yet. Before they have 
been almost bring wild. < )h, I wish they 
would keep it up and wipe out all the enemy 
quick. I wish I could just tell them how good 
that was." 

But what could she do shut up there in the 
house and a girl. As she picked up her knit- 
ting and "lanced across the room at the clock 
her eye caught sight of the telephone. In a 
Hash came the thought, ' 1 can telephone to 



106 



LASELL LEAVES 



the fort," but in another instant she remem- 
bered that it had been reported early in the 
morning that all the wires had been cut by 
the Germans during the night. 

"Can't even use a telephone," she ejacu- 
lated. "I wonder if they did cut every single 
wire. How did they know when they got them 
all ?" 

She glanced out of another window 
facing the street, "Why those wires are up ! 
And that man stood right underneath them 
and told my mother that! Oh well, I suppose, 
though," she mused, "they could cut the main 
ones near central and that would mean cutting 
connections everywhere. I'm tired of this 
knitting and I'm awfully lonesome, and oh 
dear, I wonder how long this awful war will 
have to last. I believe I'll try that phone and 
see what happens." 

Throwing aside her knitting, and going 
over to the phone, she took up the reeciver. 
She waited a minute. No answer came, and 
there was not the usual buzz. "Guess he told 
the truth," she thought Then she moved the 
hook up and down at intervals for several 
minutes. Suddenly there was a sharp click 
and a sharp, unexpectant "Hello." "Hello, is 
it central?" said Marie in a voice shaking 
with surprise. "Why, yes," stammered the 
voice, equally surprised at hearing an an- 
swer. 

"Oh good ! Then the wires aren't all down, 
are they?" 

"You are the first one to call today. We 
thought they were all cut but have been try- 
ing to find out. They evidently overlooked 
yours." 

"I'm glad they did. Please give me the 
Liege forts quick." 

"I'll try and make the connections but it 
may be half an hour or more. I'll call you." 

Marie then spent nearly an hour of im- 
patient waiting, knitting, walking up and 
down, the room, or gazing from the window 
by turns. Another discharge had come from 
the big guns at the fort and although not so 



successful as the last had felled a number of 
the enemies' men. The Germans were now 
moving eastward. Marie became still more 
uneasy. If only they would hurry she could 
tell them how to fire next. It was some fif- 
teen minutes more before the bell rang and 
she rushed to the phone. 

"We have the connection. All ready." 

"Hello," called Marie. "Is it Liege forts?" 

"Yes," came a quick deep voice. "What 
is it?" 

"Those last two discharges were splendid," 
burst forth the girl, "They broke up the Ger- 
mans pretty well. The others haven't been 
very good. I wanted — " 

"Hold on! Who are you? and where?" 

"I'm Captain Neufelder's daughter and 
from our house I can see the German move- 
ments. They've moved east about an eighth 
of a mile since you fired last." 

"Sure you are right?" 

"Yes. Please believe me. I want to help 
so much." 

"All right. Good-bye." 

Turning from the phone Marie crossed 
over to the window, gathered up her knitting, 
and worked desperately for a while. As an- 
other discharge shook the house, she looked 
out. They had taken her suggestion and fired 
a little eastward, and many more were dropped 
from the ranks. They were moving back. 
She would call the fort and tell them. 

"Hello. Is it the fort?" 

"Yes," came the same deep voice. "How 
was it that time?" 

"Splendid," replied Marie. "They are mov- 
ing back to the first position." 

"Thank you for your interest, my girl, but 
you must not call again. You will be in dan- 
ger of arrest." 

"I would be willing to risk that," returned 
Marie enthusiastically but seriously. "I have 
been longing to do something to help my 
country." 

"That's a good spirit, but you had better 
not call the forts as;ain." 



LASELL LEAVES 



107 



The phone clicked at the other end. Marie 
resumed her seat by the window fully deter- 
mined to call the forts again if it was a help 
and it seemed to he so far. And so it was that 
not only again but many times, that day and 
for several days, the Belgian guns were di- 
rected over a phone which the Germans had 
neglected to destroy, by a girl. 

On the third day while Marie eagerly sent 
messages to the forts, several German soldiers 
were riding about the town, stopping now and 
then to hold up a pedestrian or raid a house, 
and trying, if they might, to discover the Bel- 
gian methods which had proved so successful. 
In their first purpose they succeeded rather 
well, but not so in the last. Once dur- 
ing the morning as they rode up a certain 
street scanning each house, one of the men 
noticed, sitting by a window and working bus- 
ily with her needles, a young girl. For a mo- 
ment she stopped working and watched their 
approach, then began again working even 
faster. 

"She must be made of different stuff 

from the rest," thought one of the men. 

To his companion he remarked, "Notice that 
girl? First one I've seen that didn't run and 

hide at sight of us". 

"That's so," replied the other glancing up. 

Later, the same day, these two men had oc- 
casion for passing that way again. They both- 
looked up at the window. The girl was there, 
this time not knitting, but standing, eagerly 
gazing across the fields, unconscious of being 
watched. Both turned to see what held her 
attention. A cloud of smoke was rising from 
the battle held. They turned again to the 
window. The girl was just disappearing. 
Both men became interested, not because of 
suspicion on their part, but because the girl 
had struck them as being unusual. Between 
them they decided to come back that way a 
little later. The girl was there as before. A 
heavy report resounded. As before, after 
the smoke cleared, she turned and disap- 
peared. The men faced each other. "Can it 



be," said the young man, "that she is send- 
ing messages." 

"It looks like it, but how?" inquired the 
older man. 

"I don't know. Let's think." 

They crossed the road, where they could 
better command a view of the window with- 
out being seen, and dismounted. They then 
proceeded to debate several possible methods 
of signals but none seemed quite satisfying. 

"Could it be — . No they're all out of com- 
mission," thought the young man half aloud. 

"What is it?" interrupted the other. 

"Telephones." 

"Telephones! But we cut all the wires." 

"That's what I said." 

"Wait a minute. We might have missed 
one. We'll find out." Then he related a plan 
to the other. 

They waited until the next thundering dis- 
charge belched forth, then the man whose plan 
it was, crossed over to a telegraph pole, 
climbed it, and attached to the wire connected 
with the house, an instrument which he car- 
ried for the purpose of sending messages. 
The other watched the window. In a few 
minutes he called, "She's gone." 

The man on the pole opened his instrument 
to hear the following message : 

"Hello, Liege." 

"Hello. Not so good this time. It looks 
as though reinforcements had just arrived. 
Aim a little more southwest." 

Climbing quickly down from the pole he 
returned to his companion. "We've found 
our trouble, the reason for the Belgian's suc- 
cess." Then he repeated the message. "We 
shall have to make an arrest," he said gravel)". 
"This can not go on." 

"I'm afraid we shall, but I hate to," quietly 
said the other. 

They crossed the street and entered the 
house. At first Marie was startled for it was 
Hie first time a German had entered their 
home although they had raided several nearby 
dwellings. "What do you want?" she de- 



108 



LASELL LEAVES 



manded as sternly as she could. 

"You, my lady," replied the older man. 

".Me? What for?" 

"You are under arrest for communicating 
with the Liege forts. You have violated the 
articles of warfare by giving aid to the 
enemy." 

"Oh," was all she said. She had been 
warned. She had nothing to say but quietly 
gave herself up. 

"Llave you anything to say in defense?" 
asked the man. "You know this means court- 
martial and death." 

"No," she returned bravely. 

The younger man turned to her in admira- 
tion and pity. "You might plead not guilty," 
he suggested. 

"Plead not guilty? Never!" she flashed, 
drawing herself up in indignation. "I have 
served my country three days; Do you think 
I am afraid to die for it now ?" 

And certainly she was not afraid, for she 
never flinched when not many days later, at 
sunrise, she was led, blindfolded and with 
hands bound behind her, to face a firing squad. 
Heroically as ever any man, she gave up her 
life as a penalty for service to her country. 

Helen Pope. 

It is interesting to know that Helen Pope, 
the winner of the first prize in the Leaves 
contest, based her story on the following clip- 
ping from the Boston Herald : 

THE GIRL WHO DIRECTED THE 
LIEGE GUNS 

A local physician was caught in the act of 
sending carrier pigeons to Liege with advice 
for the better handling of the Belgian guns. 
The Germans shot him in the house among- his 
pigeons. Nevertheless, the Belgian fire con- 
tinued to be marvellously fatal. 

Then another discovery was made. A 
young girl, the daughter of a well-to-do citi- 
zen, was using a telephone that, through some 
oversight, the Germans had failed to destroy. 
From the window of her father's house she 



watched the effects of the Belgian shells, and 
after each discharge she would call the fort 
in Liege and direct the batteries there how to 
aim the next time. For days she had been 
risking her life to do this service for her coun- 
try. 

She was detected, tried by court-martial, 
convicted of violating the articles of warfare 
by giving aid to the enemy, and condemned to 
be shot. Next morning, this girl, blindfolded 
and with her arms bound behind her, faced a 
firing squad. As I conceive it, no more heroic- 
figure will be produced in this war than that 
Belgian girl, whose name the world may never 
know. 



ONLY A BROTHER 

SECOND PRIZE STORY 

"I do wonder why John didn't phone me 
last night when he promised me faithfully he 
would do so. Oh, well, I suppose he was too 
busy. Boys are doing something all the time 
anyway, and consider girls lucky when they 
call them up once a week. But, could he have 
called on some other girl last night? Oh, 
surely not, 1 know John wouldn't go to see 
anyone but me. But I should like to know, 
just the same, what he was doing." 

Such were the thoughts of pretty little Jane 
Harrington as she waited on the corner for 
a street car. If one had been watching her 
one would have seen her puckered, red lips 
change quickly from a pout to a shy, sweet 
smile, as she glanced down at a small gold pin, 
looking very much like a forbidden fraternity 
pin. It seemd to reassure her that John really 
was true to her and had been too busy with 
lessons to phone the evening before. 

Her thoughts were interrupted by the ap- 
proach of the street car. As she entered, more 
than one pair of admiring eyes turned to look 
at the attractive, trim little figure, carried with 
such poise and grace. She looked neither to 
right, nor left, as she passed up the aisle, nor 



LASELL LEAVES 



109 



did she notice who occupied the seat hack of 
the one she chose. She was just in the midst 
of planning her new dress for the senior 
dance — she had decided it was to he pink- 
when she heard her name mentioned by the 
girl behind her. 

"Do you know who Jane Harrington is?" 
she asked of her companion. 

"No, I don't," replied the other, with a 
shrill voice, "but, land knows, I have heard 
enough about her ! Every fellow I danced 
with at the last Junior dance, wanted to know 
if I knew her. I told them all 'No' and that 
1 didn't care to as I had heard she was a ter- 
rible snob. Bill Wallace is quite mad about 
her, talks about her all the time and— 

"Is Bill Wallace crazy about her?" broke in 
the friend. "Well, I don't think he'll get very 
far. He has money, but the girls and fellows 
he flies around with aren't the sort of people 
that Jane Harrington knows. And anyway, 
John Fellowes has first place with Jane. She 
is wearing his fraternity pin, you know." 
This was said in a tone of finality. 

"Wearing his pin !" sneered the shrill-voiced 
girl giving her big hat another yank, pulling it 
a trifle farther over her ear. "Is that any 
proof that he likes her better than anyone 
else? I kno\v, almost for a fact, that he has 
other pins that he lets girls wear. Why, only 
last night, he was over to Helen's house -to— 

Jane hurriedly rang the bell and left her 
seat. Her firm little chin was held much 
higher than when she had entered the car. 
Angry flashes darted from her clear, blue eyes 
and her heightened colour told of the turmoil 
that was raging within her. In order to es- 
cape hearing more, she had left the car two 
blocks before her corner, but what did that 
matter, now ! What did anything matter ! 
Just when everything had seemed so cheerful 
and happy, those few words had been uttered, 
which had hurt, dreadfully, her sensitive na- 
ture. A dark cloud had passed over all the 
brightness of a few moments before. Little 
things, w 



hich are said intentionally or unin- 



tentionally, often make a deeper wound than 
great things. 

"Well, Mr. John Fellowes, we'll see if two 
can't play this game. I'll show you who, and 
what, I am. I guess there are other fellows 
who would gladly give me their fraternity 
pins, who would not call on other girls and 
who would phone me when they promised. 
I'll make him sorry, and good and sorry, too." 
Two tiny fists clenched themselves tightly as 
she uttered this to herself. 

"For heaven's sake. Sis, what is wrong with 
you ? I never have seen such a grouch on you 
before, in all my life. Come on, smile! 
Cheer up! Nobody's dead!" exclaimed Frank 
at the breakfast table the next morning. He 
was one year Jane's senior, and was not only 
proud of the fact, but also strongly inclined 
to exercise his "older brother" privileges. 

It was twelve-year old Bob, who, always 
using his older brother as an example, piped 
up, "Yes that's what I say, Frank. She is so 
blamed peevish, you can't speak to her. Why, 
last night— 

"Flush, hush, children. Don't quarrel so !" 
Mrs. Harrington cautioned. "Really, boys, I 
think you are just as 'peevish,' as Bobby says, 
as Jane. Remember, it's late, so you haven't 
much time to quarrel, or you will be tardy at 
school." 

At that, the subject was dropped; the three 
finished their breakfast in silence, and then, 
hurried oft" to school. The conversation stili 
rankled Jane. Unpleasant thoughts filled her 
mind as she went from one class to another. 
How strange, that school could change so 
completely in one day ! Yesterday, everyone 
had been so nice and cheerful, and today, ev- 
eryone was so cross and ugly ; teachers scolded 
so much and assigned such long, hard lessons ; 
all her friends were so sullen when they spoke 
to her. Everyone was disagreeable, so it 
seemed. Jane, however, was the only one 
who was aware of this change in others. 

John Fellowes was conscious of a change in 
Jane, though. Something was wrong with 



110 



LASELL LEAVES 



her. When he called to her in the hall, she 
smiled sweetly, very, very sweetly, (not the 
frank, companionable smile he was used to) 
said good morning, just as sweetly, and passed 
on. Why nothing like that had ever happened 
before! Then, he saw her stop to talk with 
Bill Wallace. Her affected manner left her 
entirely and she slid into her lovable, frank 
ways once more. 

"So, it's Bill Wallace, now, instead of me," 
moaned poor, bewildered John. "But she 
can't be friendly with him. I won't have it. 
She's too good for him." 

He was not the only one who had seen this 
little episode, nor the only one who had fussed 
and fumed. It was a well-known fact that 
Frank Harrington could always be found not 
very far from his sister. So when he saw her 
talking to the obnoxious Bill Wallace, he 
quickly made his presence known, thereby 
putting an end to the conversation. This same 
thing happened more than once that morning 
and if Frank had had his eyes wide open, he 
would have noticed that John Fellowes was 
also near, with a beseeching, watchful eye on 
Jane. 

At one o'clock, just as Frank emerged from 
the huge, bronze door of the high school, he 
saw Jane drive off with Bill in his big Na- 
tional machine. This was too much. Jane 
was going a little bit too far. "I'll fix her," 
lie growled to himself as he dug his hands into 
his pockets and trudged angrily toward the 
car line. 

Jane did not arrive home until nearly five 
o'clock, where she met with a very cold re- 
ception. Frank stopped her in the hall, with 
a frown, and in an authoritative tone, de- 
manded, "Where have you been, Jane?" 

"Out riding. Why?" she asked innocently, 
taking off her hat and giving her bright curls 
a few pats. 

"'Why?' You know perfectly well 'why' 
I want to know. I have told you a hundred 
times, if I have told you once, to keep away 
from Bill Wallace," Frank exclaimed angrily. 



"I don't see why I can't go where, and with 
whom, I please without asking you. You're 
only my brother. And don't you say anything 
about Bill, either, Frank Harrington, because 
1 won't listen to you. You have taken a dis- 
like to him, so you tell me I can't go with him. 
What do you know about him?" heatedly in- 
quired Jane. 

"Never mind what I know, but I can tell 
you this much — he isn't fit to go around with 
a nice girl like you," he flared back. 

"Yes, but I notice that you go to see his 
sister once in a while." Jane assumed a tone 
of sugar-sweetness and tossed up her head as 
she touched this point. 

"Yes, I do. But I am myself, and you are 
my sister. I won't have anyone gossip about 
you and that is exactly what everyone will be 
doing if you don't watch out." 

"Let them gossip, then. I'll go with whom 
I please, Mr. Frank, and you can mind your 
own affairs," the incensed Jane stated em- 
phatically with a stamp of her well-booted 
foot. Tears were the result of this last out- 
break, so she fled from the room, leaving 
Frank standing, rather puzzled, in the middle 
of the floor. 

A half-hour later a half-subdued, half-angry 
boy knocked at the door of his sister's room. 
No one answered. 

"Jane," called a pleading voice. 

Still no answer. 

"Jane, please let me come in." 

A stifled sob was heard. As this sound 
reached his ears, Frank took it upon himself 
to enter without his sister's consent. On the 
bed was huddled a little, heaving bundle of 
humanity. At sight of her, Frank's feelings 
changed from anger to repentance. He had 
made his little sister cry. 

"Oh, I say, sis, don't cry," he began, awk- 
wardly stroking her hair, "I'm sorry, Honey, 
honestly, but I was so darned mad about see- 
ing you with that fellow that I just couldn't 
help saying what I did. I didn't mean half 
of it, though. Oh, I say, Jane, don't cry any 



LASELL LEAVES 



111 



more. I'll do anything you say if you'll only 
quit. You're the dearest, sweetest, prettiest 
sister a fellow ever had and you know I 
wouldn't hurt your feelings for anything in 
the world. Oh, I'm a great hig rummy, cub- 
he would have called himself many other 
names if he hadn't been interrupted, "D-don't, 
Frank, p-p-please," sobbed Jane, throwing 
her arms around her brother's neck, "I'm the 
one to be sorry, for w-what I said. You were 
right — I shouldn't be seen with Bill and I 
know it. I'm a great big baby and," she added 
wistfully, "I'm sorry, Frank." 

Frank would have continued to insist that 
he was to blame if he hadn't suddenly remem- 
bered John. 

"Say, I forgot all about John. He's down 
stairs waiting to see you," he exclaimed, start- 
ing for the door. 

"John! I hate him!" and the sobs were re- 
newed. 

"Whew! Now what's wrong? Had a 
light? You tell your big brother all about it 
and then I'll go down and beat him up," begged 
Frank, trying to pacify Jane once more. 

So, between sobs and sniffles, Jane blurted 
out her story. 

Frank roared at first and finally, said, giv- 
ing her a big hug, "You dear little goose, you ! 
That isn't true. I know, positively, that yon 
have the only John Fellowes fraternity pin in 
the country. He told me, among a lot of other 
things that I won't tell you, that if he couldn't 
take you to parties, he didn't care about going. 
When he was over to Helen's the other 
night — " 

Jane tugged at his sleeve and asked breath- 
lessly, "What was John doing over there ?" 

"For the meeting of the board of the "Star," 
of course. Why?" 

"That explains then, why he didn't phone 
me and why that girl said he was over to call 
on Helen. I'm so happy. I knew John 
wouldn't do anything to make me feel badly." 
A pretty smile now played about her lips. 

"You know he wouldn't, Sis, and neither 



would I. Now, get washed and brushed up a 
bit, while I go down to talk to John until 
you're ready. And, Sis honey," he paused at 
the door, "just remember, that even if I am 
'only your brother,' I'll stand by you and fight 
for you every time. It's a brother's privilege, 
you know." 

Edna Christensen. 



PART II. A MERRY CHRISTMAS 

(Continued from the Dec. Leaves) 

Ellen finding herself and the baby alone in 
the intense darkness was at first not able to 
grasp the situation. The fact just dawned 
upon her that the ship must be sinking and 
that she had been left to perish. The ship 
must be in immediate danger or the life boats 
would not have been lowered. Suddenly 
Ellen saw her clanger and knew she must at 
least make an effort to escape. Turning to 
the box of tools near the door she broke the 
glass and snatched out an axe. By sheer 
force in this time of peril she succeeded in 
battering down a heavy door from its hinges 
and with two heavy shawls she bound 
the baby and herself as best she could to the 
door and waited for the end. 

The Veladi began rapidly settling into the 
sea and scarcely ten minutes elapsed when it 
sank with a great heaving up of the waves, 
seeming to be devoured by the waters. 

Ellen's plan, however, was successful and 
the door raft was swept clear of the deck. 
Toward morning the storm had abated and 
the rain had ceased. 

Ellen opened her eyes to find herself in a 
small craft, being worked over by several 
roughly clad fishermen who were applying 
restoratives and jabbering in a strange tongue. 
Vaguely Ellen recalled the night before and 
her first thought was, "Where is Baby?" 

Suddenly a strange looking bundle in a sou' 
wester was thrust into her arms, and a baby 
cry issued therefrom. 

When Ellen's strength had returned suffi- 



112 LAS ELL LEAVES 

ciently, she sat up and began to ply questions, a tiny sung cradle in the airy little chamber 

at which the men looked strangely at one an- looking into the court, brilliant with flowers, 

other and she saw that it was useless to talk. Ellen after much gesticulating managed to 

So she settled into silence while the men make Mme. De Castro understand that she 

worked steadily trying to steer the course of wished to send a cable home but had no money, 

the craft into port. This was of small consequence and within a 

At last they arrived at the little stone dock, few minutes Ellen had dispatched a message 

on which many negroes were idly lounging, to her father whom she knew would be very 

Sveral in a small dug out canoe put out to- anxious, having probably received reports of 

wards the craft and brought Ellen and the the wrecked ship. That night a return cable 

baby and two of the fishermen up to the was received by Ellen stating that her father 

landing. had chartered a yacht and was leaving in the 

Evidently this was market day and the morning, 

drenched figure of Ellen caught the attention The shortest time in which Mr. Madison 

of all the passersby, who did not fail to stare could possibly reach Ellen was eight days and 

as is the custom of all Latin-American peo- in the mean time Ellen decided to make the 

pies. Apparently, the red cross on the coat best of her time and not to bemoan her fate 

sleeve was a thing which the people had nev- which might bave been many times worse, 

er seen before and these superstitious ones Yet she could not help but think of the ap- 

who had emerged from slavery barely sixty preach of Christmas time which had always 

years before thought perhaps she was some meant so much to her at home, and of all the 

sort of a saint. things which she had planned to accomplish 

Much to Ellen's dismay she found that she i n her new field of work. Now an entirely 

could not make herself understood and here new situation had presented itself, 

she was standing with a crowd of eager and Her Christmas spirit, however, was not long 

inquisitive faces about her. to be bowed down by these heavy thoughts 

At just this moment, Mme. De Castro, the and she set to work with a good will helping 

wife of the Commandante of the Island of Mme. De Castro in preparing a Christmas 

Mehia, was passing in her carriage. She saw remembrance for each of the poor children 

the sad plight of this young woman in the of Mehia. 

public square and ordered the coachman to The eight days seemed to have flown by on 

stop while she inquired the cause. wings before Ellen was able to realize that the 

Ellen felt that she had found some one to day was at hand when she was to see her 

help ber, but when she saw that she could not father from whom she had never before been 

make Mme. De Castro understand she separated, 

seemed almost ready to give up in despair. The morning came and Ellen was up and 

Mme. De Castro, however, motioned to Ellen dressed before the rest of the house had 

to get into the carriage and soon they stirred and having dressed the baby who was 

reached the beautiful little villa nestled usually the first in the household to awaken, 

among the trees and flowering shrubs on the took a little walk along the brightly covered 

sloping side of an extinct volcano. paths on the hillside. 

Mme. De Castro at once ministered to the At breakfast Ellen was so excited that she 

imperative needs of her guest and soon Ellen cou ld scarcely remain at the table and for- 

appeared very much changed, dressed in a tunately Mme. De Castro, though a for- 

gay, silken garment which indeed did justice eigner, could sympathize with the young 

to the wearer. The baby was put to sleep in girl. 



LASELL LEAVES 



113 



Each minute seemed hours to Ellen until 
at eleven o'clock the carriage appeared at the 
cottage to convey Ellen and the baby to the 
wharf. 

Yes ! the yacht had come in and Ellen could 
distinguish from the carriage her father's 
gaunt figure climbing into a dug out canoe 
which would bring him ashore. 

At last her father reached the same little 
stone wharf where Ellen had hrst entered the 
city. 

Mr. Madison's face wore a very expectant 
look and Ellen forgetting the presence of the 
dozens of loitering negroes threw open the 
carriage door and dashed up to her father. 
Caring nothing for the surroundings they 
gave each other a true American greeting. 

Mr. Madison was brought to earth by a 
native tapping him on the sleeve and re- 
minding him of the due payment, two mille 
reis, equal in our money to about sixty-five 
cents. 

Both Mr. Madison and his daughter were 
talking so rapidly at the same time that their 
conversation well-nigh resembled the native 
jargon. 

Up to this time Ellen's father had failed 
completely to notice the presence of the child 
and when he turned to the carriage and saw 
the little one, his face wore a look of the 
utmost astonishment and he exclaimed : 

"Why, wdiere did Fred Weston's baby boy 
come from? Where did you find this child 
which was stolen three weeks ago from his 
nurse in Leighton Park? There are detectives 
every where and a large ransom is offered. 
Please explain this mysterious circumstance." 

In a few r words Ellen made things clear to 
her father and soon they were being driven To 
the De Castro home. 

Sig. De Castro welcomed his guest with 
true hospitality, characteristic of men of his 
race, and before this congenial party 
realized it Christmas Eve had come. 

Ellen had told her father of the extreme 
poverty existing on the little island and Mr. 



Madison, big hearted as he was, gave a sum 
of money sufficient to provide each needy 
family with a Christmas dinner. 

Christmas Day dawned bright and beautiful 
—such a different Christmas from the dreary, 
lonesome one Ellen had expected. 

There was Christmas cheer in one home 
where Christmas was almost forgotten. This 
was the home of Mr. Fred Weston, the 
wealthy stock market dealer, who had received 
a message to the effect that his baby boy was 
safe. This bright Christmas day closed with 
a cable for Ellen from Mr. Weston : 

"This is our most happy Christmas. May 
Heaven bless you for your heroism in saving 
our son." 

Florence H. Hauslein. 



FROM GALICIA TO AMERICA 

We left our home, Kolbuszowa, Galicia, in 
the beginning of August, all happy and look- 
ing forward to a pleasant time at Carlsbad, 
Bohemia, where we go for a few weeks every 
year. We were there hardly two weeks when 
Avar was declared between Austria and Servia. 
All guests were advised to leave at once if 
they did not want to remain there indefinitely. 
We sent a dispatch to the rest of our family 
to come with us but we received answer, 
"Cannot, will write," (which writing we have 
never received). Since we could not return 
to Galicia, we fled to Ostende, Belgium, where 
we remained two weeks. The first days the 
picture at Ostende seashore was a very lively 
one, but soon this changed and solitary was 
the beach. The news came that the Germans 
had broken the neutrality of Belgium, and 
had advanced to Brussels. We five women 
and a little girl of four fled to England. We 
had trouble about money for no one wanted 
to accept bills. At a hotel restaurant I saw a 
young and elegantly dressed woman pay for 
her sandwich with a ring which she took from 
her finger. In going to England the sea was 
so full of mines that our ship was escorted by 
many small boats for protection. The first 



114 



LASELL LEAVES 



night in London we could not sleep for all the 
town was brightly illuminated by searchlights 
for fear of the German aeroplanes. We took 
a little house at Hampton Court, intending to 
stay there until the war was at an end. All 




Native Costume of Galicia 

strangers, however, were leaving the coun- 
try ; so we, too, went every day to the office 
so we, too, went every day to the office of 
the steamship company for tickets, but in 
vain. 

We suceeded at last in buying three tickets 
for S. S. Arabic to go to America. Three of 
my family had to remain and wait their 
chance to get passage. The ship was over- 
filled, and we were all in constant fear : mines 
below, aeroplanes above, and the enemy's ships 



around ; danger everywhere. The sea was 
rough, stormy ; lights were out most of the 
time. We saw some icebergs. It was a sad 
trip, leaving our dear country and half of the 
family, going to a strange land. Friends met 
us in Boston, and saw us off to New Paltz, 
New York, where my two aunts were. There 
we found at last a peaceful rest and a loving 
welcome. 

Hal a Zach. 



THE NORTH WIND 

From the frozen waste of the Northern shore, 

Where a mantle of snow is spread, 
From the stunted growth of the northern pine, 
That has bowed 'neath the Winter's tread ; 

From the ice-wall' d chasms and wind-swept 

plains. 
From the eider-duck's lonesome cry, — 
From the wondrous sheen of the Northern 

Light 
As it flames in the midnight sky ; 

From the ice-clad realm of the Eskimo, 

From the glittering tract of snow, 
To the verdant South in its sun-kissed bloom 
Where a mantle of green drapes low ; 

From the gorgeous North in its beauty wild, 
From the realm of the Winter King 

Sweeps the bold North Wind in triumphant 
strength, 

To the land of eternal Spring. 

Margaret Allen. 





CHRISTMAS DINNER 

The evening of Monday, December 14, we 
had our annual Christmas dinner and ex- 
changed our "slams" most of which were 
very clever and amusing. The tables were 
decorated very prettily and with the myste- 
rious packages neatly wrapped in tissue pa- 
per and ribbons, they presented a very fes- 
tive appearance. Toasts were offered by some 
of the teachers during the dinner and were 
immensely enjoyed. The "slams" were given 
to the children's box at the Christian En- 
deavor service following- the dinner. 



to Fraulein Heinrich for her excellent drilling. 
The reception which followed the play, for the 
German students and their guests was very 
delightful. 

Those who took part were: Martha Schu- 
mann, Hala Zach, Elsie Doleman, Isabel 
Bradley, Bernice Marx, Helen Overholser, 
Constance Risser, Ada Patterson, Marie 
Klenze, Myrtle Brix, Gladys Wilkes, Mar- 
garet Allen, Lavinia Fera, Hallie Dickey, 
Lael Irvine. 



The German Play and Reception Monday, 
December 14-, was a big success. The play 
was somewhat longer than that of last year 
but had the same quiet charm. The cast de- 
serve praise, but the greatest credit belongs 



Dr. Gordon's last chapel talk before vaca- 
tion, his Christmas message, deserves special 
mention. But thoughtf illness for the sick, 
the poor, the lonely, the young, the old 
should be exercised not only at Christmas 
time but all through the year. 



116 



LASELL LEAVES 



CHRISTMAS FROLIC 

On Saturday evening, Dec. 12, a Frolic 
was held in the Gym for the purpose of 
securing the money which was to be given 
to the Red Cross and Belgian Relief Fund. 
A little sketch "The Reveries of a Bachelor" 
was very cleverly staged. Marion Newland 
as The Bachelor was especially captivating 
and the girls almost lost their hearts. The 
girls who were his sweethearts were : 
The Childhood Sweetheart .. .Hallie Dickey 

The Athletic Girl Katharine Allen 

The Summer Girl. Evelyn Dunham 

The College Girl Marv Frances Moore 

The Widow Veda Ferguson 

The Nurse Anna Cornwall 

The Society Girl Helen Hardwick 

The Flirt Merveille Gratz 

His Mother's Ideal Eleanor Bothwell 

Flis Bride Catharine Carter 

The audience was so enthusiastic that 
the characters were called back repeatedly. 

After the entertainment was over a loud 
cry, " A Merry Christmas," shouted by Santy 
Avas heard and contrary to all precedents, 
instead of being presented with a gift, 
each girl put an envelope containing money 
into Santa's basket. When the money was 
counted the amount was $170.52. We all 
sincerely hope that at least a few of the suf- 
ferers were helped and made happier by 
this money. 



other old Lasell girl, Lillian Davison in 
Charlestown, West Virginia ; Veda Fergu- 
son visited the Lang girls in Waverley, New 
York, until December 31, when she left them 
to stay with the Bradley girls in Bolivar, 
New York, until school opened ; Ethel Mur- 
ray visited her room-mate, Florence Evans 
in Cincinnati, Ohio ; Lael Irvine visited a 
friend in New York City ; Margaret Powell 
visited Rose Baer in Lehighton, Penn., Edna 
Edwards spent her vacation with her broth- 
er in New York and Boston ; and Hala Zach 
spent her holidays with her mother in New 
York City. 



The "Specials" Christmas greeting found 
at each place in the dining room, at breakfast 
December 16, was appreciated very much. 
The "Specials" are truly never found napping. 



FACULTY TABLE 

December 15, at dinner the girls were sur- 
prised to have our esteemed faculty take 
their caps and gowns, pins, motto and hon- 
orary member in one grand glorious event. 
Led by Miss Nutt bearing a lantern, the 
faculty emerged from the kitchen in caps 
and gowns of their various degrees or more 
properly speaking, of their own devising, 
singing : 

Here we come with fife and drum, 

A glorious company ; 

Stately, staid and unafraid, 

We march to victory. 

Every mother's daughter ought to 

Flail this class with glee, — 

Bearers of the Lights o' Learning. 

Chorus 
Yo ho ! Yo ho ! Let's glad and merry be ! 
We know — we know from classes soon 

we're free, 
Lights-out bells, and school girl yells, and 

Bible Saturday, 
And fourteen to serve at table. 



Dec. 16 brougiit the long looked for Christ- 
mas vacations. The two hundred Lasell girls 
separated for their different homes- through- 
out the States ; or for visits if they could not 
go home. Billie Brix spent her holidays vis- 
iting an old Lasell girl, Judith Dollings in 
Wyoming, Ohio ; Katharine Hoag visited an- 



Yo ho ! Yo ho ! we'll pack the trunk for 

home ! 
Yo ho ! Yo ho ! Play music on the comb ! 
Lift the lights upon the heights, 
Then let them all burn blue, — 
Now we'll do what we want to ! ! 



LASELL LEAVES 



117 



After marching about they took their 
places in the middle of the dining room 
at a table decorated with their class color — 
green — adopted because it contrasts with 
themselves ; and with their vegetable, the 
cabbage, chosen because the best part is in 
the head and the heart. Seated at the table 
by the seniors, at urgent requests from the 
school they sang, to the tune of "Little 
Brown Jug," the following song: 

When day by day we're here toil-ing. 
We've not much time to dance and sing, 
But when the Big Wheel forgets to turn, 
WVd have you know we've time to burn. 

Chorus 

Ha! ha! ha! (dad are we! 
Oh such a frolicsome company ! 
Ha ! ha ! ha ! We are it. 
Now we're going to rest a bit. 

Later without recpiest they sang a song 
to the tune of Captain Jinks. 

We are a mighty Facultee 
And we know how to act you see 
And 'tis a mackerel fact that we 
Are on the road to joy now. 

Chorus 

We teach young ladies this and that 

This and that 

This and that 

We teach young ladies this and that 

But they'll no more annoy now. 

For we are going to be gay 

All through our Christmas holiday ! 

But we'll come back and have our say 

So don't you get too coy now 

Chorus 

Tra-la-la-la ! and we're girls ourselves, 

Girls ourselves 

Girls ourselves 

Tra-la-la-la ! and we're girls ourselves, 

And we'll go home in the morning. 



spicuously pinned to their gowns. They an- 
nounced their motto, "Safety First." Dr. 
Butters, the honorary member of that 
highly advanced class was present and re- 
ceived a hearty cheer, as did also the class 
poet, Miss Witherbee. 

The only thing w r e missed was the an- 
nouncement of the officers which could 
not be made because Miss Nutt had been dis- 
covered out without her rubbers and was 
on restrictions. At request Dr. Winslow 
gave a very expressive but quiet talk. After 
numberless puns had been exchanged be- 
tween the other tables and the faculty, the 
dinner came too soon to a close by the sing- 
ing of our Alma Mater. The faculty led bv 
Miss Nutt marched out of the dining room 
singing 

"We are a mighty Faculty." 



METHODIST RECEPTION 

The reception given by Dr. and Mrs. But- 
ters to Lasell girls and Boston University 
men, Monday night, January 11, in the Metho- 
dist Church, was royally enjoyed bv all. The 
formality of the affair was broken by a "One 
Step Grand March," led by Dr. and Mrs. But- 
ters. It was followed by readings by Mr. 
Pierce of the University. We then enjoved 
several songs by Marion Newland from 
Lasell. Mr. Hart of Dr. Butters' church, also 
sang some very entertaining selections. 
School songs and cheers were exchanged. Af- 
ter delicious refreshments and more readings 
bv Mr. Pierce and songs bv Mr. Hart, the 
happy evening came to a close. Massachu- 
setts had the largest number of people there '. 
Indiana, New York and Pennsylvania were 
next in order. 



When asked by the school to see their pins 
they gazed fondly at the clothes pins con- 



The -mid-winter term is here, after a happy 
vacation of jolly good times. The weather is 
not so pleasant as it is in the fall and spring ; 
so settle down to hard, earnest study and 
make this the very best term of work you 
have ever accomplished. 



118 



LASELL LEAVES 



The invitations to the Sophomores from the 
Seniors to "A Japanese Tea," January 16, 
are out. The Sophomores are looking for- 
ward with pleasure to the "Tea." 



CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR NOTES 

Dr. Butters, pastor of the Methodist 
Church, led the Christmas prayer-meeting, 
December the fourteenth. The keynote of 
his splendid message was the great joy of 
giving. 

Miss Parkhurst kindly consented to assist 
in the service by playing" our Christmas 
hymns. Some toys and useful Christmas 
gifts were brought to be distributed among 
our less fortunate friends. 

January the twelfth, we had one of the 
best meetings of the whole school year. Miss 
Helen Overholser, the representative of the 
Junior Class, as the leader, based her talk 
on the verse, 'T can do all things through 
Christ which strengthened me." "By mak- 
ing this verse our own" she said, "we can 
and will keep our New Year's Resolutions." 

Vespers 

Dr. Gordon, of Auburndale, in the Vesper 
service January tenth, impressed upon us 
the necessity of making each day a step 
nearer Christ if we would reach the Beau- 
tiful City. Dr. Gordon warned us, "If you 
lose one day, you will be just that much 
later in arriving." 



The annual Lasell Leaves Story Contest 
closed Jan. 12. A number of good stories 
were submitted to the committee which con- 
sisted of Mrs. G. M. Winslow, Miss Rand 
and Miss Hotchkiss. The first pr<'ze was 
awarded to Helen Pope, special, and the 
second prize was awarded to Edna Chris- 
tensen, special. 




MISS HELEN POPE 
WINNER OF FIRST PRIZE 




MISS EDNA CHRISTENSEN 
WINNER OF SECOND PRIZE 







A family reunion and wedding" occurred 

n November 29th in the home of Mr. and 

Mrs. Bernard MacDonald of South Pasa- 

lena, Calif., the fair bride being our Hilda 

MacDonald and the groom Mr. Roy Walter 

Sheppard of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Lasell 

riends will be doubly interested to know 

hat Hilda and Edna, '11, have married 

)rothers. After a wedding tour in the 

groom's car, Mr. and Mrs. Sheppard settled 

n Idaho Falls, Idaho, which is to be their 

uture home. 

Another Pacific Coast wedding was that 
)f Muriel Fuller to Mr. George Lowrv Col- 
>urn on Wednesday, December 30th, at Los 
\ngeles, Calif. 

On Monday, January 4th, occurred the 
narriage of Josephine Clapp, '13, to Mr. 
Bertram B. Bellows at Toledo, O. At pres- 
nt Mr. and Mrs. Bellows are taking an 
xtended wedding journey and our principal 
inderstood from Josephine that their itiner- 
ry would include Jamaica, where she hoped 
o see the Cox sisters. After the first of 
darch Mr. and Mrs. Bellows will be at 
lome at 2353 Fulton Street, Toledo, O. 



Our congratulations to these happy young 
people ! 

Annie Crow's letters are always interest- 
ing, but the last was the best, for among 
other news was the announcement of her 
engagement to Mr. William Henry Collum. 
Annie tells us that Mr. Collum is in active 
service in the army and of course it is im- 
possible for them to make any very definite 
plans. She has told us enough of this young 
officer to lead us to extend to her our most 
hearty congratulations, and for their sakes. 
as well as for our own, we pray for a speedy 
ending of this awful conflict. 

Florence Swartwout, '09, too, has sent us 
the most interesting news yet, the an- 
nouncement of her engagement to Mr. Fran- 
cis F. Thomas of New York City. We would 
like to tell all that we know about this fine 
young lawyer but don't quite dare without 
Florence's permission. 

In a recent letter from Marion Shinn, '11, 
to Doctor Winslow, she promises to "write 
up" her escape from the war zone this sum- 
mer, pays a deserved compliment to Susan 
Tiffany's recent article in the "Leaves" con- 



120 



LASELL LEAVES 



cerning. her travel, and also adds a word 
concerning the engagement of Edna Kauff- 
man, '11, and also Vera Bradley, '11, but does 
not furnish us with the names of the fortunate 
young men. We hope to complete this in- 
teresting announcement later. 

During the holiday season, Martha Haze- 
let Crooks, '10, gave a unique luncheon 
which turned into a surprise party for all 
of the guests save one, for at this Yuletide 
festival she announced the engagement of 
her sister, Elizabeth, to Mr. Paul Wise. 
Friends at Lasell who had the pleasure of 
meeting this former Tech. student are most 
hearty in their congratulations. 

Through Clara MacDonald, '14, we learn 
of the arrival of a new cousin, a little son 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Harold B. Sheppard 
(Edna MacDonald, '11 ) on January 2nd. We 
have not yet learned the name, but this lit- 
tle Lasell boy is none the less welcome. 

Elizabeth Peirce Bittenbender and her 
husband are rejoicing over the coming of 
their little son, Thomas Austin, on January 
7th. 

A host of old Lasell °irls will be saddened 
to learn of the sudden death of Dorothy 
Steele, which occured December 28th. Since 
leaving Lasell, she had been very active in 
church and philanthropic work and had en- 
deared herself to a host of needy people as 
well as warm personal friends. Our tender 
sympathy is extended to her bereaved fam- 
ily and especially to her sister Katherine. 

A line received from Lena Vee Kelley, '14, 
tells of the unexpected passing away of Mr. 
E. D. Newcomb, our Ruby's ('14) father. 
We have not yet learned the particulars, but 
hasten to extend our heartfelt sympathy to 
Ruby and her bereaved family. 

Among our new students, we are glad to 
welcome Eloise Bordages, Gladys Thorpe 
and Alice Grazier. W r e are delighted also 
to have again in the school family Mildred 
Westervelt, '13, who is specializing in Do- 



mestic Science, and Lucile Scott, '14, who 
will devote herself entirely to music. 

Lucy Wilson Errett, '06, is not forgetting 
to speak a good word for her Alma Mater, 
and we hope through her to receive one of 
our best new students for next year. In her 
letter to Doctor Winslow, she expresses the 
hope that having once visited the Chicago 
Lasell Club meeting he will keep up the 
good habit. These assurances of continued 
interest in, and love for Lasell on the part 
of her "old girls" is gratifying. All of Lucy's 
good wishes are heartily reciprocated. 

Doctor and Mrs. Winslow and family 
spent a part of the Christmas vacation in 
their old home in Vermont, visiting their 
parents. The children give some delightful 
and original accounts of this, their first win- 
ter journey. 

One of our most attractive New Year 
cards is one announcing the engagement o 
Ruth Wardrobe Thacher to Mr. Henry Lea- 
vitt Brown. With our acknowledgment we 
extend hearty congratulations! 




MISS DORIS WALLER, THE NEW EDITOR OF 
"LEAVES" 




R tA Q V 



i 






// 



// 



u. 




Another year has passed. All of us look 
back on 1914 with many, many, happy mem- 
ories but we hold out our hands in hearty 
welcome to the new year and its untried joys 
and experiences. As we think over the last 
year we can see many things that we wish 
had been different, but it is past now, and we 
find encouragement in the fact that we can 
begin again. I suppose we have all made our 
New Year's resolutions and, just as promptly 
have broken them, but let us all try during the 
year to do just one thing — our very best. 

We all hope that this year is going to do a 
great deal for the world. We hope that be- 
fore 1915 comes to a close, we may hear of 
peace in Europe, that many of the philan- 
thropic problems of the world may be nearer 
solution, and coming back to our own little 
world we hope that Lasell may make a great 
stride forward in scholarship, in athletics, and 
in social service. May the year 1915 be 
her most successful and happy one ! 

"Forenoon and afternoon and night, — Fore- 
noon, 

And afternoon, and night, — Forenoon, and 
what ! 

The empty song repeats itself. No more? 

Yea, that is Life : make this forenoon sublime, 

This afternoon a psalm, this night a prayer. 



And Time is conquered, and thy crown is 
won." 



Now that Christmas vacation is over we 
are looking forward with great anticipation 
to the next important event — the White 
Mountain trip. Most of you New Girls have 
more than likely heard from the Old that we 
start on a Friday ; probably the twelfth of 
February this year, and go to the Bellevue 
Hotel a1 Intervale, New Hampshire, where we 
stay until the following Monday noon. Any 
girl who does not live where she can use to- 
boggans, snowshoes, skiis, or snow-bicycles 
should surely take advantage of this chance 
because during this trip she has the oppor- 
tunity of trying out all of these new sports. 
Can you imagine anything more delightful 
than moonlight tobogganning, when after a 
long, fast slide down the icy hill, you dash. 
into a soft heap of snow and lie there a few 
moments, looking up at the beautiful sky and 
stars ; or a wonderful hot dinner of bacon, 
sandwiches, steaming coffee, biscuits, dough- 
nuts, cheese and apples, eaten around a huge 
wood fire out in the open, after a two-hour 
climb up into Catherdal Woods? Don't those 
things sound tempting? Really these are 
three wonderful and never-to-be-forgotten 
days, and, if possible, everyone ought to have 
them. 




The October issues of The High School En- 
terprise, The Taller ( Kinston, N. C), and 
Thyme and Lavender" arrived too late to be 
acknowledged in the November or December 
issues of Lasell Leaves. 

The following November numbers arrived 
after our December number had gone to 
press : — 

The Mirror (Birmingham, Ala.), New 
Trier Echoes, The Red and Green, The Re- 
view (Galveston, Tex.), The Sagamore, The 
Tatler (Huntington, W. Va.), Tileston Topics, 
The Triangle. 

Lasell Leaves acknowledges with pleasure 
the December issues of the following maga- 
zines : — 

Abbot Observer, The Academian, The Aca- 
demic Observer, The Advance, The Aegis 
(Beverly, Mass.), The Aegis (Houston, Tex.), 



The Alpha, The Artisan, The B. H. S. Tatler, 
The Billows, The Blue and White, The Bon 
Bon, The Booster, The Boston University Bea- 
con, The Budget, The Bugle, The Centralian, 
The Clarion, Dean Megaphone, The Dial, The 
Echo, The Elgin High School Mirror, The 
Gleam, The Gold and Black, The Hermonite, 
The Imp, The Iris, The Jabberzvock, King 
Edward's School Chronicle, Knick Knacks, 
The Lawrence Bulletin, The Lion, The Lotus, 
The Magpie ( Waterbury, Ct. ) The Magpie 
(New York City), The Maroon and White, 
The Messenger, The Miltonvalc College Mon- 
itor, The Mirror (Birmingham, Ala), The. 
Mirror (Bethlehem, Pa.), The Mirror, 
(Sharon, Pa.), The Missile, The News, New 
Trier Echoes, Newton High School Review, 
The Optimist ( Bloomington, Ind.), The Op- 
timist (Newark, N. J.), The Oracle (Mont- 



LASEL LEAVES 



123 



gomery, Ala.), The Oracle (Plainfield, N. J.), 
The Orange, The Orange and Green, The Ot- 
toman, Pasco School News, The Peningian, 
The Philomath, The Radiograph, The Ramble, 
The Record, The Sage, The Sangra, The 
School Review, The Scroll, The Shamokin 
High School Reviezu, Shucis, Stevens School 
Review, 'The Student (Brazil, Ind.), The 
Student (Manchester, Vt), The Tatler (Eliz- 
abeth City, N. C), The Tatler (Kinston, N. 
C), The Tatler (El Paso, Texas), The Tat- 
ler (Huntington, W. Va.), The Tiger, The 
Topic. University School News, Vail Deane 
Budget, The Vindex, The Virginian, Wise 
Acres, The X-Ray. 

The following January issues have arrived 
early : — ■ 

The Argus, Echoes, High School News, The 
World. 



WHAT WE THINK OF THEM 

The Billows — You are one of the few school 
magazines to publish a continued story. We 
hope the second installment of "The Friend- 
ship Christmas Dinner" will be as interesting 
as the first. 

"The New Junior," in the December num- 
ber of The Blue and White, is excellent. 

The Budget — We like the sentiment of the 
>oem " Christmas Day" better than the one 
>n which it is a parody. 

The Ccntralian — One of our best and most 
complete exchanges. Probably we have all 
often wished for a "Land of Beginning 
Again." 

The Magpie — A very neat and attractive 
paper. 

The Mirror (Birmingham, Ala.) — Your lit- 
erary department is complete, and the cover 
design of your Thanksgiving number is very 
appropriate to the season. 

The Sangra — We welcome you as a new ex- 
hange, and hope to see you often. "The 
Ghost of Silent Bay" is a very weird story. 

The cover design of the December Topic is 
neat and artistic. A table of contents would 
be a convenience to your readers. 



The Triangle — We are glad to welcome 
such a valuable addition to our exchange table. 
Playlets, such as "The Isle of Ifalik," are 
rather unusual in school papers. 

Knick Knacks — It is interesting to see, by 
the photographs, how Shady Side Academy 
has grown since it was built. The picture of 
the present building is very attractive. 

The Tatler (Kinston, N. C.) — You have 
good Literary and Joke departments. A few 
cuts would improve it greatly. 

Maroon and White — Your "worst" number 
is very good and your cuts exceptionally so. 
If the advertisements were all kept out of the 
story part, wouldn't it improve the looks of 
your paper? 

The Tatler (Huntington, W. Va.) — You 
have an excellent paper and it shows that you 
have good school spirit. 

Lawrence High School Bulletin — Your stor- 
ies are entertaining, but you lack cuts. 

The Magpie ( DeWitt Clinton H. S., N. Y.) 
-You have an excellent magazine, and you 
are fortunate in having good cuts. 

High School Enterprise — Like most others, 
you lack cuts, otherwise a good magazine. 

The Aegis (Houston, Texas) — A well ar- 
ranged paper. 

The Gleam — Your December cover is beau- 
tiful. A rearrangement of departments would 
greatly improve your paper. 

Optimist (Newark, N. J.) — An attractive 
paper, and well arranged. 

77/ <• Lion — You have a pleasing Christmas 
cover. Your pink sheet is novel. 



WHAT THEY THINK OF US 

Lasell Leaves — You are one of our best 
magazines. All of your departments are well 
written. The author of "Which" shows that 
she is well acquainted with the two types of 
school girls represented. The account of your 
trip to Charlestown makes us wish to have 
been with you. All your stories are well 
written. But we are very much interested in 
"Kathryn" and arc impatiently waiting for 
the next issue. — The Messenger. 



124 



LASELL LEAVES 



Lasell Leaves — W eare always glad to see 
your paper among our exchanges. We fail 
to see any criticism of our paper in your ex- 
change column. We would be pleased to re- 
ceive the censure of a paper with your stand- 
ing. — The Abbott Observer. 

Found — An interesting, clever, newsy paper 
is Lasell Leaves, Boston, Mass. — E. O. H. S. 

News. 

Lasell Leaves — A splendid paper from cover 
to cover. The pictures are very attractive, 
and the play of two acts entitled "Which" is 
very good. — The Academic Observer. 

Lasell Leaves is well put together and inter- 
esting. There are some very clever bits of 
poetry. We hope the next chapter of "Kath- 
ryn" will be as good as the first. — The Magpie. 

Lasell Leaves — Your magazine is very at- 
tractive and is very well proportioned. The 
cuts add a great deal to it. It is the best ex- 
change we have received this year. — The Bon 
Bon. 

The Lasell Leaves is among the very best 
of our exchanges. Its cuts are extremely in- 
teresting and attractive. What an extensive 
marriage column you have! — Knick Knacks. 

We like the thought of this poem, "Keep 
your Faith," in Lasell Leaves. — The Mirror. 

Lasell Leaves has, as usual, good stories and 
attractive cuts. — The Scroll. 

Lasell Leaves — Your Commencement num- 
ber is very interesting. Your cuts are espec- 
ially attractive. — The Philomath. 

Lasell Leaves — Fine. Your frontispiece is 
very good. Your exchange department is ex- 
ceptionally good. Everything is well written. 
— The Blue and White. 

Lasell Leaves is a very attractive magazine : 
we. note especially the cuts and the good print- 
ing. — The Centralian. 



Disappointing. — "How's that book you were 
just reading?" 

"Oh, it's another of those publications in 
which a corking good title is spoiled by the 
story. — Ex. 

Author : "I have written a novel, entitled 
'What a Woman Wants.' Can you publish 
it ?" 

Publisher: " I fear not. We are not un- 
dertaking anything that runs over six hundred 
pages." — Ex. 

EMBARRASSING 

Mae — I was in a very embarrassing position 
this morning ! 

Fae — What was it? 

Mae — I had to rescue a man from drowning 
when he was teaching me to swim ! — Ex. 



r 



•*\ 



Discount to College Girls 

Why pay $4 and $5 for your shoes and slippers when 
you can buy the same quality, style and finish for 
$2, $2.50 and $2.75. Try us and be convinced. 




^. 



SATIN EVENING SLIPPER 

i n all colors to harmonize with every costume. Silk 
stockings to match at 45 cents the pair. You cannot 
equal these these prices elsewhere and with our goods. 

WEBER'S SAMPLE SHOE OUTLET 

564 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON 

UP ONE FLIGHT OPP. ADAM HOUSE 



J 



LASELL LEAVES 



125 



LASELL STUDENTS 

Will Make No Mistakes 
In Depending Upon 

New England's 
Greatest Store 

FOR THEIR VARIOUS NEEDS 



Here one may choose from 

unequaled assortments of 

Clothing Furnishing Rugs Pictures 

Artwares Trunks and Luggage 

and the many other things so frequently 
needed during college days 



Best of all, selection here is never from 
commonplace stock but from the best that 
Europe and America can produce 



Jordan Marsh Company 



BOSTON 



EVENING DRESSES 
AFTERNOON DRESSES 

Youthful Supplies for Misses 




Prices $16.50 to $125.00 

Cfjanbler & Company 

151 Fremont Street, Boston 



98 



LASELL LEAVES 



CORDUROY 
NEGLIGEES 



That are New 



Warm as a Blanket and Rich 
and Attractive in appearance 

Made of Pink, Cherry, Wistaria, Blue and Ca- 
nary Corduroy, lined throughout with white silk 
in long loose robe effects. 

A $12.00 NEGLIGEE 

FOR $8.50 

(MAIL AND TELEPHONE ORDERS GIVEN 
CAREFUL ATTENTION) 

C. F. Hovey Company 

Summer, Chauncy and Avon Streets 
BOSTON, MASS. 




(Upu iSoum 



160 Tremont Street 

Over Moseley a 



c *3fP' 

Luncheon 

11-3 

Afternoon Tea 

3.30-5 30 



The Plastic Shoe 



(Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 




In Low or High Cut 
and also in Pumps 



The Plastic Shoe 
is the result of 30 
years of study in 
the search for a 
shoe that will help 
all foot troubles and 
still retain a grace- 
ful appearance. 

The Plastic Shoe 
assists one to walk 
as nature intended. 
It removes the 
strain and ache 
resulting from walk- 
ing or standing in 
ill fitting shoes. 



Thayer, McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



When You Visit Lasell Stop at 

NYE PARK INN 

46 GROVE STREET 
Between the Seminary and Station 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

FIRE PROOF GARAGE 



LASELL LEAVES 



127 



CHINA AND GLASS 

The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in this line 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glass 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits every season by our buyers to the 
best makers in Great Britain, France, Germany, Austria and Amer- 
ica. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS Gallery 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

FRANKLIN, COR. HAWLEY ST., BOSTON 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 



Compliments of 

GEO. J. BARKER LUMBER CO. 

WALTHAM, MASS. 

George C. Folsom 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 

W. F. HADLOCK 
Newsdealer and Stationer 

Developing and Printing 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CAPODANNO & ALBANO 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 
Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco. 

331 AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Tel. Con. 

G. A. DONOVAN 

345 AUBURN STREET AUBURNDALE 

Ladies' and Men's Furnishings 

Dry Goods and Small Wares 



ELLIOTT W. KEYES 
PHARMACIST 
Drugs- Medicines-Chemicals-Choice Confections 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 




HAYDEN 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 

College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 

COTTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS and GOWNS 

to the American Universities and 
Colleges, to Lasell Seminary and 
scores of other Academies. 

CLASS CONTRACTS A 
SPECIALTY. 

PULPIT and CHOIR GOWNS. 



newton Tee Company 

MILLER BROS. 

Addas'" Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 



PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Receipts 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 PORTLAND STREET, BOSTON 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for Price List of over 60 kinds 



CARDS AND CilFTS 

The New Slio 

149 TREMONT ST., ROOM 923, BOSTON, MASS. 

Waists and Dresses Made at Low Prices 
WAISTS $3.50 DRESSES $8.00 & $10.00 

C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 

Jfflustc Bealers 

Announce their Removal to 

2B Park Street, Boston. Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Three doors above their old store. Send for our recent 
catalogues. Mail orders filled the same day as received. 
Music sent on selection if desired. 




128 



LASELL LEAVES 



SCHOOL 
STATIONERY 



Note Books 

Students' Paper 
Fountain Pens, etc 



Engraved and Printed 



Programs 



Invitations 



Dance Orders 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON 7 SQUARE 

BOSTON - - - MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 686 Haymarket 



SPORT COATS 

MACKINAWS 

SERGE MIDDY SUITS 



SPECIALTIES 

FOR 

COLLEGE GIRLS 



Send for Illustrated Booklet 

Henry S. Lombard 

22 to 26 Merchants Row 
BOSTON, MASS. 




Ladies are delighted 

with the results of using Camp- 
bell's Stain on Floors, Furni- 
ture and Woodwork. 

Gives superb finish, brings out 
the natural grain of the wood. 
Write for color card 

Carpenter-Morton Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Established 1882 



Incorporated 1904 



GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 Boylston Place, Boston, Mass. 

College Dramatic Work a Specialty 
Telephone Oxford 145 



jUaugusi 
^Printing 
Company 

MellesHep 
jWas&acfjusietts 



Telephones Hay market 2311-2312 



Flowers 
of Quality 



HOUGHTON -GORNEY CO, 

:-: Florists :-: 



119 TREMONT STREET, 

[Park Street Church] 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Specialty 

Flower Shop of Boston 



FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED TO ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Free Delivery to Lasell 



c 



LA5ELL LEAVE5I 




Vol. xxxx 



No. 5 



FEBRUARY, 1915 



TWO STUDIOS 



164 
TREMONT 
STREET 
Telephone Ox- 
ford 2687 





Kait photon 

RT in relation to PORTRAIT 
PHOTOGRAPHY is the 

realization of beauty, grace and 
intelligence, as expressed in the finished 
portrait. 

Our advanced 1915 styles we honestly believe 
will appeal to you. Special discount rates to 
all Lasell Students. 



161 

TREMONT 

STREET 

Telephone 

Oxford 858 




Our Stock Never Gets Old 




WHOIFSALE 



CHARGE 

ACCOUNTS 

OPFNElf 



Diamonds 
Watches 
Silver Goods 
Combs 
Cut Glass 
Coral Jewelry 
Roman Pearls 
Ebony Goods 



ARRIVE EVERY DAY 

Vanity Cases 
Photo Frames 
Leather Goods 
Fountain Pens 
Brass Goods 
Chafing Dishes 
Percolators 
Parisian Ivory 



Our Watch and Jewelry Repair Departments do 
the best work at very low prices 

MR. F. F. DAVIDSON 
AUBURNDALE 



LASELL LEAVES 



129 



A. SHUMAN & CO 



The Service Store, Boston 



Tailored Apparel for 
College Girls of 
Rare Distinction 



Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabrics — 

Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 

Splendid Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

ld>li Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 






We Can Please You 

Come and See for Yourself 

Dry Goods, Small Wares, Dress Goods, Silks, 
Velvets, Linings, Laces, Gloves, Ribbons, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Hosiery, Underwear, Millinery, Cloth- 
ing, Hats, Caps, Shoes, and Garments of every 
description. 



P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-135-137-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 



THE ONE GREAT TREASURE 

FOR EVERY STUDENT 

The Family Music Book 



800 PAGES 
CLOTH 



$ 



1 



252 PIECES 
BOUND 



Contains $50 worth of music — vocal 
and instrumental. 

(Transit to Lasell 10 cents extra) 

Circular with complete information sent 
upon request. 

THE BOSTON MUSIC CO. 

26 and 28 West Street Boston, Mass. 

PUBLISHERS THE B M C EDITION 



130 



LASELL LEAVES 



NEARLY A CENTURY IN 

CARPETS AND RUGS 

Few concerns in this country have so long a business 
record and none in Floor Coverings. 

A large, well selected stock, shown by experienced 
salesmen and the same methods that won the respect and 
patronage of parents and grandparents we believe will 
prevail with the present generation. 

Quality considered, it is our purpose not to be under- 
sold by any of our competitors. 

EVERYTHING IN FLOOR COVERINGS 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

646-650 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St. 



Meyer Jonasson & Go 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS.. BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Waists, Furs and Sweaters 



GARMENTS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 
A SPECIAL FEATURE 




Correct Overgaiter Effects 



This model comes in 
Patent Leather o r 
Gun Meta), Spanish 
heels, and Cloth or 
Leather Tops in Gray, 
Black and Fawn. 

PRICES $6 TO $12 

10% cash discount to 
students and faculty of 
Lasell. 



160 Tremont Street, Boston 




IksELL Leaver 



DUX FEMINA FACTI" 



Vol. XXXX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., FEBRUARY, 1915 No. 5 

Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 




LIST OF OFFICERS 




Subscription Editor 


FLORENCE EVANS 




Editor-in-chief 
DORIS WALLER 




FRANCES HARRIS 


CAROL RICE 




Associate Editor 
Art Editor 






Local Editor 




EDITH HODGES 




Exchange Editor 


ELEN BENSON 

Assistant 


Art 


Editor, CHARLOTTE 
Personal Editor 


WHITING 


MAUDE HAYDEN 

Assistant Exchange Editor 
ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 




CATHARINE CARTER 







Assistant Local Editor ROSE BAER 



S t aff Photographer BESS EM ERINE 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 

Things Worth While 

Lunch in the Mountains {frontispiece) 132 Personal 

Literary 133 Editorial 

^ocals - 137 Exchanges 



142 
144 

143 
148 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar Inside front cover 

rhomas Long Inside front cover 

\. Shuman & Co. 129 

Pinkham & Smith 129 

P. P. Adams -. 129 

chirmer 129 

T. E. Moseley Co. .. 130 

Mever Jonasson & Co. 130 

fonn H. Pray & Sons Co. 130 

Thandler & Co. 151 

fordan Marsh Co. ... 151 

Thayer, McNeil Co. 152 

^ F.Hovey & Co. . 152 

English Tea Room 152 

Sfye Park Inn 152 

\. T. Bridges 153 

The New Shop 153 



C.W.Thompson 

Cottrell & Leonard 

W. F. Hadlock . 

Capodanno & Albano 

C. A, Donovan 

Elliott W. Keyes __ 

Hayden 

Newton Ice Co 

Geo. J. Barker Lumber Co. . 
Jones. McDuffee & Stratton 

George C. Folsom 

Damon 

H. S. Lombard 

Carpenter, Morton 

George P. Raymond 

Maugus Printing Co. 

Allerlei 

Houghton-Gorney Co. 



153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
154 
154 
154 
154 
154 
155 
156 




FRANZ KOLNER 

"Died, in this city at 8 o'clock last even- 
ing, Franz Kolner, aged 67." In those sim- 
ple words there was not much, apparently, to 
make me pause or think deeply; yet pause 
I did and though I tried to interest myself 
in all sorts of worthy and unworthy news, 
with which the morning paper was filled, I 
found my mind constantly reverting to 
those two lines in an obscure corner of one 
of the sixteen pages before me. Perhaps 
out of the thousands who read that paper 
on that particular morning, I was the only 
one, or at least one of a mere handful, who 
more than glanced at that notice. Yet, 
had those in the height of social fame deigned 
to study the inconspicuous life of this man, 
their whole lives might have been sweetened 
by contact with him. True, he could have had 
no great worldly wealth or prestige or else 
even the newspapers would have remarked 
his decease more prominently. Yet, by 
mere chance, I had heard his story from a 
little Swedish servant girl, one of his de- 
voted friends. No one could be anything 
but devoted, if a friend to Franz Kolner. 

Since he was never much of a hand to 
talk about himself, even the dearest friends 
of Franz Kolner had only a hazy idea of 
his past. Only a few definite facts were 
known and these were that his father had 
been a scientist of no .mean note in Vienna, 
who had accumulated quite a fortune through 



his research work; that his mother had 
died when Franz was but a little child and 
that the motherless lad had grown into a 
brilliant but wayward young man. While 
in college, he had fallen victim to the gam- 
bling fever and had, bit by bit, played away 
his money until one night he had found him- 
self penniless and with obligations which 
would carry away a part of his father's 
wealth. He parted with all his possessions 
which were salable and with the money 
thus gained sought to lessen his debts. 
Dressed in a shabby suit of clothes and 
with little of his former dapper appearance, 
he applied the following week for work on 
a liner bound for America. Behind him he 
left a long, earnest letter for his father, a 
letter full of determination to right himself 
in his father's eyes by proving to be a man 
in America. As soon as he should become 
worthy, he would return to Vienna. He 
wanted no pity, no sympathy; only asked 
that he might hear that his father was well. 
A letter sent to New York City, General 
Delivery, would reach him. 

During those first few weeks of utter 
loneliness in the new land he came to realize 
the helplessness of the immigrants to our 
country and, while hunting for a place where 
he might earn a living, he was keenly alive 
to the fact that he was only one among 
thousands who were alone, friendless, down 
trodden. He began to develop a keen interest 



134 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



in his brothers and sought to help them. 
Then one day came a notice from his father's 
lawyer. A terrible explosion had taken 
place in his father's laboratory and in the 
accident Mr. Kolner had been killed. With 
the love and understanding of a father, Mr. 
Kolner had forgiven the boy Franz every- 
thing and in his will left all to him. Un- 
hindered now by lack of funds, Franz Kolner 
could begin his charitable work among the 
foreigners in the great city. 

No one knew that Franz Kolner had money 
enough to live almost in luxury had he so 
chosen. Had outsiders been aware of 
this fact, they would doubtless have mis- 
construed the meaning of the light which often 
burned so late in the little bare room in a 
lodging house on Eversburg Street where 
Franz Kolner lived. Doubtless, some one 
would have remarked, "The miser is count- 
ing his gold." Instead of this, one in whom 
beat one of the greatest, kindest hearts 
in the world was there, poring by the hour 
over translations that, through the knowl- 
edge thus gained, he might be better able to 
aid his less fortunate brothers from foreign 
shores whom he met in his work in the 
slums. All that could be spared from his 
inherited money, save what he actually 
needed in order to live decently, went to 
aid those in need ; and such were not hard 
to find. 

Although Franz Kolner's own room was 
bare of pictures, I doubt not but that he had 
a richer gallery than many a multi-mil- 
lionaire; for as he sat there, often alone, 
I can well believe that before his mind passed 
in endless review, pictures: the faces of 
those whom by his self-sacrifice and ser- 
vice he had made happier, pictures of homes 
where his coming was the one event of cheer 
in their dreary lives. 

Among those who have come to our land, 
ignorant and needy, there is deep mourning 
for a friend. They, in their ignorance are the 
only ones who have appreciated this man and 
the words which they cannot read, we in our 



learning read but cannot appreciate, for to 
us it is only "Died, in this city at 8 o'clock 
last evening, Franz Kolner, aged 67." 

MarouriteBelt. 



THE DEAF AND DUMB BALL 

It was New Year's eve when the young 
men and women of the Deaf and Dumb Insti- 
tute held their annual ball. About two 
hundred happy mutes were mingling together 
and seemed to be having as joyful a time as 
people fortunate in having the powers of 
speech and hearing. The expressions on 
their faces seemed to speak of their happiness. 

To me, an onlooker, the occasion was 
most enjoyable. The most noticeable thing 
was the silence of the great hall. Very differ- 
ent did it seem from our parties. Groups of 
young people were gathered here and there 
not chattering at a merry rate, but making 
queer gestures with the hands. Where the 
music broke the silence now and then, it was 
wonderful to watch them dance as they 
seemed to keep in perfect rythm with the 
music. 

After watching the dancers for a short time, 
I noticed two of the members who seemed 
to be having a difficult time to converse. 
Finally the young man must have persuaded 
his fair friend to dance for they soon whirled 
away, over the polished floor. When the 
music ceased, the couple took their seats, 
while I continued to watch them. During 
the course of the evening, the two young 
people danced together several times. 

While the refreshments were being served, 
I found my favorite couple seemingly having 
a very hot discussion. As I watched them I 
decided that the girl could not understand 
what her partner was trying to tell her and 
was becoming impatient. Finally in despera- 
tion, she stamped her foot and spoke in an 
angry tone, "I don't know what you are 
trying to tell me." 

In silence and amazement, he looked at 
her; then he said, "Can you talk?" 

It was now her turn to look surprised. 



LASELL LEAVES 



135 



After a moment's thought she spoke, "Well, 
how do you happen to be here since you are 
not a mute?" 

"I am the reporter from the Daily Sun and 
may I ask the same of you?" 

"Well, I am the Society Editor for the 
Daily Republican," she confessed. 

The last I saw of the interesting couple, 
they were making their way to the buffet. 

E. Lucas. 



A NIGHT IN THE CANADIAN WOODS 

I was spending a week up in the lumbering 
camps in Canada one summer. The tavern 
where I was staying was in the widest part 
of the camp beside the Saskatchewan river, 
down which the logs were sent from the 
camp to their destination. 

One evening I was walking along the 
river bank when I saw a young girl coming 
towards me. I stepped to one side to let her 
pass, but she stopped before me and asked 
me whether I was going back to the tavern. 
If I were, since it was getting late she 
would like to walk back with me, for her home 
was not far from the tavern. Very will- 
ingly I started towards the tavern. After 
we reached there she did not want me to 
take her any farther, but I insisted on see- 
ing her safely to her home. 

We walked for some time, until at length 
we entered the darkest and densest part 
of the forest and came to her house. It was 
a very old looking place : the windows 
were broken in; the door was sagging on its 
hinges; the clapboards were rotting away ; in 
fact, the whole structure looked as if at 
any minute it would fall to pieces. 

The girl asked me in to meet her grand- 
father and grandmother. The old people 
were playing chess and asked me to join 
them in their game. This I did for polite- 
ness' sake. They seemed to be kindly people 
but you could see that they had never been 
outside that section of the country. 

The house consisted Of one big room below 



and I can not say how many above. In 
this one lower room, however, there was 
one big table, five or six chairs and a stove 
— that was all. 

As we sat there playing, the door blew 
open and a tall heavily-built "lumber 
Jack" came in. He spoke to us in a gruff 
voice and sat down in the corner of the 
room. I felt conscious during the whole 
game that he was watching me furtively, 
although every time I looked in his direction, 
he averted his gaze. 

During the evening a terrible storm had 
come up and the thunder seemed almost to 
rock the old house, while the vivid lightning 
seemed at times to turn the dark night 
into day. 

Eleven o'clock came and I got up to 
leave but the old people insisted that I should 
stay, for they said I would be sure to lose 
my way and might run into the river. I 
knew this to be true and so I decided to 
accept their hospitality. 

They showed me to my room at the top 
of the old stair-case. It contained a bed 
and one chair. I do not know why I did 
not undress but I removed only my collar 
and tie and lay down on the bed. 

I must have been there three hours when 
I heard the sound of foot-steps coming up 
the old squeaky stair-case. The sound 
ceased just outside my door. In a few 
minutes more someone else came up. Then 
I heard the voice of the "lumber Jack" say 
quietly, "You grab him while I throw my 
coat over his head." 

In a second I was up on the bed and had 
my coat off. The door opened. A heavy 
man plunged towards my bed. I threw 
my coat over his head, gave him a push 
knocking him against the man behind him. 
Both fell to the floor. 

Like a flash 1 ran down stairs and out of 
the door, not knowing where I was going. 
I could hear the heavy breathing of the 
man in hot pursuit, I knew if I stopped he 



136 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



would be upon me. My knees felt as if 
they would give way. The man was only 
ten feet behind me. Just to the right there 
was a bend in the road. I argued with my- 
self for a second whether I should take the 
turn. I could hear the waters of the Sas- 
katchewan dash against the rocks, I knew 
the river to be very near but turn I did. 
My foot slipped and — I awoke. 

— C. Smith. 



"THE OLD BOY 

It was one beautiful day in late summer 
that I found myself with my brother and 
Jack Beach speeding along a country road 
some distance from home. We were in a 
beautiful wooded part of the country, when we 
had the misfortune to have a "blow-out." 
Considering who were working, I knew 
it would be a good half hour before we could 
go on, so I started along the road in search 
of flowers and berries. I found a lot of 
both and also something else that I was 
not looking for. 

Not such a great way down the road I 
saw, growing among some big rocks, a 
beautiful blue flower such as I had never 
seen before. I went forward to get it and 
was about to pick it when I suddenly 
thought that I would like to have the plant 
for my garden. I knelt down and pushed 
aside the large stone which I thought covered 
the roots. I was just about to lift the plant 
when I was aware that something just a 
little below my arm was moving. At first 
I thought that the heat had perhaps made 
me a little dizzy, and so I closed my eyes 
thinking that the dizziness would pass. 
Upon opening my eyes I realized that I 
was not dizzy because directly underneath 
my hand lay a huge "rattler!" Very much 
disturbed he was, too, because I had aroused 
him from his afternoon nap! 

Well, to make a long story short, I didn't 
stop to make apologies. I backed away, 
my eyes watching him all the time. Suddenly 
he sprang into "coil". His head swayed 



to and fro — and then — he rattled. I reached 
the road, turned and sped down it toward 
the machine and the boys. When I at last 
reached them, all I could say was, "There's 
a rattler — down there!" Then things went 
black and when I became conscious again 
I was home. 

The boys took a revolver and went back 
to the woods to see if they could find the 
rattler. Later they returned with him, 
having found him lying in the sun near 
the blue flower. You doubt my story and 
think I must be having another dizzy spell? 
Well, then, come home with me and I will 
introduce you to "The Old Boy" as we 
call him. 

— Onalee Lang. 



M. M. G. 

To my Valentine: 

Sweet lady mine, 

Inspirer of all thoughts divine 

I love you true, 

Indeed I do! 

And all my thoughts are thoughts of you. 

Say you'll be mine. 

Sweet Valentine, 

And I will never more repine. 



There are strange "crushes" at Lasell 

Of whom I have a tale to tell 

There are crushes small, and crushes tal 

They are most humorous all in all. 

I really dare not mention names 

Of all those loving, love-sick dames. 

They guard each other safe from harm 

Along the campus arm in arm. 

When we discover one, the pair 

Is sure to disappear for fair. 

'Tis passing strange I'd have you know 

Why crushes love each other so. 





HAMPTON QUARTETTE 

On the evening of February second, we 
were carried in spirit most pleasantly to the 
sunny southland by some of the songs of 
the Hampton Quartette. Mr. Kidder in- 
creased our interest by the clear stereop- 
ticon views of the trip from New York to 
Hampton, of the Hampton buildings, of the 
work done at the school, and of some negroes, 
such as Booker T. Washington, who though 
unpromising in youth, had used Hampton 
as a stepping-stone to worthy manhood. 
We were touched both by the singers and by 
the speaker's plea for help in behalf of the 
colored race. 



a very pleasant effect. Supper was served 
in an ideal manner by several members of the 
Senior Class dressed in Japanese costume. 
Between courses the girls danced. The music 
was furnished by Nell Woodward, Martha 
Schuman, Vilette Peck, Ida Laubenstein, and 
Katherine Hoag. Later in the evening 
several selections, sung but Helen Benson were 
enjoyed very much by those present. 



On Saturday January 16th a charming 
"Tango Tea" was given at Senior House in 
honor of the Sophomores. The house was 
artistically decorated with lattice work of 
wisteria, and with Japanese lanterns making 



On February 5th, one of the most im- 
portant events of the present year took 
place. At one o'clock the Seniors headed 
by their honorary member, Mr. Robert Elliot 
Speer and the Class President, Nell Wood- 
ward, marched into the chapel wearing for 
the first time their caps and gowns. The 
Juniors seeing the Seniors coming formed in 
lines to the door. "All honor to '15. They 
were most fortunate in having their Honorary 
Member with them on this occasion. 



138 



LASELL LEAVES 



Mr. Landone, in his lecture before the 
school, not only pictured vividly to our 
minds the terrible sufferings and needs cf 
the warring countries, but also aroused an 
interest among the students that seems to 
be steadily increasing. Almost immediately, 
a committee was appointed to take charge 
of the work and to make systematic ar- 
rangements for what we were all planning 
to do. The morning following Mr. Lan- 
done's address, the president of the student 



girls for the benefit of the war fund, groups 
of girls and teachers have arranged for 
and have given many original and novel 
entertainments for the same cause. Sat- 
urday evening, February sixth, some of the 
girls held a water carnival, which was thor- 
oughly enjoyed by all who were there, de- 
spite the fact that the participants seemed 
to take a special delight in splashing the on- 
lookers as much as possible. The dimes 
were cheerfully dropped into the box and 




TABLEAUX OF PEACE 



council gave a short talk concerning the 
relief work, after which a slip of paper was 
passed to each girl who pledged whatever 
she could, either in money or services for 
the relief of the sufferers. More than two 
hundred dollars was pledged and many 
of the girls have volunteered their leisure 
time for the preparing of pads and band- 
ages to be made from the old clothes col- 
lected throughout the school. 

Aside from the hair-dressing, shoe shining, 
and manicure parlors established by the 



no one was heard to cay that she wished 
that she had her dime back again. 

The same evening, February sixth, about 
forty girls, all armed with scissors and a 
will to do their part, met in the sewing room. 
Here Dr. Morgenthaler skilfully directed 
them in the cutting and folding of bandages 
and pads of various sizes. The evening passed 
quickly since, mingled with the sport they 
had, was the knowledge that they were 
doing a work which would save the lives of 
men who are dying because of the lack of 
just these simple dressings. 



\x 



LASELL LEAVES 



139 



The girls of the studio were not to be 
outdone and so, with Miss Mulliken's help, 
a series of tableaux, songs, dances, and music 
was arranged for Wednesday evening, Feb- 
ruary tenth, in the gymnasium. Scenes 
showing the conditions in and near the war 
zones were cleverly staged and the charac- 
ters appropriately costumed. After the 
program, ice cream and frozen pud- 
ding were sold by those of the actors who 
were in ancient Greek attire. Of course, 
the refreshments were "extra" but an an- 
nouncement beforehand, made this fact 
known with the pleasing result that almost 
fifty dollars was realized from the evening's 
program. 

The program of the evening _was as 
follows: — 

History — Lucile Grazier. 

Dance of the Wild Rose — Jacquelin Bick- 
ford. 

French Songs — Mile. Louise Le Royer. 

Poland — Hala Zach. 

Field Hospital. Refugees. Peace. 




JUNIOR-SENIOR PARTY 

We wonder whether a party was ever so 
keenly enjoyed as the cabaret of 1916 given 
in honor of 1915 on January 23. The stage 
was tastefully decorated with palms while on 
the floor were the tables, occupied by four 
couples. Waitresses and a waiter convinced 
one that life was one continuous bed of ease, 
and the "Me-an-u" made one's mouth fairly 
water. Dorice Lord, Grace Farley, Ruth 
Harris, Laura Hale, Ann Cornwall, and Peggy 
Bradley welcomed the guests with an original 
song to the tune of China-town. Dorothy 
Brate and "Mid" Cloake brought forth much 
applause with their "Abba Dabba" selection, 
rendered half-sitting, half standing. Ann 
Cornwall sang, "Back to Carolina." Gladys 
Frauenthal and Gertrude Dana sang as they 
danced, "Prunella Come Out." Marion New- 
land made an ideal man, when backed by her 
attractive company, she sang, "Poor Pauline," 
Grace Farley as Mr. Vernon Castle and 
Eleanor McCarty as Mrs. Castle demon- 
strated the latest dances, after which we all 
were requested to dance, a prize being con- 
ferred on Marion Newland and Veda Ferguson 
as our best dancers. We shall cherish long 
the memory of this evening spent with the 
Juniors. We wish all the girls might have 
shared the following "Me-an-u." 

Supe 
P. K. Review of Reviews Faculty Bean 

Fish 
Lasell-New-burg Class Clams 

Relishes 

Rare-dishes 
Jolly Juniors Jelly 
Meat 

Radcliffe game 
Shezaduc 
Castle's Lame Due 
Vegetables 

Gardner's turn-up 
Salads 

Let us knit with Red Cross Beans 
Kieth's mixture with G. M. dressing down 
Lasell Leaves with staff of life 
Desserts 
Fletcher ice Lemon squeeze in 70 

Soph Drinks 

Lecture sham-pain Try-to-be-cordial 

Senior-dig ni-tea Be-cider (for men only) 

Lasell Spirit 

Safe-tea 



Senior eggs 



H odder-coal 

Indoor meet 



Freshman greens 



HALA ZACH 



140 



LASELL LEAVES 



While the Juniors were eabaretin, 

Tis likely you've forgotten us. 

But Seniors, just you remember 

We're not troubled with Wanderlust. 

Our minds on one object are centered, 

With a feeling both steady and true — 

That object is awfully worthy 

The same object — being you!! 

A dear old "Goodnight" to you Seniors, 

With the pleasantest possible dreams 

Is the wish of your Sisters of '17 

All mixed up with good chocolate creams. 



the Special Class to take the place of Ruth 
Anderson, who has left school. 



SENIOR SPECIAL RECEPTION 

On the evening of February 4th the Specials 
entertained the Seniors and the school at a 
reading by Mrs. Ellen Pooler Rice entitled 
"Miss Hobbs." The Gymnasium was deco- 
rated with palms and ferns and the senior 
special banners. The old girls who heard 
Mrs. Rice read "Cousin Kate" last winter 
were especially glad to hear her again and the 
new T girls are more than ever looking for- 
ward to another reading in the near future. 
After the reading the Specials held a recep- 
tion in the parlor for the Seniors and Faculty. 
The entire evening was greatly enjoyed by 
all. 



On Friday, February fifth, Robert Elliot 
Speer of New York, came to speak to us 
in Chapel. Through the kindness of the 
Dean of the Boston Theological Seminary 
this treat was made possible for, originally 
only Mr. Speer planned for the meeting in 
Boston. 

Any words we might say of Dr. Speer's 
talk would be inadequate, but the whole 
school joins the Seniors in feeling, that 
his presence was as much of an inspiration 
as was his message on thinking nobly and 
on lifting high the name we bear. 



During the month of January there have 
been several class recitals given by the 
pupils of Misses Parkhurst, Hall, Jepperson 
Goodrich and Professor Hills. These recitals 
are enjoyed very much and are of great 
benefit to the pupils. 

Onalee Lang has been elected Secretary of 



On the afternoon of January 29, from 
five to six o'clock, Miss Parkhurst gave an 
informal tea to pupils and friends. During 
the enjoyable hour, piano selections were 
played by Miss Merveille Gratz, Miss Gladys 
Wilkes, and Miss Pauline Ray. 

January 28, at the usual afternoon 
lecture period, Mr. Landone spoke to us 
on, "Conditions in France Resulting from 
the War". His talk was intensely interest- 
ing and aroused our sympathies anew. 

Thursday, January 21, an interesting 
lecture on Bacteriology was given by Mrs. 
Loomis. 

Two new basket ball songs have been 
given in, in the last month, the words and 
music of both being original. One Nellie 
Woodward wrote: 



LA 



SELL! 



"Girls are you ready 
To go into the game. 
For we all look to you 
To back up Lasell in her fame. 
Everyone do your best, 
When the game begins 
For, L-a-s-e-double 1 Lasell sure must win!" 

To a catchy tune which is sure to spur our team, 
to its utmost efforts. 

The other came from '16, no individual 
name given. The words are: 

Now girls begin the game with a will 

Keep up the fight. 

We'll back you up throughout the game 

With all our might. 

Be sure and do your very best 

For dear Lasell. 

We wish you luck and all success 

So play right well. 

They are written to another catchy mel- 
ody. We should like to know the com- 
poser who with Nell deserves great credit. 
We hope their example will be followed by 
more girls. 

February 12, Friday morning, bright 
and early, the jolliest possible party of nearly 
fifty girls, chaperoned by Miss Warner, 
left Auburndale for the annual week end 
trip to the White Mountains. We surely 



LASELL LEAVES 



141 



wish them the best time possible. The party 

included : — 

Irene Apfelbaum 

Marguerite Belt 

Ruth Boehner 

Eloise Bordages 

Dorothy Brate 

Helen Brooks 

Ruth Burnap 

Mary Canfield 

Anna Cornwall 

Dorothy Crane 

Gertrude Dana 

Katherine Dearborn 

Elsie Doleman 

Edna Edwards 

Florence Evans 

Lavinia Fera 

Gladys Frauenthal 

Adolphia Garnsey 

Florence Gates 

Cornelia Gaty 

Naomi Greenwood 

Marion Griffin 

Frances Harris 

Phoebe Haskell 



Lena Hauck 
Dorothy Hartshorn '14 
Maud Hayden 
Margaret Jones 
Marie Kolb 
Gertrude Korn 
Viola Krueger 
Ida Laubenstein 
Marion Lerch 
Dorothy Mathias 
Olive Margolis 
Bernice Marx 
Mary Frances Moore 
Helen Overholser 
Evalina Perkins 
Pauline Ray 
Carol Rice 
Helen Schooley 
Beatrice Shuttleworth 
Alma Sweet 
Margaret Trice 
Ruth Webb 
Anna Wood 
Nell Woodward 



Nellie Woodward, senior president en- 
joyed the White Mountain trip as a com- 
mencement gift from the Junior Class. 



The Senior conversation class held its first 
session Monday, January eleventh with the 
class president Nellie Woodward as hostess. 
The topic was "The Ideal Hostess." Mon- 
day January eighteenth the class held 
an amimated and enjoyable discussion upon 
the subject "Localisms." Irene Apfelbaum 
acted as hostess. Evelyn Schmidt and Lucile 
Scott, Lasell '14 were the guests of the even- 
ing. "Music and Musicians" occupied the 
class on Monday, January 25th and several 
interesting sketches of composers were given. 
Miss Benson sang ' Just a Wearying for You" 
and Miss Wilkes played a selection of Mac- 
Dowell's. We were happy to have Evelyn 
Dunham's mother as our guest. Katherine 



Bingaman presided. Thursday, February 
11th, the conversation class took for its 
topic "Great Personalities." Gladys Wilkes 
poured and Dorothy Hartshorn, '14 was the 
guest of the evening. 



FRENCH TEA 

Among the pleasant social affairs held 
during January was the French tea given 
by Mile. Le Royer for the advanced 
French students. Everyone tried to take ad- 
vantage of the opportunity to speak French. 
The presence of several outside guests, friends 
of Madamoiselle, added greatly to the suc- 
cess of the tea. Refreshments were served in 
the form of tea and crackers. 



Thanks to a heavy snow fall, on January 
26, the Seniors and their guests enjoyed a 
sleigh ride to Wellesley. 





CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR NOTES 

January 19, the topic discussed was "Friend- 
ship", with Margaret King as leader. Many 
helpful thoughts were expressed, the most 
comforting being, "The greatest friend we 
can ever have is Jesus Christ." 

Marie Klenze, '14 led Christian Endeavor 
prayer meeting, January 26. The keynote 
of her message may be sounded by this 
quotation: "As a man thinketh in his 
heart, so is he". 

February 2, Phoebe Haskell of the Sopho- 
more Class led in the discussion of the sub- 
ject "Truth." The oft repeated quotation 
beginning "To thine own self be true" 
will no doubt mean more to those present 
than ever before. 

The prayer meeting on February 9 was 
lead by Miss Raymond. In her splendid 
talk she brought out the following as quali- 
ties we must possess if we would have eternal 
youth: playfulness (to be able to play as 
well as work) ; ambition (for fame, success, 
to attain certain ideals in character) ; 
generosity (giving of one's self for larger 
service) ; piety (reverence not only for 
God, but for all that is noble and fine in 
nature) . 



Sunday evening, January 24, Lasell girls, 
guests of the First Congregational Church 
at Vesper service listened to the life story 
of Mr. Darius Cobb told by the famous 
artist himself. His widely known painting 
of the head of Christ called "The Master" 
was exhibited. As we listened to the words 
of the venerable man explaining how 
he came to accomplish such a work, we 
could but marvel at the beauty of the painted 
face which looks out from the canvas with 
a searching, penetrating expression. Truly, 
the many years of Mr. Cobb's strong and 
unwavering purpose to paint a worthy 
picture of the Christ have not been in vain. 



Reverend E. J. Muste of Newtonville, 
on the 31st of January, urged the nec- 
essity of our assuming the "I am debtor" 
attitude, the attitude that makes us feel 
that we give the world an honest day's 
work rather than that "the world owes us 
a living." 

February the 7th, Dr. Butters told the 
need of the world for appreciative women, 
women who will take an interest in individ- 
uals. If the world needs such women we 
ought to be in training now. 



EDITORIAL 




'/// /a 



/ 




1 










V 



February, the shortest month of our year, 
contains the birthdays of the two greatest 
Americans, George Washington, the Father 
of our Country, and Abraham Lincoln, the 
Savior of our Country. The United States 
owes to these men the debt of gratitude 
for laying the foundation of a nation that 
now, in the midst of war and strife, is honored 
and respected by all countries, a nation that 
has so conducted itself and its affairs as to 
maintain peaceful relations with the entire 
world. 

Not only do we remember these men for 
what they have done for our country, but 
their strong personalities can not but awaken 
admiration in everyone, whether American 
or not. In all his greatness who could be more 
human, more tender, just, and self-forgetful 
than Abraham Lincoln. We all love the 
stories that are told of his treatment of the 
soldiers, of his love of family, and devo- 
tion to the nation. Both these heroes seemed 
to have followed the motto, "Do the thing 
that counts, and then don't count it." 



outside world. We are all proud of the way 
in which she has answered this call to give 
aid to a worthy cause and has taken her 
place with the other schools and colleges 
of the land in helping to relieve some of the 
suffering of the present war victims. The 
utmost we can do is only the slightest frac- 
tion of what we would like to do, of what we 
know must be done if adequate help is to 
be given to those who are suffering for a 
cause which they consider right and just. 
We want to thank the girls for the many 
ways in which they have shown their interest 
in this movement and we hope the work 
may continue. 



Lasell has again had the chance to show 
her unselfishness and her interest in the 



MARTHA WASHINGTON 

Down cold snow-stretches of our bitter time, 

When windy shams and the rain mocking sleet 
Of Trade have cased us in such icy rime 

That hearts are scarcely hot enough to beat. 
Thy fame, O Lady of the lofty eyes, 

Doth fall along the age, like as a lane 
Of Spring, in whose most generous boundaries 

Full many a frozen virtue warms again. 
Today I saw the pale much burdened form 

Of Charity come limping o'er the line, 
And straighten from the bending of the storm 

And flush with stirrings of new strength divine. 
Such influence and sweet gracious impulse came 

( )ul of the beams of thine immortal name! 

— Lanier. 







History repeats itself and one of the most 
delightful chapters is always the account of 
the "latest weddings." Among these happy 
recent brides and grooms are the following : 

Jennie Grier Stanton became Mrs. George 
Clifton Maull on Tuesday, January 5th, at 
Wilmington, Del. 

On Wednesday, the 27th of January, oc- 
curred the marriage of Ina M. McLean, '10 
to Mr. Sherman Hunt at St. Augustine, 
Fla. 

On Saturday, February 13th, Margaret 
May Fuller, '06 became Mrs. Harold Jackson 
Manchester at Pawtucket, R. I. Wednesdays 
in May, Mr. and Mrs. Manchester will be 
at home at 53 Columbia Ave., Edgewood, 
R. I. 

Edna Mathias, '13 and Mr. Eugene Augus- 
tus Dinet married on Wednesday, February 
3rd, at Joliet, 111. Mr. and Mrs. Dinet will 
be at home after May 1st at 506 Prairie Ave., 
Joliet. 

On Tuesday, February 16th, occurred the 
marriage of Katherine Norris to Mr. Fred 
D. Coambs at Chicago, 111. 

Bon voyage to these brides and grooms! 



Isabel Blackstock Beardsley, '03 and her 
husband have been doubly blessed in the 
coming into their home of a son and daughter, 
little Ailing Prudden, Jr., and Carolyn Ailing, 
born January 7th. Miss Clementina Butler 
declares that these little babies are a wonder 
and that Isabel and her sister, Constance '09, 
are as dear and charming as ever. Miss 
Butler has recently been giving missionary 
talks in Derby. 

Miriam Nelson Flanders, '05 declares that 
Charles Ruston Flanders, born December 
8th, is a fine healthy baby, and we must take 
her word for it as she is Master Charles' fond 
mother. We rejoice with Miriam and her 
husband over this almost-Christmas-gift. 

Edna MacDonald Sheppard's, '11 little son 
is no longer one of the "no name series". 
We have just learned his name: William 
Bernard Sheppard. 

In a recent letter from Lucy Aldrich Bers- 
ton, TO, she speaks of her loyalty to Lasell 
and of her home activities, but the best part 
of her letter is the closing paragraph in which 
she says that "From a cradle nearby comes a 
tiny wail which means that my litt e daugh- 



LASELL LEAVES 



145 



ter, Elizabeth born on January 13, is send- 
ing her greetings to the friends at Lasell." 
Our most loving congratulations to these 
favored parents. 

Among the interesting and recent announce- 
ments is that of the engagement of Josephine 
Siggins of West Hickory, Pa., to Dr. Henry E. 
Utter of Providence, R. I. Josephine is one 
of our dear girls of 1909-10 and Doctor Utter 
is the brother of our Mary Starr Utter, '12. 

Ida Leona Beane of our senior class re- 
cently announced her engagement to Mr. 
Esmond Sargent Rice of Waban, Mass. We 
are glad that Ida is not to be taken away from 
our neighborhood. We are sincerely re- 
joicing with these happy young folk. 

Among our recent guests at Lasell was Mil- 
dred Snyder, '10 who came on to attend the 
mid -winter "home gathering." She had been 
spending some time in Connecticut with her 
father who is just convalescing from a serious 
illness. Mildred looks well and is happy, 
was graduated from her state university 
last spring — was president of the student 
council there — and is thinking of taking up 
post-graduate work, which does not surprise 
us in our scholarly and rightfully ambitious 
Mildred! 

Another guest at this gathering was Julia 
ter Kuile, '10, president of the New York 
Lasell Club. She, too, had a good report. 
Julia has "kept up" her music and Miss 
Potter spoke of her fine playing at the recent 
annual meeting of the New York Club. 

Elizabeth Hazelet is the guest of her aunt, 
Mrs. Minnie Ransom Wagner, and Lasell 
is happy to have her again "one of 
us." 

f Among the interesting bits of Lasell news 
which Miss Potter brought back from the 
New York Lasell Club meeting was the 
word that Ruth Decker, daughter of Edith 
Lasell Decker, is now a successful teacher 
of the Montessori method in New York 
City. Ruth is working hard but looks 
as young and seems as carefree as when a 
schoolgirl at Lasell. 



Delightful music was furnished at this 
meeting by Frances Barbour Sonntag '89. 

Miss Potte- has no end of interesting in- 
cidents to relate concerning her delightful 
meeting with "old girls" at this annual 
gathering of the New York meeting, but 
believes our registrar is saving up the full 
account for the March number of theLeaves. 

Marriott Degen MacDonald sends her 
yearly subscription for the Leaves and 
the glad assurance to us — that her little Helen 
may some day actually be a Lasell girl. We 
are grateful for messages of this kind. 

Irene Bollman, '14 does not surprise us 
when in her letter to Doctor Winslow she 
declares that she is quite as busy out of 
school as she was in. "Forward" was always 
her motto here and we expect her to "keep 
n" with the progressives always. She 
speaks of a visit with Mildred Cutting, '14 
and the "two of them" finished up their 
visit at Josephine Kenower's, '13. Irene 
and her parents are spending the remainder 
of the winter in California but she hopes 
to be back at Lasell in time for the June 
reunion. 

Doctor Bragdon was kind enough to share 
with us the charming Christmas greeting 
which came to him from Louise Luquiens 
Judd. The message was written from Port- 
land, Ore., but Louise wrote of their leaving 
soon for Honolulu where her husband is to be 
the Forester of Hawaii. We are glad to 
hear from this old Lasell girl, whose father, 
afterward a professor at Yale College, was 
for many years instructor of French at Lasell. 

A charming note came recently from 
Marion Ordway, '11, but we were sorry 
for the news it contained of the illness of 
Marion Briggs and we are thankful to know 
that she is convalescing. Marion Ordway 
is still enjoying her fine position in the 
postal service at Orleans, Vt. 

Alma Bunch, '13 tells of a musical course 
which she is taking. She has been help- 
ing this last year in a course in domes- 
tic science given for the poor children in a 



146 



LASELL LEAVES 



settlement house in the stock yards of 
Chicago. Pam Spargo, '12 visited her in 
September. 

Emily Butterworth '12 writes of her plan 
of taking a two years' course in kindergarten 
training at Teachers' College in Indiana- 
polis. 

Though now a busy married woman, May 
Florine Thielens Peeples finds time for some 
good work outside of her immedicate home. 
A recent Chicago paper gives an account of a 
musical pageant in which May Florine took 
an active part and was assisted by her sister, 
Bessie Louise Thielens Miller. 

Clara Nims, '07 recently sent us a kind 
message and we were delighted to hear from 
her. She has been supplying successfully 
in the library at her home town, Watertown, 
N. Y. We wish her all success in her busy 
life and also wish that we could see her 
oftener at Lasell. 

Our preceptress was delighted to receive 
a short time ago a message from Alice Ma- 
goun, '78. Alice was for some time head of 
the high school at Amherst but is now a 
busy teacher in the public schools of Bath, 
Me. We hope soon to see her at Lasell. 

Another dear "old girl" to return at the 
mid-winter gathering was Minnie Strickland 
Whitney. Minnie has spent much of her 
life in residence in France and travel in the 
Old World but none of these things have 
spoiled her. She is the same gracious friend 
as of old. 

No "old girl" will ever be more welcome 
at Lasell than Angeline Emery '14, who 
recently paid us a flying visit accompanied 
by her classmate, Mildred Smith, '14. It 
did seem goood to see her looking so per- 
fectly well but we would have been happier 
if we could have kept both these girls longer. 

Miss Potter is thinking seriously of taking 
a party of Lasell girls to California for the 
two expositions and a trip through the 
West, shortly after the close of school. We 
hope that a more definite notice will appear 
later. 



One of the best press notices Lasell has 
had of her winter sports came from the pen 
of our Miss Dorothy Shank's sister and 
appeared in a recent number of a Williams- 
port, Pa., daily paper. 

Margaret Clark Marden and her mother, 
Mrs. William Clark, were recently guests 
at Lasell. We were glad to see Margaret 
again but were sorry that the serious illness 
of her sister, Louise, was the cause of her 
coming. We are thankful to report Louise 
is now rapidly convalescing. 

We continue to receive good news from 
Carrie Kendig Kellogg, '79 who is spending 
a happy winter in Aiken, South Carolina. 
Elizabeth Frost is with her. 

In a most interesting letter from Charlotte 
Swartwout, '14 we learn that she is, although 
out of school, by no means out of work. 
She is very busy in church and musical cir- 
cles and is even planning to take up further 
duties later on. Just what we expected from 
Charlotte! She closes her letter with "I 
would like to see all the friends at Lasell, 
especially Doctor Winslow. How much the 
"old girls" owe him for his unfailing kind- 
ness and help!" 



DIARY— FEB. 6—10.00 P. M. 

Oh, Diary, I had the most wonderful 
time to-day! And last night when I heard the 
rain beating against the window, I thought, 
"I do hope it's nice to-morrow!" But it's 
"always fair weather when Lasell Girls get 
together," so it really would have made no 
difference with our fun had it rained. You 
wonder what big occasion this was? Why, 
the New York Lasell Club luncheon, of 
course. 

I could just hardly wait till 12.30 to hurry 
to the Hotel Majestic, and see how many 
old friends I might find. And such exclama- 
tions, and shrieks, and demonstrations of 
affection ensued, when we discovered unex- 
pected classmates in the dressing-room. We 
talked for some time, and it did seem good 
to see old friends, and to meet former Lasell 



LASELL LEAVES 



147 



girls. About two o'clock we wended our 
way into the beautiful dining-room. Now, 
I've heard people say, that in great excite- 
ment, one does not know what he eats. 
I certainly was excited, but I am sure I can 
give the wonderful menu to which we were 
served. Grape-fruit; celery; casserolettes 
of sweet-breads; larded fillet of beef; mush- 
room sauce; luxor salad; frozen fancy 
forms; cakes; coffee. 

After the luncheon, a short business 
meeting was held, and then we enjoyed 
several very lovely vocal selections from 
Mrs. F. B. Sontag— '89. 

And, Diary, Miss Potter was there! Oh, 
it seemed so good to see her again! She 
brought us postals of Lasell, greetings from 
Dr. Winslow. She told us all about our 
Alma Mater, our Faculty and brought sever- 
al photographs of Dr. and Mrs. Winslow 
and family. She did make us so homesick 
for Lasell, and we wanted to take the very 
first train for Auburndale. 

The singing of our "Alma Mater" brought 
this happy reunion to a close. Already we 
are planning on a similar one a year from 
now. I must record the names of those 
who attended the luncheon, so when I forget 
who they are, Diary, you must prompt me: 

Julia M. ter Kuile, '10, Montvale, N. J.; 
Gladys Stults, '09-10, Morristown, N. J.; 
Lillie R. Potter, '80, Auburndale, Mass.; 
Juliette Beach, '13, New Milford, Conn.; 
Ruth Decker, '12-'13, Orange, N. J.; Julia A. 
DeWitt, '10 (Mrs. James P. Read), Newark, 
N. J.; Hannah Proctor, '10 (Mrs. R. O. 
Bonner), Rockville Centre, N. Y.; Anna 
L. Conant, '09, Plainfield, N. J.; Louise W. 
Morrell, '08, Passa'c, N. J. ; Florence Swart- 
wout, '09, Port Jervis, N. Y. ; Sally A. Moore, 
'08, New York City; Mercy Sinsabaugh, '87 
Mrs. Owen Ingalls, New York City) ; 
Winifred Adams, '88 (Mrs. H. H. Hamilton), 
Bridgeport, Conn.; Fanny Barbour, '89 (Mrs. 
F. B. Sonntag) , New York City; Elizabeth 
Harwood, '89 (Mrs. Alfred C. Fones) , Bridge 
port, Conn.; Josephine Bogart, '89, Toronto, 



Canada; Susan Hallock, '88 (Mrs. W. P. 
Couch), Cromwell, Conn.; Maudie L. Stone, 
'88, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Annie M. Gwinnell, 
'88, Newark, N. J.; M. Alice Fuller, '95, 
New York City; Eva Ferris, '95 (Mrs. George 
Foote) , So. Norwalk, Conn.; Mabel Case, '94 
(Mrs. J. N. Viot), S. Manchester, Conn. 
Grace Huntington, '89, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Griselda Downs, '13-14, Orange, N. J. 
Lena Vee Kelley, '14, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Charlotte Swartwout, '14, Port Jervis, N. Y. 
Marion Keefer, '14, Mechanicsville, N. Y. 
Gratia de Zouche, '14, Troy, N. Y.; Hannah 
Bingaman, '14, Plainfield, N. J.; Hazel 
D. North, '01 (Mrs. J. Elgar) , White Plains, 
N. Y.; Edith Hawley, '01 (Mrs. N. P. Dunn), 
Albany, N. Y. ; Laura Simons, '01, New 
Haven, Conn.; Edith Harris, '01 (Mrs. 
W. H. Seward), New Hampton, N. Y.; 
Virgin'a Takler, '01 (Mrs. Arthur Boom- 
hower) , Great Neck, L. I.; Tryphena 
Ulrick (Mrs. Ralph Ludwig) , Allentown, Pa. 



ON THE LIFE MASK OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN 

This bronze doth keep the very form and mold 

Of our great martyr's face. Yes, this is he: 
That brow all wisdom, all benignity; 

That human, humorous mouth; those cheeks that 
hold 
Like some harsh landscape all the summer's gold; 

That spirit fit for sorrow, as the sea 
For storms to beat on; the lone agony 

Those silent, patient lips too well foretold. 
Yes, this is he who ruled a world of men 

As might some prophet of the older day — 
Brooding above the tempest and the fray 

With deep-eyed thought and more than mortal ken. 

A power was his beyond the touch of art 

In armed strength — his pure and mighty heart. 

— Gilder. 





Lasell Leaves acknowledges with thanks the 
receipt of the following January magazines: 

The Centralian, The Artisan, The Lotus, 
The B. H. S. Taller, The Electron, The Orange 
and Green, The X-Ray, The Optimist, The 
Student, The Rumbler, The Budget, The H. S. 
Review, The Maroon and White, The Elgin 
IT. S. Mirror, The Academian. New Trier 
Echoes, The Rail Splitter, The Nautilus, The 
Lion, Aegis, Boston University Beacon, The 
Sagamore, The Hermonite, The Alpha, The 
Archon, N. H. S. Review, The Golden Rod, 
The Advance, Somerville H. S. Radiator, The 
Recorder, Reflector, The Gleam, William Wood's 
College Record, The Goldenrod, The Netvs, 
Vail-Deane Budget, The Oracle The Tiger, 
The Acropolis, The Folio, Shucis, The Aca- 
demic Observer, The Observer, The Ramble, 
The Hillbilly, Sharps, and Flats, University 
School News, The Mirror The Owl, The Iris, 



The Shamokin H. S. Review, The Scroll, The 
Raduorite, The Columbian, The Comet, Daeda- 
lian Monthly, The Missile, Pasco School Netvs. 



LOST AND FOUND 

Found — A fine magazine in The Electron, 
especially for a first issue. We wish you all 
success in your new venture. 

Lost — A table of contents. Finder please 
return to The Hermonite. 

Found — A great improvement in The Rad- 
uorite of January over that of last year. The 
artistic department headings add much to 
the attractiveness of your magazine. 

Lost, Strayed, or Stolen — An exchange de- 
partment. Finder please return to The 
Student, Burr and Burton Seminary, Man- 
cester, Vt. 

Found — The best kind of a story, "The 
Columbia Man," in The Acropolis. 



LASELL LEAVES 



149 



Wyndonian — One of our many applicants 
for a place in our new department. Lost- 
all our cuts! "The Other Side of the Hill," 
is a very good story. 

Student — Ditto to the first part of the 
Wyndonian, otherwise you have a nice little 
paper. 

Sassamon — Ditto to the Studentl Your 
January cover is very good. 

Recorder — The article entitled "The Cam- 
era" is very interesting. 

Daedalion — Your magazine is interesting 
but you, too, lack cuts! 

The Owl — Your Exchange cut is very good. 

Hermonite—-"A Letter from a Mischie- 
vous Boy to his Absent Chum" is surely 
designed to make its readers laugh! 

Golden Rod — Also — Lost cuts! Otherwise 
a good paper. 

Orange — A very pleasing paper. 



AS IN A LOOKING GLASS 

Lasell Leaves — Yours is one of the best 
papers we have received this year. Your 
locals are very interesting and your cuts are 
fine. Your exchange column is the best we 
have seen in our exchanges. — Drury Academe. 

Lasell Leaves — A well arranged magazine 
with an exceptionally good supplement and 
intelligent exchange. But do not permit your 
leaves to grow too dry. Why not a few more 
jokes? — Sharps and Flats. 

Lasell Leaves — We are delighted to receive 
your most excellent exchange, which is about 
the most complete on our list. Your paper is 
certainly well-organized and does credit to 
your school. — The Comet. 

We look forward to exchange with Lasell 
Leaves with pleasure. It is interesting from 
beginning to end, and especially do we men- 
tion the literary department. The cuts 
greatly increase this interest. The author 
of the poems "The Voice of the Wind" and 
"Thanksgiving Day" deserves much praise.— 
The Electron. 

Lasell Leaves is one of the best magazines 
on our Exchange list. The cover design is 



attractive, and the cuts and pictures are 
interesting. The locals are interesting, and 
the "Trip to Historic Charlestown" makes 
us all want to have the same experience.— 
William Wood's College Record. 

Lasell Leaves — The arrangement of your 
paper is excellent, and every department is 
interesting. — The Aegis. 

Lasell Leaves has a grand literary depart- 
ment in its Thanksgiving issue. The cuts 
are good, too. — The Maroon and White. 

Lasell Leaves — Your paper is very interest- 
ing, and the photographs add much to it.— 
Vail-Deane Budget. 

Lasell Leaves — Your paper is by far the 
best we have received. The cuts add much 
to its appearance. — The Classmate. 

The Lasell Leaves is a magazine that we 
are indeed glad to have on our exchange list. 
The attractive covers and cuts add greatly — 
The Hieh School Banner. 




150 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



SEW IT SEEMS 

'When does a man become a seamstress?" 

'When he hems and haws?" 

'No." 

'When he threads his way?" 

'No." 

'When he rips and tears?" 

'No." 

'Give it up." 

'Never, if he can help it." — Ex. 



AS EVER 

"Since the war began the women have 
been taking the places of the men on the 
Paris street-cars." 

"Well, they'd do it here, but the men 
are too ill-mannered to get up." — Ex. 



RETAILED GLORY 

"Mother wants apenn'orth of glory di- 
vine." 

"We don't keep that," said the chemist. 

"Oh, yes, you do," the little maid re- 
torted. "We've got it here before. Mother 
puts it down the drain in the back yard." 

Then the chemist knew that the "glory 
divine" was another way of saying chloride 
of lime. — Ex. 



EASILY DISTINGUISHED 

Young Hibbard was exhibiting his pic- 
ture to a charming girl. 

"This one," he said, handing her a pic- 
ture, "is my photograph, taken with two 
French poodles. Can you recognize me?" 

"Why, yes, certainly," she replied, look- 
ing at it intently. "You are the one with 
the hat on." — Ex. 



GENERALLY AMUSING 

Would-be-contributor — Do you print seri- 
ous poetry by amateurs? 

Editor — Only in our humorous column. 
— Ex. 




r 



■■% 



Discount to College Girls 

Why pay $4 and $5 for your shoes and slippers when 
you can buy the same quality, style and finish for 
$2, $2.50 and $2.75. Try us and be convinced. 




SATIN EVENING SLIPPER 

in all colors to harmonize with every costume. Silk 
stockings to match at 45 cents the pair. You cannot 
equal these these prices elsewhere and with our goods. 

WEBER'S SAMPLE SHOE OUTLET 

564 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON 

UP ONE FLIGHT OPP. ADAM HOUSE 



J 



LASELL LEAVES 



151 



LASELL STUDENTS 

Will Make No Mistakes 
In Depending Upon 

New England's 
Greatest Store 

FOR THEIR VARIOUS NEEDS 



Here one may choose from 

unequaled assortments of 

Clothing Furnishing Rugs Pictures 

Artwares Trunks and Luggage 

and the many other things so frequently 
needed during college days 



Best of all, selection here is never from 
commonplace stock but from the best that 
Europe and America can produce 



Jordan Marsh Company 



BOSTON 



J?eto Spring ^atg 

Dress Hats Garden Hats 
Turbans 1820 Pokes 

Close Hats Matinee Hats 

Plumed Hats Semi-Dress Hats 




Chandler & Co.'s buyer has just returned 
from Paris, where he secured a number of 
original models which will be reproduced at 
very moderate prices. 



Cfjanbler & Company 

151 Fremont Street, Boston 



152 



LASELL LEAVES 



CORDUROY 
NEGLIGEES 



That are New 



Warm as a Blanket and Rich 
and Attractive in appearance 

Made of Pink, Cherry, Wistaria, Blue and Ca- 
nary Corduroy, lined throughout with white silk 
in long loose robe effects. 

A $12.00 NEGLIGEE 

FOR $8.50 

(MAIL AND TELEPHONE ORDERS GIVEN 
CAREFUL ATTENTION) 

C. F. Hovey Company 

Summer, Chauncy and Avon Streets 
BOSTON, MASS. 




The Plastic Shoe 



(Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 




In Low or High Cut 
and also in Pumps 



The Plastic Shoe 
is the result of 30 
years of study in 
the search for a 
shoe that will help 
all foot troubles and 
still retain a grace- 
ful appearance. 

The Plastic Shoe 
assists one to walk 
as nature intended. 
It removes the 
strain and ache 
resulting from walk- 
ing or standing in 
ill fitting shoes. 



Thayer, McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



When You Visit Lasell Stop at 

NYE PARK INN 

46 GROVE STREET 
Between the Seminary and Station 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

FIRE PROOF GARAGE 



LASELL 



CHINA AND GLASS 

The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in this line 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glass 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits every season by our buyers to the 
best makers in Great Britain, France, Germany, Austria and Amer- 
ica. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery a<1 *■#, H , ^ ; 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT^ . IT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS ' ^ Gallery 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Go. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

FRANKLIN, COR. HAWLEY ST., BOSTON 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 



Compliments of 

GEO. J. BARKER LUMBER CO. 



LEAVES 

HAYDEN 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 

College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 



153 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



George C. Folsom 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 

W. F. HADLOCK 
Newsdealer and Stationer 

Developing and Printing 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CAPODANNO & ALBANO 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco. 

431 AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Tel. Con. 



C. A. DONOVAN 

345 AUBURN STREET AUBURNDALE 

Ladies' and Men's Furnishings 
Dry Goods and Small Wares 



ELLIOTT VV. KEYES 
PHARMACIST 
Drugs- Medicines-Chemicals-Choice Confections 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 




COTTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 
CAPS and GOWNS 

to the American Universities and 
Colleges, to Lasell Seminary and 
scores of other Academies 

CLASS CONTRACTS A 
SPECIALTY. 

PULPIT and CHOIR GOWNS. 



newton Ice Company 

MILLER BROS. 
Address! 06 Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 



PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Receipts 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 PORTLAND STREET, BOSTON 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for Price List of over 60 kinds 




CARDS A.NJD GIFTS 

Tlie K"e^?v Slxo;p 

149 TREMONT ST., ROOM 923, BOSTON, MASS. 

Waists and Dresses Made at Low Prices 
WAISTS $3.50 DRESSES $8.00 & $10.00 



C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 
Jfflustc Bealers 

Announce their Removal to 

2B Park Street, Boston. Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Three doors above their old store. Send for our recent 
catalogues. Mail orders filled the same day as received. 
Music sent on selection if desired. 



154 



LASELL LEAVES 



SCHOOL 
STATIONERY 



Note Books 

Students' Paper 
Fountain Pens, etc. 



Engraved and Printed 



Programs 



Invitations 



Dance Orders 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON 7 SQUARE 



BOSTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 686 Haymarket 



SPORT COATS 

MACKINAWS 

SERGE MIDDY SUITS 



SPECIALTIES 

FOR 

COLLEGE GIRLS 



Send for Illustrated Booklet 

Henry S. Lombard 

22 to 26 Merchants Row 
BOSTON, MASS. 




Ladies are delighted 

with the results of using Camp- 
bell's Stain on Floors, Furni- 
ture and Woodwork. 

Gives superb finish, brings out 
the natural grain of the wood. 
Write for color card 

Carpenter-Morton Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Established 1882 



Incorporated 1904 



GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Cosftumerg 

6 Boylston Place, Boston, Mass. 

College Dramatic Work a Specialty 
Telephone Oxford 145 



Jflaugug 
^Printing 
Company 

OTeUesIei' 
jfla&sacfmsietts 



LASELL LEAVES 155 



The 

ALLERLEI 

of the Class of 1915 



Will be ready for distribution in about two weeks. It is now 
in the hands of the printers, and will contain 186 pages with 
nearly 300 illustrations. This book is replete with original 
cuts and is by far the best ever published at Lasell. 

As the edition is limited, it is earnestly requested that you 
notify Bess Emerine at once if you desire a copy. 

The price of the book is only $2.00. 



156 LASELL LEAVES 



Telephones Haymarket 2311-2312 



Flowers 
of Quality 



HOUGHTON -GORNEY CO 

:-: Florists :-: 



119 TREMONT STREET, 

[Park Street Church] 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Specialty 

Flower Shop of Boston 



FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED TO ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Free Delivery to Lasell 



' 




•*-. 



164 

TREM0NT 

STREET 
f elephone Ox- 
ford 2687 



TWO STUDIOS 




161 

TREMONT 

STREET 

Telephone 

Oxford 858 




L 

■'TW« 



ET in relation to PORTRAIT 
■ PttO-TQGR APtt Y ie the 

realization of beauty, grace and 
intelligence, as expressed in the finished 
portrait. 

Our advanced 1915 styles we honestly believe 
will appeal to ^bu. Special discount rates 
all LaseU Students. 




lattlMBM B MWmifW I IIMMiWWl l l l 



Our Stock Never Gets Old 



NEW GOODS ARRIVE EVERY DAY 



^IjSWWIRSI 



WHOLESALE 






Diamonds 
Watches 
Silver Goods 
Combs 
Cut G ! ass 
Coral Jewelry 
Roman F earls 
Ebony Good* 



Vanity Cases 
Photo Frames 
Leather Goods 
Fountain Pens 
Brass Goods 
Chafing Dishes 
Percolators 
Parisian Ivory . 




n 

I 



Our WatcH and Jewelry Repair Department* do 
the best work a!: vary low prices 

MR. F; % DAVIDSON 

AUBURNDALE 




LASELL LEAVES 



157 



A. SHUMAN & CO. 

The Service Store, Boston 



Tailored Apparel for 
College Girls of 
Rare Distinction 



Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabrics — 

Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 

Splendid Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

13 V 2 Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



^: 



:^ 



We Can Please You 

Come and See for Yourself 

Dry Goods, Small Wares, Dress Goods, Silks, 
Velvets, Linings, Laces, Gloves, Ribbons, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Hosiery, Underwear, Millinery,Cloth- 
ing, Hats, Caps, Shoes, and Garments of every 
description. 



'P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-135-137-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 



PIANO C OLLE CTIONS 

HELM 

"SYLVAN SKETCHES" 

60c. 
LIND 

"THE SILENT MERE" 

60c. 
MESSAGER 

"DANCE SUITE" 

60c. 

PUBLISHED BY 

Ok Boston music Company 



26 and 28 
WEST ST. 



A 



BOSTON, 
MASS. 



TELEPHONE OXFORD 1561 



158 



LASELL LEAVES 



NEARLY A CENTURY IN 



CARPETS AND RUGS 



Few concerns in this country have so long a business 
record and none in Floor Coverings. 

A large, well selected stock, shown by experienced 
salesmen and the same methods that won the respect and 
patronage of parents and grandparents we believe will 
prevail with the present generation. 

Quality considered, it is our purpose not to be under- 
sold by any of our competitors. 

EVERYTHING IN FLOOR COVERINGS 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

646-650 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St. 



Meyer Jonasson & Go 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Waists, Furs and Sweaters 



GARMENTS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 
A SPECIAL FEATURE 




SPRING STYLES 




This new model 
comes in Patent 
Leather or Dull 
Calf with low heel 
and pearl button 
ornament. 
Price $5.50 



10% discount to students and faculty of Lasell. 



160 Tremont Street, Boston 









Lasell feus 



DUX FEMINA FACTI" 



Vol. XXXX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., MARCH, 1915 No. 6 

Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 
FLORENCE EVANS 



CAROL RICE 



Local Editor 
HELEN BENSON 



Assistant Local Editor ROSE BAER 



LIST OF OFFICERS 

Editor-in-chief 
DORIS WALLER 

Associate Editor 

Art Editor 
EDITH HODGES 

Assistant Art Editor, CHARLOTTE WHITING 

Personal Editor 
CATHARINE CARTER 



Subscription Editor 
FRANCES HARRIS 



Exchange Editor 
MAUDE HAYDEN 

Assistant Exchange Editor 
ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 

Staff Photographer BESS EMERINE 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



White Mountain Trip {frontispiece) 160 

Literary 161 

Locals 168 



CONTENTS 

Things Worth While 

Personal 

Editorial 

Exchanges 

Supplement 



173 
174 
175 
178 
280 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar Inside front cover 

Thomas Long I nside front cover 

A. Shuman & Co. 157 

Pinkham & Smith 157 

P.P.Adams .. 157 

Schirmer 157 

T. E. Moseley Co. 158 

Meyer Jonasson & Co. 158 

JonnH. Pray & Sons Co. 158 

Chandler & Co. 188 

Jordan Marsh Co. 188 

Thayer, McNeil Co. 189 

C. F. Hovey & Co. 189 

English Tea Room 189 

Nye Park Inn 189 

A. T. Bridges 190 

The New Shop 190 

C.W.Thompson .. 190 

Cottrell & Leonard 190 



W. F. Hadlock 

Capodanno & Albano 

C. A. Donovan 

Elliott W. Keyes 

Hayden 

Newton Ice Co 

Geo. J. Barker Lumber Co. . 
Jones. McDuffee & Stratton 

George C. Folsom 

Damon 

H. S. Lombard 

Carpenter, Morton 

George P. Raymond 

Maugus Printing Co. 

Houghton-Gorney Co. 

Allerlei 

Consignor's Lunch 

L. P. Hollander 



190 

190 

190 

190 

... 190 
. 190 

190 

190 

190 

191 

191 

191 

191 

191 

192 

Inside back cover 
Inside back cover 
Inside back cover 



160 



LASELL LEAVES 




00 



be 

Oh 






< 



i— i 

ffi 
H 



O 

u 

c/3 



Mimm 



WHAT THE WATCHMAN HEARD 

"Squeak, squeak, squeak," went the watch- 
man's thick boots as he walked over the 
thinly carpeted floor of one of the corridors 
of the Oxford Seminary for Young Women. 
It was somewhere around two or three o'- 
clock and the whole place was wrapped in a 
death-like silence, broken only by the regular 
tread of the care-taker as he made his rounds 
of the building. It was his duty to go through 
all the corridors of the building to see that 
everything was all right. On this night he was 
passing the English classroom, swinging his 
lantern, when — wait, he heard something. 
"Burglars, probably, and in the English 
room of all places!" 

Ideas of heroism and sweet fame flashed 
through the watchman's mind as he made his 
way boldly to the English room. Quickly and 
cautiously turning the knob he entered, 
flashed on the electric light and saw — nothing, 
nobody: everything was in perfect order 
and silence. 

"Well, I sure did fool myself into thinking 
I heard something," he muttered. "It was 
that everlasting imagination of mine thai 
plays such tricks on me. Why won't it let 
me alone?" 

Still muttering he turned out the light and 
went out. But he had not gone far when 



again he heard a noise. Yes, it was some 
person talking, more than one. Many- 
voices, and laughter! Quickly and angrily 
he jerked open the door just in time to see 
the Century Dictionary pick up the covers of 
his leaves and gaily dance across the desk. 
Was he going mad? Did he see aright? "Why 
I must be crazy!" he thought, but no, the 
sight was so real, that extinguishing his light, 
he decided to hide himself in a corner and 
watch what would happen. Soon the large 
open-faced clock began to talk. 

"Come on now fellows! Let's have one 
good rousing time before the old man (mean- 
ing the watchman), comes around. This is a 
chance in a lifetime. Tune up there you dull 
pencils and give us some thing lively." 

Immediately from somewhere, came a 
light, but lively tune; such a hustle as 
there was among the books as to which should 
have the best dancer. Everyone, the ink 
bottles, pens, calendar and clock and class 
papers was chosen until only the wire basket 
and the blotter remained. The wire basket 
seemed to be very unpopular because she 
was so very clumsy, while the poor blotter 
had been naughty and as a punishment had 
been tacked down to the ugly desk so that it 
was impossible for her to move. Thus it was 
that the wire basket, who was very kind at 



162 



LASELL LEAVES 



heart, went over and sat in the blotter's lap 
and they consoled each other and told their 
troubles. 

The pencils were so dull that the music 
soon stopped and with a gasp for breath the 
dancers hurried for a cool place. The con- 
versation began. The Century, as he was the 
biggest of the group and had the largest 
vocabulary, took the floor. 

"Well, I must say, this is a delightful affair, 
Miss Clock. If it had not been for you, we 
should all have been lying lazily around on 
the hard desk without any idea of the safe- 
ness of the hour for a ball." 

"Yes, indeed," piped up the calendar, 
"you can't imagine what a joy it is to me to 
have one night of my short life used for some 
thing pleasant. They treat me abominably 
around here, tearing off the worn parts of my 
body, which are sometimes very dear to me, 
and putting them where I never see them 
again." 

"Well, your life is all joy compared 
with mine," grumbled the Rhetoric. "If 
you had remarks hurled at you such as 
I have at me! Nobody likes me and 
the way some of those horrid girls throw 
me around and say spiteful things about 
me, it seems sometimes as if I must 
tear myself to pieces and then see what they 
would do without me. One is never appre- 
ciated during one's life, I fear," and he 
sighed so deeply as to cast a gloom on the 
whole assembly. 

"Well, I know one thing! Not one of you is 
treated half as badly as I," sighed one of the 
class papers. "And my brothers and sisters 
have to undergo the same fate. Why yester- 
day, I was just congratulating myself upon 
how perfect I was and how altogether attrac- 
tive, when eager hands snatched me and with 
a sharp point pierced my left side repeatedly 
and marred my entire face with some horrid 
red stuff, that ruined me for always." 

"Here, here," cheerily cried the clock. 
"No more of this business. We are here to 
enjoy ourselves and to tell of the joys of life, 



not of its sorrows. Everyone has his troubles 
but everyone has also his pleasures, and the 
more thankful he is for his blessings, the more 
will he have. I, for one, thank the good 
maker for giving me eyes that I may see real 
people as they walk to and fro and a voice 
that I may talk to them and tell them the 
hour, and for the kind owner who keeps 
my heart beating every day. 'What would 
they do without me?' I ask myself, then I 
talk all the more loudly and accurately. 
But, my dears, do you realize the hour? It 
is nearly four and time for the man with the 
light to come around. Come, Miss Basket, 
leave your lover and hurry back to your place. 
I can almost see daylight through the win- 
dow." 

In about two seconds, during which there 
was a lively hustle and pushing of papers, the 
desk became inanimate and as silent as though 
nothing had ever disturbed its peace. The 
watchman, not believing his eyes, rubbed 
them and then looked again. No, nothing 
was moving. Everything was silent except 
for the regular ticking of the clock. Still 
half-dazed and not understanding he lighted 
his lantern and slowly withdrew casting back 
suspicious glances at the quiet room. 

Sarah Hammond. 



A CHEMICAL COURTSHIP 

March 1 — "Wanted, a respectable middle- 
aged spinster, with some idea of Chemistry, 
as assistant in chemical laboratory. Apply 
420 Marlborough St." 

Yes, dear little Diary, this is the exact "ad" 
that I read to-day. You know I have been 
assigned to do "A Chemical Courtship," for 
the Short Story Magazine, to be ready 
within ten days. Can you imagine me, with- 
out the slightest idea of Chemistry, writing 
the courtship of a Mr. Oxygen to some kind 
of a Miss Acid? I can't. Just as I had de- 
cided to bury my Titian head in some musty 
Chemistry book, written by someone who 
had a grudge against people in general, I 



LASELL LEAVES 



163 



discovered the above "ad," and, Diary dear, 
/ am going to answer it tomorrow. 

March 2 — Well, little Book, I am going to 
call you friend, as it makes you seem, more 
real that way; I went, and what is more to the 
point I was accepted. Now, I'll tell you all 
about it: — I, Patricia McDonald, aged twen- 
ty-two, red haired, brown-eyed, short, slender, 
and, to be perfectly truthful, fairly good 
looking, arrayed myself in a grey wig, plain 
black suit, and black sailor hat, and started 
out. I reached 420 Marlborough St., rang 
the bell, and was ushered into a dilapidated 
looking hall, by a colored woman, who, after 
finding out my mission, left me with "you jes' 
makeyo'self at home and I'll call marster." 

I made myself as comfortable as possible 
and, after probably five minutes, "He," en- 
tered. "Good after-noon Miss— — ," 

"Lucretia Brown," I prompted. 

"Miss Brown," he continued, "Of course, 
you have come in answer to my advertise- 
ment in the Evening Times. Have you 
had any experience in Chemistry?" 

"Well, Mr.—," "Jack Smith," he supplied. 
"Mr. Smith," I continued, lowering my eyes, 
"I have had some training,— ' which, by the 
way, consisted of one-half year high school 
work, but I didn't tell him. that- "and I 
pride myself on learning easily and on being 
very reliable." 

"Then, come tomorrow morning at eight 
and start in work," said Mr. Smith; and I 
found myself on the porch looking at a closed 
door, accepted as middle-aged assistant in 
Mr. Smith's laboratory. 

March 3 — Dear Friend: Today was my 
first day of work, and, horror of horrors, I'm 
already in love with Mr. Jack Smith.. I 
know that the wise men of to-day say that 
there is, psychologically, no love at first 
sight, but I insist that there is. I knew I 
had fallen in love with him, as soon as I saw 
him again to-day. He is wonderful, dear 
little friend, so tall and slender, not thin, 
with black hair and slightly stooped shoulders, 



and with eyes like big, dark grey pools. I 
did a good day's work, — that is I cleaned up 
the laboratory, which took until five o'clock 
which is my leaving time. I found the "lab" 
all dusty and mixed up, just like my desk 
when I can't make the hero of my story be- 
have, and I left it as spick and span as a 
middle-aged spinster should, with all the 
bottles and things shining away in the late 
afternoon sun, as happy as could be. 

March 4 — Dear little Friend of mine: To- 
day I spent the time hurrying to and fro from 
the storage room, with my arms full of all 
sorts of bottles, and my heart jumping into my 
throat every time I looked at "Him." When 
I left, he said, "You are proving a great help, 
Miss Brown." For a minute, I felt like run- 
ning and embracing him for the praise, but I 
counted ten first, and then only said, "Thank 
you, sir," in the most approved manner 
and left. 

March 5 — Dear Friend : The most embarras- 
sing thing happened to-day. I had been 
doing my work as usual, and had just finished 
washing out a glass jar that had contained 
some awful nasty stuff that made me almost 
sick even to look at, when, on turning around, 
I saw him looking at me in the queerest sort 
of way. Child that I am, I immediately 
dropped the jar and it fell to the floor with 
an awful crash and broke into a million 
pieces and I burst out crying. He came 
over and said, in that deep voice of his, "Never 
mind, accidents are always likely to happen." 

"Yes, sir, thank you sir," I murmured. 
Then he went over into the corner and con- 
tinued his work and I went on tidying up, 
with joy singing away in my heart. 

March 6 — Dear Friend: Lest you should 
think that I am only wasting my time in falling 
in love, I must tell you that I have learned that 
H 2 + O = H 2 O and that N H 3 = Ammonia, 
also that one must be very careful not to get 
too friendly with iodine. I'm getting almost 
afraid of myself as I'm becoming so brilliant. 

March 7 — To-day I learned that sulphuric 



164 



LASELL LEAVES 



acid is probably the most combustible acid 
known. While I was washing the tubes, I 
began humming to the tune of "Tipperary," 
"Sulphuric acid would kill poor Patty, Sul- 
phuric acid is probably the most combustible 
acid there is." All of a sudden, Mr. Smith 
said, "You are singing, Miss Lucretia Brown," 
emphasis on the "Brown." 

Incidentally I stopped humming, but just 
between you and me, little Friend, he is be- 
ginning to like me. 

March 8 — Little Friend dear: To-day as I 
finished cleaning up, I looked around and 
found Mr. Smith looking at me in the queerest 
way. Later, I was passing by the mirror and 
I discovered that my wig had slipped away 
from over my left ear and a red curl was hang- 
ing out. I wonder if Mr. Smith saw it or 
was only looking at me because the spark of 
love is beginning to flicker. I wonder! 

March 9 — Today, butter-fingers that I 
am, I spilled iodine all over my hands. Mr. 
Smith came hurrying over and wiped them off 
on his span clean handkerchief ; all the while 
murmuring, "Poor dear, you must be more 
careful!" What a peculiar thing to say to a 
staid assistant. 

March 10 — Oh, dearest little Friend: It 
has happened. I, Patricia McDonald, who 
always said that I would not stoop to marry 
anyone except a count or a Vanderbilt, am to 
be Mrs. Jack Smith. I'll tell you how it 
happened: — To day Mr. Smith stepped over 
to the drug store, across the way, to get some 
acid or other and, while he was gone, as my 
hair felt loose, I went over to the mirror and 
took off my wig. As I was just pinning up an 
obstinate lock, I felt two, strong arms 
around me and, turning my head, I looked 
up into those eyes of "his." 

"Lucretia," he breathed. 

"Patricia McDonald," I corrected. 

"Darling," he whispered. 

After a little while I laughed, "Oh, this is 
'A Chemical Courtship!' " 

"Yes," he said, "One Patricia plus one 
Jack make happiness." 



But between you and me, little Friend, 
neither this nor any other "Chemical Court- 
ship" will appear in the Short Story Maga- 
zine, by Patricia McDonald. 

G. Frauenthal. 



THE BEST MAN 

"Clickety-click, clickety-click," sang the 
car wheels as they spun swiftly toward Dal- 
ton. Eugenia Powers gazed fixedly out of the 
train window but the thoughtful blue eyes 
saw none of the rolling green hills, the slightly 
swaying trees, and the well-kept white farm 
houses, with their even better kept huge red 
barns, which are so characteristic of the west. 
The girl's eyes were looking back through 
five years of the past, when she, with her 
three chums, had received her diploma. How 
well she remembered the serious and 
saddened faces of all her classmates. She 
smiled faintly — it rather amused her now — 
but it had been serious and sad then. It 
meant the end of her school life and the 
parting from three of the truest and dearest 
girl friends she had ever had. Fate had 
brought them together from four different 
sections of the country, she had made them 
inseparable for four years; she had sent them 
back to their respective homes; and in spite 
of the girls' solemn pledges that they would 
return the next spring for commencement, 
they had not seen each other for five years. 

But at last, Fate, relenting, had beckoned 
them to this western town of Dalton. How 
different from the plans of their first meeting 
after they had left school! Abbie would be 
there with her husband and her son and 
daughter. Eugenia caught herself just in 
time to prevent the merry chuckle that arose 
to her lips. Abbie and her son and daughter! 
How strange it seemed but how sweet and 
lovable Abbie must be as a mother. Eugenia 
glanced at her small jeweled wrist-watch im- 
patiently. Twenty minutes to wait! It 
would seem like twenty hours, so anxious was 
she to see her chums. Then, Helen's happy, 
boyish face flashed before her mind's eye, as 



LASELL LEAVES 



165 



she once more let her thoughts of the past 
predominate. She couldn't remember when 
Helen hadn't smiled. She had even laughed 
when, three days before the Princeton Prom, 
she had slipped and sprained her ankle, there- 
by putting an end to this long, looked-for 
festivity. 

"Cheer up," she had exclaimed when the 
girls had appeared lamenting for her sake. 
"I'll go next year. Jim will be a Junior then 
and I'll appreciate it just that much more 
for waiting a year." 

And she did go next year, she did appreci- 
ate it "just that much more" and showed her 
appreciation to Jim by becoming engaged to 
him. They had been married last year when 
Eugenia was in Spain. And now she won- 
dered what kind of a man pretty Anita was 
engaged to — Anita, with her charming manner 
and her fascinating quaint drawl. It was 

to her wedding that Eugenia was going 
accompanied by Wonder, Excitement and 
Eagerness. 

"Dal ton! Next station, Dalton!" called 
the conductor. 

Unending train yards had to be passed 
through, the engine kept going slower and 
slower; it stopped, puffed jerkily on for a few 
rods, clamped its brakes for the fourth time 
and finally wormed its way into the station. 

It was the same old story of girls meeting 
girls after a week or a year — it matters little 
which length of time, the scene is always the 
same — of separation. The old gateman, who 
had faithfully slid the creaking iron-barred 
door back and forth for the last twenty- 
five years, smiled and winked appreciatively 
at his younger conrade at the next gate. 
Many times he had seen such scenes and 
many more times he would see them. But 
how he enjoyed them! They relieved the 
dreadful monotony of the dirty station with 
its dark walls staring blankly at the long, 
hard benches, which held so many people of a 
far different sort. They seemed to obliterate 
the sight of the slovenly gang of workmen 
bound for some unheard of place. As the 



group passed out of the station, laughing and 
chattering, the dusky waiting-room once more 
resigned itself to the inevitable sounds of 
shuffling feet and wailing children. 

'Gene, you're the last one left," declared 
Abbie with a little sigh, as they sped toward 
Anita's home. 

"But, Abbie dear, please don't say it in 
that hopeless tone," pleaded Eugenia, pout- 
ing her red lips. "I can't help it, you know, 
I've tried my best but — " a helpless gesture 
of her long, white hands both emphasizing 
and finished her sentence. 

This was greeted with a shout of merri- 
ment followed by a chorus of, "Still the same 
old 'Gene. Heart-whole and carefree, eh!" 

"Yes, still unattached and presumably, 
always will be. I'd rather have my own way 
and do as I please — go here, there and the 
other place." 

"Oh, get married. It's great!" ejaculated 
the year old bride, Helen, bouncing up and 
clown on the cushioned seat. 

"My word, I'm glad I'm not married if it 
affects me that way," put in Eugenia giving 
Helen's chin an affectionate little pinch. 
"Oh, we're already at your home, aren't we, 
Anita?" she asked as the car swerved from 
the road. 

The long, straight driveway, which led up 
to the house, was guarded on both sides by 
tall, stately poplars, which bowed gracefully 
and hospitably to all comers. As the machine 
rolled through the huge gate and down this 
shaded avenue, Eugenia caught the first 
glimpse of her friend's home. The house was 
a massive old place built of dull red brick 
and set far back from the street. Huge trees 
and a high fence, covered with ivy, kept 
prying eyes from discovering the secrets of 
the sunken Japanese garden, with its small 
oriental bridges spanning tiny, mirror-like 
ponds, its rustic benches, and its small, artis- 
tic tea-houses. As the machine swung around 
to the front of the house, a bright, sparkling 
lake burst, in dazzling beauty before her eyes. 
The smooth, velvet-green lawn sloped gently 



166 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



toward its shores. Well-kept gravel paths 
wound themselves about the clusters of rose 
bushes. 

The machine stopped before the steps. 
Father and mother, baby sister and nurse, 
the two waiting husbands and the waiting 
"almost husband" were there to receive the 
latest arrival. After all introductions she 
was escorted by Anita to her room overlook- 
ing the lake. 

"Now tell me about him," Eugenia de- 
manded, as though resigned to her fate, 
"We're alone now." 

"There isn't much to tell but that I am 
frightfully happy, I know you hate to hear an 
engaged girl talk so I'll not say a word. Now 
you tell me about yourself." 

'Gene laughed lightly. "There isn't even 
'much' to tell. I'm happy and am having a 
delightful time. Ho, hum, the rover's life 
for me. I wonder— ' she mused and then 
paused, staring at the ceiling. 

"You wonder what?" asked Anita curiously. 

"Oh, nothing. I'll have to be getting 
dressed, that's all," cried 'Gene jumping up 
from the couch. 

Anita arose also and opened a door leading 
to her own suite of rooms. They talked, 
from their rooms, of the girls, of the teachers, 
and of their good times when they had last 
been together. Peal after peal of laughter 
crept from beneath their hall-doors, as Mem- 
ory sharpened their wits on school days. 

"By the way," called 'Gene," what is the 
best man like? Stout, thin, or indifferent?" 
"Well," laughed Anita, "from what Phil 
says he must be altogether impossible. He's 
rather tall, but rather fat, and hates girls. 
And 'Gene, I'm sorry to tell you this — he has 
red hair. 

( To be continued) 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN SEEN AGAIN 

It happened one night in July Avhen we 
were walking along the cliffs overlooking the 
ocean, enjoying the play of a searchlight from 



a nearby Revenue Cutter, sweeping the 
waters. 

My companion and I were walking a little 
behind the others deeply engrossed in a 
heated discussion of some operatic music we 
had been playing on the Victrola. Suddenly 
we heard an exclamation of surprise and then 
an excited voice calling us. 

We hurried to overtake our friends and 
upon our arrival they pointed out what 
appeared to be a ship but surely a phantom 
ship, for we could see through her. She 
even had her red and green lights. We 
gazed spell-bound for a few seconds; then the 
moon went under a cloud and the ship was no 
longer to be seen. 

Everyone began to talk at once. Someone 
suggested fog, but fog on a moonlight night 
like that was impossible. In the silence which 
followed this remark we heard faintly the 
strains of the Crew Song from The Flying 
Dutchman. It fitted into the situation so 
well that we did not once think of the Victrola. 

Yes, surely, this was that phantom ship 
which used to haunt the seas for seven years 
at a time with one year of rest while the 
captain went ashore to find a woman brave 
and sweet enough to lift the curse from his 
ship by marrying him. Yes, surely this was 
the ship which brought bad luck to sailors, 
which brought sorrow on land and from which 
all other ships fled. 

And yet here it was in reach of the search- 
light of the Revenue Cutter, in plain sight, 
and near enough for us to hear the chorus 
of the crew as they neared land. To our 
excited fancy we could see the sailors hurrying 
about under orders of their sad, pale captain 
standing always in the stern. We could see 
the sails being furled and — but the moon 
went in again. 

Now came the jests. Was there a girl or a 
woman there who would give her life to save 
that pale sad man in the stern? Was there? 
Was there a man there who did not fear for 
his luck in the tournament next day? No! 

The moon did not come out clearly again 



LASELL LEAVES 



167 



so we returned homeward disappointed, but 
with a story to tell those lazy people who 
would not come out for a walk. Just as we 
turned into the path we heard the strains of 
the Crew Song being played on the Victrola. 
We turned to each other with rather shamed 
faces. Had we been guilty of visions? Just 
then the moon burst forth into such brilliancy 
that we did not doubt he was laughing at us. 
We turned back into our former path to 
think over our adventure and to decide if we 
would tell. — Elizabeth Stiles. 



DAWN AND DUSK 

Dawn — and from Heaven's cloudy breast, 
All rosy and warm at the breaking day, 
The little breezes are rushing forth 
To frolic o'er earth in their mad-cap play. 

Down through the sweet-breathed, golden air 
They whirl along in their merry flight, 
Stirring the petals of drowsy flowers 
And kissing away the tears of Night. 

Then onward, made richer, although all unknown, 
By perfumes rare with which flowers bless. 
They whistle a song through the dancing leaves 
And ruffled calm waters to restlessness. 

Dusk — and the days blue-bosomed Heaven 
With open arms waits patiently 
For the little truant breezes' return. 
She knew they would weary of their play. 

Back over the drowsy, shadowy earth 
Come the breezes. Gaily? No 
But laden with fragrant richness 
Which they scatter as they go. 

No longer do they tumble and tease 
But with gentle, tender caress 
They rock the flowers and still the birds. 
Over the darkening waters' breast. 

They hover low for one last kiss 

And as they pause — do they sigh? 

The song which they croon through the stirring leaves 

Is a sweet, sweet lullaby. 

Marguerite Belt. 



ITS NOTE OF PROTEST 

"So Miss Banger played for you? She 
claims that she can make the piano speak." 

"Well, I'll bet if it spoke it would say: 
'Woman, you have played me false.' — Ex. 





MONOGRAMS 

OF 

TWO CLASS OFFICERS 








THE WHITE MOUNTAIN TRIP 

It was a jolly party of fifty who started 
for the mountains with Miss Warner, on 
Friday, February 12! After an early break- 
fast and hurried packing, the girls man- 
aged to get a 7.35 train from Auburndale 
which made it possible to leave the North 
Station at 8.50. The party conpletely filled 
a special coach attached to the regular train. 
At Haverhill, "Daddy" Bassett joined them 
and brought with him a great many pairs 
of snowshoes and skiis which he had stowed 
in the smallest conceivable space. Many 
eager questions were thrown at him by the 
girls who took this trip last year as to the 
condition of the snow, their possibilities of 
sleeping out-of-doors, and numerous others 
which came so rapidly that even "Daddy" 
couldn't answer them all. 

After five hours of fun and rest ( ?) the girls 



reached Intervale and were taken in large 
sleighs to the Bellevue Hotel where there was 
a hot dinner awaiting them. In an incon- 
ceivably short time, the girls, who were able 
to find their bags, were dressed in bloomers, 
heavy boots, sweaters, and caps, all ready for 
the fun which was awaiting them. 

As soon as all were ready, they hitched up 
to go trailing and spent the rest of the after- 
noon either hanging on for dear life or dog- 
trotting along beside the bob-sleds. Star- 
light toboganning occupied the evening for 
most, while a few remained in to write letters. 

Until noon of the next day, the girls enter- 
tained themselves in whatever way they 
chose. Then, equipped with snow-shoes, they 
all started on the hike up into Cathedral 
Woods where they had lunch around a large 
fire. Oh, didn't that bacon, those sand- 
wiches, doughnuts, cookies, coffee and cake 



LASELL LEAVES 



169 



taste good! After waiting just long enough 
after the dinner to have some pictures taken, 
they started on long tramps, all taking 
different directions, some not reaching home 
until late that afternoon. After supper, a 
new form of amusement, which former parties 
have not enjoyed, was offered. All donned 
skirts, much to everyone's dislike, and went in 
large sleighs to the North Conway "Movies." 
Besides taking in all the pictures, they assisted 
in the program, that is, they sang a Lasell 
song which was thrown on the screen. Nell 
Woodward, as accompanist, came up to all 
our expectations as a "Movie" player. 

There was not so much snow but that the 
girls could take the long ride to Jackson and 
back, Sunday morning. The ride was great 
and the short coasts furnished by the bob- 
sleds which they had trailed along, added 
much to the fun; also, a number of the girls 
attempted to sit on the bob-sleds all the way 
back and when they weren't running to catch 
up with the team, after a spill, enjoyed the 
ride very much. Sunday dinner was a grand 
surprise! There was a pretty Valentine at each 
one's place and a wonderful turkey dinner 
which the ride in the clear mountain air had 
fitted us to appreciate. A long tramp up Mt. 
Surprize filled Sunday afternoon with pleasure. 
Mt. Surprize rightly deserves its name, for 
you come suddenly out of a pine woods onto 
a small summit from which there is a glorious 
view. 

A few girls went out that evening for their 
farewell slide down the toboggan, while the 
others remained at the Hotel and enjoyed 
some beautiful music which made a pleasant 
end to such a successful day, Just before 
bedtime, they were all treated to a sugaring- 
off. To those who had never been to such a 
party it was a novel experience and to all an 
enjoyable one. 

On Monday morning, there was a grand 
rush in order to have breakfast and get all of 
those clothes into the suitcases before nine- 
thirty. 

It was not quite such a gay party which 



left Intervale, as was the one which had 
entered it. Yet no tears were shed. "Daddy" 
Bassett, who did so much to give the girls a 
good time, left at Haverhill, amid shouts, songs 
and yells. As the train was on time, they 
arrived at school about five o'clock, everyone 
declaring that the week end had been just 
the grandest ever, and that Miss Warner was 
a wonderful chaperon, entering into the 
spirit right along with the girls. 

The Leaves staff owes an apology to the 
Sophomore class, for through some mistake 
an account of the Sophomore-Senior party 
was omitted from the December Leaves. The 
Sophomores gave a most original party on 
Nov. 16 and did everything possible to enter- 
tain their sister class at their "Circus." Half 
of the Gym was arranged for side shows in- 
cluding the Fat Lady of the Circus, a Hotten- 
tot, an elephant, a tiger, lion, the snake 
charmer. When the Seniors were admitted 
to the "large tent" the Sophomores gave them 
a regular three ring circus performance, with 
clowns, the bareback rider, and the animals. 
Unlike most circuses ice-cream cones and 
crackerjack and peanuts, pink lemonade, 
whistles and balloons were given to the specta- 
tors. After the circus dancing and fortune- 
telling were enjoyed. The party was pro- 
nounced a very great success. The Sophomores 
are surely to be congratulated for their origi- 
nality and hospitality. 

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 

Saturday night, February 20, we celebrated 
Washington's Birthday by a formal dinner 
and dance in the gymnasium. All the girls, 
and teachers too, dressed as in colonial days, 
powdered their hair; and with their velvet 
patches and rouge could never have been 
mistaken for a twentieth century girl. As 
the procession, led by Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, 
Miss Potter and their guests, entered the 
dining room, they saluted the flag held by 
Nellie Woodward and Helen Benson; and 
took their places at the tables prettily deco- 
rated with red carnations and white menu 



170 



LASELL LEAVES 



cards in the shape of hatchets. The cards 

bore appropriate quotations as well as the 

the following attractive menu : 

Oysters on Half Shell 

Celery 



Stuffed Olives 
Roast Turkey 



Salted Almonds 
Cranberry Jelly 



Giblet Sauce 
Squash 



Mashed Potatoes 

Asparagus Salad, French Dressing 
Harlequin Ice Cream 
Cakes 
Crackers Cheese Coffee 

Bonbons 

Everyone joined in singing "My Country, 
'Tis of Thee" which the orchestra played at 
the close of the dinner. A dance in the gym- 
nasium followed until ten o'clock. We are 
sorry Washington's birthday comes but once a 
year. We were delighted to have with us the 
following old girls ; Evelyn Schmidt, Griselda 
Downes, Dorothy Smith, Mildred Goddard 
and Eunice Votaw. 



A new election for Student Council was 
recently held in order to fill the places of 
those going out of office at the end of this 
term. Now the Student Council members are 
as follows: 
Seniors — Nell Woodward 

Susan Tiffany 

Margaret Bauman 

Martha Schuman 
Juniors — Marian Beach 

Frances Harris 

Mabel Straker 

Carol Rice 
Sophomores — Jessie Shepherd 

Mary Frances Moore 
Freshmen — Beatrice Beach 
Preparatory — Helen Moebs. 
Specials — Ruth Webb 

Florence Baker 

Norma MacMillan 



STUDENTS' RECITAL 

Lasell and its guests enjoyed a pleasant 
Pupils' Musical Rehearsal, Wednesday night, 
February 24. Each participant deserves 
special credit. The program was as follows: 



PIANOFORTE Valsette and Cradle Song 
Etude de Salon 
Miss Garnsey 

PIANOFORTE Romance 

Miss Whipple 



VOICE 



Absent 
La Serenata 
Miss Klenze 



Schutt 
Chopin 

Sibelius 



Cadntan 
Tosti 



PIANOFORTE Sonata in D major (first movement) 

Haydn 
Miss Merrill 



VIOLIN Reigen seliger Geister 

Bourree 

Miss Snedeker 



Gluck 
Bach 



PIANOFORTE Nocturne in E-flat Chopin 

(Organ part composed by Joseph A. 
Hills) 
Miss Dearborn 



VOICE 



VIOLIN 



VOICE 



Oh Mariner 

When Phyllis Comes 

Miss Benson 
Cavatina 

Miss Hall 



Centanini 
Chadwick 



Raff 



Were my song with wings provided 

Hahn 
Miss Brix 



PIANOFORTE Impromptu 

Miss Cloake 



VOICE 



To Music 

Miss Hale 



PIANOFORTE La Filieuse 

Miss Robinson 

PIANOFORTE The Lark 

Miss Ray 

VOICE Lotus Flower 

To Music 
Miss Laubenstein 
PIANOFORTE Hexentanz 

Miss Hoag 

VOICE The Rain Drop 

Stay, My Love 

Miss Apfelbaum 

PIANOFORTE Polonaise Tschaikowsky 

Misses Irvine, Benson, Garnsey and Dearborn 



Rein hold 
Schubert 
Raff 
Balakirew 
Franz 

MacDowell 
Gilberte 



On Wednesday, March 11, the German de- 
partment entertained their friends in the par- 
lors at tea from five until six. A clever little 
program was arranged consisting of solos by 
La el Irvine, and Hala Zach, a little operetta 
"Hans and Leisel" by Misses Johnson, Moebs, 
Risser, Patterson, Belt and Overholser. 
Several German songs were sung by Misses 
Gates, Shephard, Youtz and Hall. 



LASELL LEAVES 



171 



BASKET BALL 

Lasell met Radcliffe in basket ball March 2 
at half past four in the Radcliffe gymnasium, 
in Cambridge. Our team put up a brave 
fight but lost to the score of 37-2. The team 
comprised: Florence Evans, Captain; Carol 
Rice, Katharine Allen, Dorothy Mathias, 
Helen Gerrett, Mabel Straker, Marie Kolb. 
Substitutes; Orissa Attwill, Nellie Woodward 



Wednesday night, February 17, Mr. Frank 
Watson, a graduate of New England Con- 
servatory of Music gave a piano recital in the 
gymnasium. It was very greatly enjoyed. 

The program was: 

MacDowell Sonata Eroica 

Slow, with nobility — Fast. 
Elf-like, as light and swift as possible. 
Tenderly, longingly, yet with passion. 
Fiercely, very fast. 
Paderewski Nocturne — B-flat major 




.„_ ■ . ;•>,.* 



and Elsie Doleman. A large number of the 
girls attended the game. 

Monday night, March 1, the Sophomores 
decorated Miss Packard's table for the 
basket ball team who came to the dining room 
from the kitchen, in lock step, singing one of 
their own basket ball songs. They were seated 
by the Sophomores. The table was decorated 
with a huge basket of yellow daffodils; place 
cards and favors of little kewpies in basket 
ball suits with a big L. on them.. The team 
surely did appreciate the Sophomores' kind- 
ness. 



Chopin 



Preludes 





No. 


3 - 


— in G maj 


or 








No. 


21- 


—in B-flat 


major 








No. 


22- 


— in G-minor 








No. 


17- 


—in A-flat 


major 
















Etude — C minor 


Liszt 










Dante Fantasie 


A 


very 


pleasant 


reception 


followed 


the 


concert. 













March 6, in the morning mail all the Juniors 
received letters inviting them to come to a 
Senior Prom. In answer, the Seniors received 
telegrams and special deliveries saying that 
the Juniors would be there. Everyone is 
looking forward to a very good time. 



172 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



On March 12, the whole school was very 
much pleased to receive invitations to the 
Sophomore dance for St. Patrick's day in 
honor of their sister class, 1915. Thank you, 
Sophomores! 



Evelyn Dunham was hostess at Conversa- 
tion class Feb. 22. In keeping with the day 
the subject was "Patriotism." Elizabeth 
Beach was hostess the next week with the 
topic, "Fads and Fancies." We were very 
glad to have Miss Rand with us this week. 
On March 8, we had a very interesting con- 
versation on "Art" which was led by Martha 
Schuman. 



Thursday afternoon, February 25, at the 
usual lecture period, we were pleased to have 
with us Mrs. Mary Wiggin of Boston who is 
one of the leading workers in the Consumer's 
League. She spoke to us about what the league 
has done and what it hopes to do. A secretary 
from school was chosen and many of the girls 
are joining the league. Help the good work 
along. 

Thursday afternoons, February 18, March 
4 and 11, Dr. Winslow has been talking to us 
on Parliamentary Law. Since his first lecture, 
we have formed all kinds of Lasell Clubs, to 
put into practice before him, the right way to 
conduct a business meeting. We are very 
much interested in the lectures and are 
anxious to learn the "correct way." 

Mrs. Loomis's lecture, March 11, on Earn- 
ing and Spending was found to be especially 
suggestive. 



Three more new songs have been handed in 
during the past month; two are very good 
basket ball songs, one by Mildred Cloake, 
who wrote both words and music, and the 
other by Maude Hayden. Marion Newland 
has written a stirring school song to the tune 
of "It's a Long Way to Tipperary." 



ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR 

February 22 — Party to John McCormack 
Concert. 

February 27 — Party to Maude Adams in 
"Quality Street." 

February 27 — The Juniors took the Fresh- 
men, their sister class, to see 
Maude Adams in "Quality 
Street. ' ' This was a novel and 
attractive manner of class en- 
tertainment and since then we 
have heard many expressions 
of hearty approval from the 
Freshmen. 

March 3 — Mr. Harbour, a personal friend 
of Dr. Winslow, entertained 
the school and many out- 
side guests with a very amusing 
lecture on "Blessed be Humor." 
After the lecture, a most en- 
joyable reception was held, the 
last of the annual receptions 
given by Dr. and Mrs. Wins- 
low to the students and friends 
of Lasell. 



EXTRA CREDITS 

(Given for excellent scholarship) 

Dorice Lord, 4 subjects, 93f%, 2 credits. 
Adolphia Garnsey, 4 subjects, 92f %, 2 credits. 
Carol Rice, 4 subjects, 92^%, 2 credits. 
Lucile Joscelyn, 5 subjects, 92|%, 2 credits. 
Helen Pope, 5 subjects, 9l|-%, 2 credits. 
Marian Beach, 4 subjects, 91%, 2 credits. 
Lenette Rogers, 6 subjects, 90f %, 3 credits. 
Dorothy Crane, 4 subjects, 89^%, 2 credits. 
Helen Overholser had honorable mention. 



SAVE YOUR PENNIES! 

The Junior Class wishes to announce that 
they will publish a 1916 calendar, to be gotten 
out in time so that it may be given as a 
Christmas gift. An announcement giving 
full particulars will be made later. 




VESPERS 

Sunday, February 14, the girls attended 
the vesper services of either the Episcopal or 
Congregational Churches. 

On the evening of February 21, the vesper 
service was in charge of the Missionary 
Society. Miss Mabel E. Haywood, the 
Executive Secretary of The International 
Institute for Girls in Spain gave us an enter- 
taining account of the school and of life in 
Spain. The lecture was supplemented by 
stereopticon views. 

Through the kindness of Mrs. Ruggles, the 
vespers on February 28 was conducted by the 
Liederheim School of Music. The following 
delightful program was given: 

Inspirer and Hearer of Prayer Marston 

Mr. Edwin Mitchell 
Trio (Gibson Mandolin, violoncello and piano 

Autumn Song Tschaikowsky 

Selections from the Holy City Gaul 

List the Cherubic Host 

Baritone Solo and Ladies' Chorus 
These are They 

Miss Pearl C. Hill 
Come Ye Blessed 

Miss Margaret E. Ruggles 
Ladies' Trio Eventide 

Mandolin, violoncello and piano trio 

Elegie and Consolation Aiherton 

The Day is Ended Bartlett 

Miss Virginia Hicks 

Like as an Hart Allitson 

Mrs. Ruggles with 'cello obbligato by Miss Ruggles 

On March the seventh, the Rev. Harry Beal 



gave a splendid talk, the theme of which, 
briefly stated, being this: through friendship, 
citizenship, and chitrchmanship we may 
transcend ourselves and fly to the rock that is 
higher than we are. 



CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR CALENDAR 

February 16 — Under the leadership of Laura 
Hale, a rather unusual, but 
most helpful and inspiring mus- 
ical prayer-meeting was con- 
ducted. The musical program 
was prefaced by suggestion as 
to profitable ways of keeping 
Lent. Helen Benson sang, 
"One Sweetly SolemnThought. 
"Abide with Me," was sung 
by Marion Newland. Onalee 
Lang and Norma MacMillan 
also sang. 

February 23 — Lucile Joscelyn led the prayer 
meeting, taking for her sub- 
ject, "Doing, not Dreaming." 
A number took part in the dis- 
cussion of the topic. 
—Christian Endeavor was led by 
Miss Packard, who gave a 
most helpful talk on "Ideals." 
As many of the Seniors as could 
do so accepted her invitation 
to "come and bring a friend." 



March 9 



EDITORIAL 




y /. 



7/ '/' 



'//. 



// 



// 





Now another year in the history of the 
Lasell Leaves is over. With the next number, 
a new staff comes into office to take up its 
duties. The editor wishes to take this oppor- 
tunity to express her sincere gratitude to the 
other members of the staff for their constant 
cooperation, and in their behalf to thank the 
entire school for their help. The girls seemed 
to have realized that the Leaves is their paper, 
and in many cases they have done everything 
that the staff could desire. For the new staff 
we have tried to select girls who we feel con- 
fident will do far more than merely keep up 
the present standard of the magazine; with 
your kindly criticism and suggestions they will 
be able to make the paper of increasing in- 
terest and value. And now again we thank 
the girls for their support and hard work, and 
express to the new staff our heartiest wishes 
for a most successful year. 



Assistant Loci! Editor — Margaret Allen. 
Personal Editor — Helen Merrill. 
Exchange Editor — Katharine Allen. 
Assistant Exchange Editor — Marguerite Belt. 
Subscription Editor — Jessie Shepherd. 
Assistant Subscription Editor — Margaret 

Powell. 
Art Editor — Edith Hodges. 
Assistant Art Editor — Charlotte Whiting. 



The new Leaves staff: 
Editor-in-Chief — Carol Rice. 
Assistant Editor — Maud Hayden 
Business Manager — Frances Harris. 
LocalEditor — Rose Baer. 



Thank you, girls, one and all for the splen- 
did spirit shown in the way you backed up 
the team at the Radcliffe game. It was a 
fine opportunity for you to show your appre- 
ciation of the hard work that the basket 
ball girls had done, and you certainly came 
up to all expectations. The singing was just 
fine and the keen interest which you all took, 
I am sure, helped the girls, playing, wonder- 
fully. Thanks are also in order for the new 
songs which were all very good and in- 
creased the spirit of the whole game. 
School loyalty was shown on every hand. We 
surely thank you all and hope that if Lasell 
plays any return games, you will encourage 
the team as you did us at the Radcliffe game. 




Cora Nicholson of Detroit, Mich., sends us 
the delightful news of the announcement of 
her engagement to Mr. Frank Benjamin 
Kinzler, and then adds an equally interesting 
item (for us) that they may come to Auburn- 
dale at Commencement time. We sincerely 
hope that they will come and give us an 
opportunity of expressing in person our hearty 
congratulations. 



groom. She carried a bouquet of violets and 
hyacinths with shower of lilies-of-the-valley. 
Aside from the fact of their beauty and sweet- 
ness, the bride chose violets as her special 
flower on this occasion because of the fact 
that the violet was her class flower when she 
graduated from Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, 
Mass., class of 1910." 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry Marshall Van Deusen 
announce the marriage of their daughter, 
Axie Lee to Mr. Thomas Thomson Logie on 
Saturday, February 20, at Westfield, Mass. 
Mr. and Mrs. Logie will be at home after the 
first of May at 75 Court Street, Westfield. 



Cards have been received, announcing the 
engagement of Olive F. Bates, '10 to Mr. 
George C. Dumas, both of Hanover, Mass. 
We are glad that Olive's future plans will, if 
carried out, keep her in New England. We 
extend our very hearty congratulations to 
these young friends. 



A very full and fascinating account of the 
wedding of Ina Belle McLean Hunt, '10, 
which appeared in one of the St. Augustine, 
Fla., papers, has come to us. We are tempted 
to reprint it but space forbids. We do venture 
to repeat the following interesting paragraph 
"As her only ornament, she wore a diamond 
lavellier of original design, the gift of (lie 



From Isabella Collins, '13, comes this 
message: "This afternoon I have been look- 
ing over my 'Memory Book,' and truly the 
name suits exceedingly well. How much I 
would give to be back at Lasell, located in 
Senior House and enjoying the presence of 
my classmates, if I could only close my eyes 
and find myself back with you all, how happy 
I'd be! The only mistake you make is— 
making a course two years instead of four." 



176 



LASELL LEAVES 



Isabella also encloses a newspaper clipping 
describing the wedding anniversary of her 
father and mother which feast was entirely 
planned by the daughter, and she adds, 
"Since October I have had complete charge 
of all decorating and planning for concerts, 
parties and weddings. So aside from orchestra 
work, and home work, I'm a very busy lady." 



Doris Powers, '11 writes from her home in 
Portland, Me., "After having such a pleasant 
time at the Lasell home gathering, I want to 
write and tell you how much I enjoyed it. It 
was splendid, and I am very glad I was there. 
It did seem so good to get back to Lasell 
again and to see so many of the 'old girls' 
and the dear teachers. It seemed quite natural 
to attend chapel and listen to Doctor Gordon. 
It all brought back so many sweet memories!" 
Thank you, Doris, you cannot come too often 
to please us! 



Another new Lasell girl — will probably 
enter in 1936! The little lady is Helen Gene 
Olson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene A. 
Olson (Edna Strickland, '07), born January 
30, 1915. Two young men who will probably 
matriculate at Harvard or Tech. at the same 
time are Master Gregory Simpson West, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. West (Agnes Wylie, '05) , 
born January 18, and Master Donald Wise 
Perin, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wise 
Perin ( Beatrice Cobb) born February 28. 
Lasell extends hearty congratulations to these 
favored parents and children. 



It was sort of tantalizing and decidedly 
disappointing to know that Evelyn Wires 
was in Auburndale as the guest of Jessie 
Macmillan, '82, but was unable to visit the 
Seminary. We hope, however, to see her in 
the near future. 



Alice Taylor Potter gave a delightful after- 
noon to several of the teachers one day not 
long ago. Mile. Le Royer, Miss Nutt, Miss 
Hotchkiss, Miss Witherbee and Miss Packard 



were taken for a ride in her automobile and 
then to her home for afternoon tea around an 
open fire. She proved a charming hostess, as 
was also her little daughter. 



Eleanor Laurens, '10, is busy at home with 
social and household duties and promises a 
visit to Lasell before many months. This is 
indeed good news! 



Through Jessie Joy Macmillan, '82 we have 
recent news from Sophie White Locke. She 
is in Seattle, Wash., with a group of college 
girls. She speaks of hearing from Grace 
Durfee, '85, who still lives in Marion, O. 



We were surprised and delighted this month 
to have a call from Nancy Boyce Van Gorder. 
She is still living in Willoughby, O., and seems 
as happy now as we remember her in her 
Lasell days. Well she may be, with a son at 
Williams and four daughters at home. We 
should like to see the five-year old twins. 



Alleda Burnett, '14, is doubtless now en- 
joying the sunny climate of California where 
she is travelling with her father and mother. 
Part of her message is too good to keep so we 
share it with the "old girls." She writes, 
"No one but myself understands all that Lasell 
meant to me. I feel that it helped me in 
more ways than any other school could have 
done and I will never cease thanking my 
parents for having sent me there." We, too, 
Alleda, are glad that you came to us! 



We would like to quote every word of 
Marion Jackson's dear message. After re- 
ferring to her and her sister's enthusiasm over 
Lasell, she tells us that she has been teaching 
kindergarten as a substitute and likes it very 
much, and gives us a hope that she may come 
East this spring. We thank her for her mes- 
sage and hope that "Sister" Hilda is still 
gaining. 

Ruth Vollrath, '12, is now a student of Art 
in Boston. She took time to report at Lasell 



LASELL LEAVES 



177 



and promises to be neighborly as possible. 
We certainly were glad to see her and not a 
bit surprised to find her looking "well and 
happy." 



In a personal letter to Miss Packard, Doctor 
Bragdon adds these interesting news items: 
"Etta Wolfe Whiting lives now at 734 Cherry 
St., Missoula, Mont. Her little son, Stanley, 
over four is a fine lad. The Warnocks (of 
Urbana, O.) are here this winter, including 
Elizabeth for a visit. Do give in the Leaves 
the list attending the reunions and always 
by the unmarried name (not husband's ini- 
tials)" We take the liberty of also noticing 
that Doctor Bragdon compliments our regis- 
trar on the fine supplements. He writes, "I 
do not believe the Leaves make much money 
for the girls. But it is very attractive! You 
see if the reunion list is in the Leaves, I can 
read it over slowly and have a little visit 
with each one. My love to Miss Blaisdell 
and to your mother, please." 



Genevieve Bettcher, '14 has recently paid 
a visit to her Alma Mater and was the guest 
of Helen Merrill. 

Griselda Downs, Eunice Votaw, '14, Evelyn 
Schmidt, '14, and Mildred Goddard have 
made us twice glad by their occasional "home 
coming" to Lasell. It did indeed seem good 
to welcome back these dear "old girls." 



Lela Goodall, '08 and Josephine Woodward, 
TO are already enthusiastically working up 
our June reunion. Lela tells us she is en- 
joying her new Brookline home, and that 
Mildred, TO is "way down South" in Miami 
Florida, living this winter just next door to 
Lillie N. Potter and her mother. 



Florence Skinner wrote an enthusiastic 
greeting to us from Smith College where she 
was the guest of Ruth Tuthill. 



Helen Shepherd Tiffany has surely kept a 
warm place in her great heart for Lasell. 
One of her choice tributes is this: "I call my 
year at Lasell the special golden year of my 
girlhood, for I did love it so, and, though I 
am as happy as I can be now, I never grow 
tired of thinking of all the good times I had 
then." And we cherish in our memory a 
very happy picture of this particular "old 
girl" as s Lasell student. 



Through the thoughtfulness of Winifred 
Conlin Clarke (Lasell '92-'95) of Kansas City, 
Mo., we receive the sad tidings of the death 
of Mary L. Woods, '73. Miss Woods was 
the daughter of Ex-Mayor Woods of Kansas 
City and niece of the late Chief Justice 
Fuller. Many of the "old girls" will be 
saddened to learn of the passing away of their 
former schoolmate. Our sincere sympathy 
is extended to the relatives and friends. 



We are glad to learn that Nell Jones Yeo- 
mans, '05 is convalescing from a very serious 
illness. Lucile Scott, '14 was recently the 
guest of Nell's sister, Barbara, '14, and while 
the girls were together Ernestine Lederer, '13 
joined them, and in Barbara's own words, 
"We spent a day just talking Lasell every 
moment!" Barbara is again taking up her 
kindergarten work and is enjoying it more than 
ever. 

We have recently learned that Mary Van 
Arsdel is enjoying a very happy and successful 
school year at a college in Atlanta, Ga. 



We were shocked and grieved to learn 
through Miss Irwin, a former member of our 
faculty, of the death of Ella Ellis Holway, '81. 
We would be grateful to have any further par- 
ticulars of this sad event. Ella's sons were 
pupils of Miss Irwin in high school days, and 
even then through their splendid scholarship 
gave promise of the success which has come 
to them in college. 

In February, Miss Kate Plummer, a former 
Lasell teacher, passed away in her Auburn- 
dale home. Miss Plummer's faithful, kindly 
interest in our school was greatly appreciated 
and we join with her neighbors and friends 
in mourning her loss and in extending our 
heartfelt sympathy to her bereaved family. 




AS WE SEE OTHERS 

The Roman — You have some clever jokes, 
but why mix them in with the advertisements? 

The Imp — Yours is a neat little magazine, 
but a few jokes would add to its interest. 

Neiv Trier Echoes — Your whole magazine 
is splendid. The prize story, "The Faur 
Hundra Punds," is exceptionally well-written; 
the prize poem, "The Old Kirk," is fine, and 
your cover design is very artistic. 

The Tatler (El Paso, Tex.) — You are the 
only one of our exchanges which does not 
list the names of papers received each month. 

The Tattler (Nashua, N. H.) — You have a 
very complete literary department, and the 
pen-and-ink sketches at the heads of the 
various departments are clever. 

The writer of the poem "Jeanne d'Arc in 
The Lion deserves much ccmmendation for 
an excellent piece of work. 

The Quill is one of the most complete maga- 
zines on our exchange list. The cover design 
is attractive and the departments are well- 
proportioned. The Exchange department is 
particularly worthy of note; contrary to the 
habit of most papers, you say more than a 
line about each magazine you criticize, and 
your criticise s are worth-while and helpful. 



The World — You must have good school 
spirit, for your paper appears well-backed. 
I have never read a more interesting ex- 
change. It is so well balanced. 

Bon Bon — Your paper would be greatly 
improved by a few cuts, especially depart- 
ment headings. They add so much to the 
general appearance of a paper as well as to the 
power to interest the readers. 

The Comet — Your photograph prints are 
not very clear, and in a graduating number 
they should have been especially clear. Your 
exchange department is exceedingly small. 

We are glad to welcome The Brimmer 
School Magazine among our exchanges. You 
have an attractive publication. But we 
think the different departments should be 
under separate and distinct heads, with cuts 
to identify them. Don't you think such an 
arrangement would improve your paper 
greatly? 

"Half Price," in The Forum, is a good story, 
and the editorial on school spirit has some 
strong points. Your margin cuts are very 
unusual. A better grade of print would im- 
prove your paper immensely. 

The Quarterly Tatler has a splendid literary 
department and interesting class notes. Your 



LASELL LEAVES 



179 



magazine is very neat, but rather too somber 
for a school magazine. A few cuts would help 
to liven it up somewhat. 

The Student (Detroit, Mich) — You publish 
an excellent paper. 



AS OTHERS SEE US 

Lasell Leaves — Your story, "The European 
Trip," is very interesting — but why don't 
you try to have a few jokes? — Stevens School 
Review. 

Lasell Leaves — Your clever cuts and ex- 
cellent photographs improve your paper won- 
derfully. Your cover designs are always 
worthy of mention. — The Philomat 

Lasell Leaves — We are pleased to see Lasell 
Leaves on our list again. We had not received 
a copy of it at the time of publication of the 
last Tabula. We always look forward to its 
arrival and are not disappointed this year, for 
it is up to its former standards in every respect. 
The splendid covers of Lasell Leaves are one of 
its best features. — The Tabula. 

Lasell Leaves — Your magazine is excellent. 
It is decidedly one of our best exchanges. 
Your departments are overflowing with splen- 
did articles which afford us a great deal of 
pleasure. Your photographs are fine, and 
make your paper very attractive. We hope 
to see you again next month. — The Virginian. 

Lasell Leaves — You have an unusually good 
paper for a school for women. No of- 
fense, girls. We simply mean that you have 
an active, energetic staff, whose work excels 
that of many editors in other schools. — X- 
Ray. 

Lasell Leaves — An old friend, and as wel- 
come as it is excellent. — The Roman. 

Lasell Leaves — You are one of our best 
exchanges and we hope you will continue to 
come often during this year. — Academe. 

Lasell Leaves — We are always glad to re- 
ceive your magazine. The various cuts 
make your magazine especially attractive.— 
K. H. S. Tatler. 

In Lasell Leaves for January, the prize- 
winning stories, "A True Heroine," and "Only 



a Brother," are far above the average attempts 
of a college student, and they reflect much 
credit upon their respective authors. 

Lasell Leaves acknowledges with thanks 
the receipt of the following magazines for 
February : 

The Oracle ( Montgomery, Ala.) , The Cen- 
tralian, The Artisan, The Wyndonian, The 
Lotus, The B. H. S. Tatler, The Electron, The 
High School Banner, The Roman, The Sangra 
The X-Ray, The Optimist ( Bloomington, 
Ind.) , The Student (Brazil, Ind.) , The Budget, 
The Topic, The Elgin High School Mirror, 
The Academian, New Trier Echoes, The Rail 
Splitter, The Tabula, The Lion, The Purple and 
Gray, The Aegis, Boston University Beacon, 
The Imp, The Philomath, The Bon Bon, The 
Hermonite, The Archon, Drury Academe, 
Somerville High School Radiator, Reflector, 
The Brimmer School Magazine, Central High 
News, The World, The Black and Red Review, 
The K. I. Review, The Tattler ( Nashua, N. H.) , 
The News (East Orange, N. J.), The Optimist 
(Newark, N. J.), The Oracle (Plainfield, 
N. J.) , The Billows, Thyme and Lavender, The 
Vindex, The Quarterly Tatler, The Peningian, 
The Clarion, The Quill, The Academic Observer, 
The Rambler, The Student (Rochester, N. Y.), 
The Forum, The Optimist (East Aurora, N.Y.) , 
The Right Angle, The Messenger, The Tatler 
(Kinston, N. C.) , The Mirror (Bethlehem, 
Pa.) , The Mirror (Pratt, Kansas) , The Shamo- 
kin High School Review, The Radnorite, Stevens 
School Review, The Columbian, The Comet, The 
Tatler VEX Paso, Tex.), Maroon and Gray, The 
Virginian, Pasco School Neius, Green and 
Gold. 



Miss Mullikin — "We will, now look at the 
'Semi-Dome of Apse.' 

Brilliant Senior— "Oh, she's in the other 
class." 



Miss Warner — "Now we'll try this new 
dance." 

Little Murray — "Should we use both feet?" 



Cnn) 



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FOR ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS 
LASELL CLUB NUMBER 

"Once a Lasell girl, always a Lasell girl" 
All articles or "bits of gossip" for the Supplement should be sent to the 
Supplement Editor, Lillian M. Packard. 



LASELL 

Written for the New England Reunion 

Lasell, to you again our footsteps turn 

To echo through your dear, familiar halls 

Where every nook some long-past day recalls. 

The red coals in the reading alcove burn 

As warm and bright, as full of fitful gleams 

As those we watched of old with careless gaze, 

Or sought to glimpse the future in their blaze, 

And wove their ruddy gold amid our dreams. 

Below the hill the quiet village street 

Leads white and still. Against the winter skies 

The maple-boughs lace dark; the sunlight lies 

On Weston hills, and beckons to our feet. 

You newer ones, with girlish faces gay 

Who see our footsteps wander to and fro 

Amid your rightful haunts, you cannot know 

Just what our presence means to us today. 

You cannot know, until like us you learn 

Through varied paths of swift-unfolding years, 

Just why our smiles are sometimes dimmed with tears, 

Or what it spells to us who now return. 

You cannot guess, until within our place 

You see your Selves That Were pass eager-eyed 

Through all their dear-loved kingdom by your side, 

And sudden meet their question, face to face. 

Oh Selves That Were, and Selves We Meant To Be, 

With wistful eyes we see your footsteps pass, 

Or watch with you, as in a mirror-glass 

The swiftly-changing scenes of memory. 

Lasell, the Selves We Are come now to you. 

Their failures and mistakes within their hands, 

To find in you a judge that understands, 

And weighs us by those things we meant to do. 

For you, who knew us then, each hope, each dream, 

Each eager longing, each dim-wrought desire 

On spring-touched campus, or by winter fire, 

Will know us still, and catch perchance a gleam 

Of gold amid the fabric we have spun; 

And whisper low "For every shy intent, 

For every shining deed of worth you meant. 

Dear, wistful-homing child of mine, well done!" 

Martha Haskell Clark, '05. 



DR. BRAGDON'S MESSAGE 

A few words from the letter from California 
to the New England "Home Gathering." 
Dear "Girls," 

I'd give ten cents to be with you today but 
ten cents will hardly do. I suppose a time 
comes when you get tired of being called 
"girls" but remember it is a bit of the old 
times that are precious to your old Principal. 
Into each life with its joy and sorrow, with 
its trials and victories I pray the blessing of 
Him "who maketh rich and addeth no sor- 
God bless you every one in body and 
in basket and in store now and ever. 
Your friend, 

C. C. Bragdon. 
See that the list of those present is 
in the Leaves then I can read it over slowly and 
have a little visit with each one. 



row. 
in sou 



P. S. 



LASELL CLUBS 

Since the appearance of THE SUPPLE- 
MENT in December three Lasell Clubs have 
held their annual luncheons, the New York 
Club, February sixth, reported in the last 
number of the Leaves, the New England 
luncheon, February eighth, under the aus- 
pices of the Lasell Alumnae Association, and 
the Southern California Lasell Club luncheon 
at Hotel Hollywood, Pasadena, Cal., March 2. 



LASELL LEAVES 



181 



ANNUAL HOME GATHERING 

The annual mid-winter Reunion and Lunch- 
eon under the auspices of the Lasell Alumnae 
Association was held at Lasell, February 
eighth. There was the usual gathering to- 
gether of classmates and friends and the 
familiar inquiries of girls and their families. 
They began to arrive about twelve o'clock 
and soon the halls began to hum with the 
chatter and squeals from old girls meeting 
old girls. About twelve-thirty Dr. and Mrs. 
Winslow, Miss Potter, Miss ter Kuile, Miss 
Packard, Miss Blaisdell, Miss Nutt and Prof. 
Hills formed in line and the reception proper 
began. The guests were presented by an 
able body of ushers. After the girls had been 
registered and tagged, luncheon was served 
and the guests of honor led the old girls down 
to the dining room. The tables were beauti- 
fully decorated and a delicious luncheon was 
served through the courtesy of Dr. Winslow. 
At each place was a place card and a dainty 
blue and gold nut basket made and pre- 
sented by Miss Ransom. 

The Lasell Glee Club favored us with a few 
selections which met with hearty applause. 
At the close of the luncheon Mrs. Martin 
entered the dining-room and as she entered 
she was greeted with "Something good is 
surely coming." 

Miss Packard then took charge of the pro- 
gram. She gave a very witty and unique 
introduction to each speaker. The first 
toast was "Given to Hospitality" by 
Dr. and Mrs. Winslow. This was called 
the "Bread and Butter" toast as it sym- 
bolized hospitality. Dr. Winslow responded 
first by a few words and then requested Mrs. 
Winslow to speak. She said she must obey 
the rules of the school and speak when she 
was spoken to. Dr. Winslow spoke of the 
fact that Mrs. Merrick, '56 who sat at his left 
was celebrating her seventy-eighth birthday. 
He gave a cordial invitation to the girls to 
return to Commencement and if they found it 
impossible to send a good representative. 
The second was named "Our Buttered Toast" 



a rich letter from Dr. Bragdon. It contained 
the familiar welcome to the old girls and the 
cordial invitation to "Come and see me." 
The fourth number was "Cream Toast," a 
poem written by Martha Haskell Clarke, '05, 
and read by Maria L. Riker, '09. It was 
a beautiful message. The fifth toast our 
toast-mistress named "Croutons," namely, 
short, crispy snappy pieces of toast. To this 
many girls responded with "choice bits" fa- 
miliar to every girl. Some were "Have you 
your rubbers on?", "Little White Dove," 
"The Black Maria," "One Friday night there 
came to call," "Monday morning I will be 
around to see if your bureau drawers are 
in order." This caused a great deal of fun. 

The sixth toast was a "Club Sandwich." 
Miss Packard said this was made of slices of 
toast with juicy bits between. It contained 
a group of three toasts. Nellie Packard 
Draper, '84 spoke of Lasell Clubs of the past. 
She feared hers was to be called a "dry 
toast." She referred to the S. D. and Lasellia 
Clubs and how they developed the power of 
debating and catering, etc. The fact that 
Lasell girls make such good home-makers and 
club workers shows the good influence of the 
old clubs. Anna Andrews Barris read a paper 
on Lasell girls who are prominent in club life 
today, and gave us an idea of their popularity 
and activity. Etta Stafford Vaughan, '86 
spoke very earnestly and well on "Lasell 
Girls in the future in Club Work." At this 
time Julia ter Kuile, TO, our guest of the day 
brought us the greetings from the New York 
Club of which she is president. The next 
toast was "Swei-bach" (baked twice) on 
Friendships. This was an original poem written 
by Maude Simes Harding, '06, but as she was 
unable to be present on account of illness, 
her loyal message was read by Mrs. F. F. 
Davidson. 

Josephine Woodward, '10 made a few re- 
marks on the interest of the Rally Committee 
for next Commencement. It is requested that 
each graduate appear in her gown with silk 
ribbon bands in class colors hanging from the 



182 



LASELL LEAVES 



shoulders. Each class must notify the com- 
mittee of their color scheme in plenty of time 
so that the committee may see to it that there 
are no two classes alike. 

The last toast but not the least was called 
"Left-Overs." The leader referred to the 
habit in many families of the Sunday night 
luncheon when in addition to the toast and 
tea the pantry is searched for the delicious 
"left-overs." Miss Potter was asked to give 
this home touch to this home-gathering in this 
home school. She gave us a beautiful message 
in her loving manner. She spoke of the school 
spirit of today — how girls gave up their 
presents to each other at Christmas time and 
raised two hundred dollars for the war fund. 
She gave a few happy incidents of the Winslow 
children. She also read a message written by 
a girl now at Lasell "To a Mother." This was 
very impressive and made us realize what our 
mother's place is in the family circle. 

Our gratitude is due to the chairman of the 
committee, Jessie Joy Macmillan, '82, for the 
attention given to details which made the 
gathering a success. 

Miss Benson, the leader of the Glee Club, 
sang in closing the stanzas of a new song 
written by Mrs. Ellen W. Palmer (here in '67) 
to the tune of "Fair Harvard" and we joined 
in the chorus. 

Oh, memories rare, oh, memories dear, 
And sweeter than all the rest, 
Are the hours that we passed in our dear old Lasell 
With the friends that were truest and best. 
Oh our beloved Lasell, our beloved Lasell, 
Oh the days of our dear old Lasell 
Though we wander and roam far away from our home 
We'll be true to our loved Lasell 

Irene S. Sanford, '06, 

Secretary pro tern. 

Among those present were : 

Dr. and Mrs. G. M. Winslow, Fannie Gray 
Merrick, '56, Caroline Spear, '57, Angeline C. 
Blaisdell, '67, Lillie Rose Potter, '80, Jessie 
J. Macmillan, '82, Lillian M. Packard, '83, 
Nellie Packard Draper, '84, Mary Etta Rose 
Green, '86, Etta Stafford Vaughn, '86, Mary 
Lulie Hogg, '88, Mary P. Witherbee, '92, 



Harriett G. Scott, '94, Mabelle H. Whitney, 
'03, Barbara Vail Bosworth, '05, Leslie White 
Ailing, '05, Irene Sauter Sanford, '06, Doro- 
thea Turner Moulton, '06, Agnes E. Bullard, 
'08, Grace T. Griswold, '08, Maria L. Riker, 
'09, E. Mildred Snyder, '10, Julia M. ter 
Kuile, '10, Josephine L. Woodward, '10, 
Mildred V. Goodall, '10, Mary Cornelia Stone, 
'10, Grace Harvey Hall, '11, Doris H. Powers, 
'11, Kathleen M. Knight, '11, Rosalthe C. 
Williams, '12, Ethel Moore, '12, Mildred J. 
Hall, '12, Dorothea C. Africa, '12, Ruth Coulter 
Bierer, '12, Dorothy Fink, '13, Mildred G. 
Westervelt, '13, Mary A. Fenno, '13, Eliza- 
beth H. Linn, '13, Mabel C. Jones, '14, Elsie 
Lloyd Doleman, '14, Evelyn Schmidt, '14 
Eunice Vo taw, '14, Marie Klenze, '14, Blanche 
Ford Hill, Edith F. Totten, Ruth Thatcher, 
Sophie A. Wendt, Anna Andrews Barris, 
Mildred L. Shaw, Bertha Sleicher Davis, 
Eleanor E. Smith, Emma F. Barker, Lucy 
Dudley Merrill, Elizabeth Farnham, Violet 
Irene Wellington, Mary Dodge Whittemore, 
Mary Wales Smith, Bernice E. Wood, Martha 
Keith, Grace Tirrell Poole, Esther Bridg- 
man Lane, Minnie Strickland Whitney, Marian 
H. Nevius, Helen Case Jones, Grace Douglass 
Murray, Evelyn N. Cheney, Elizabeth Bailey, 
Gladys Davis, Hattie Greenleaf Smith, Marion 
Stevens, Elizabeth Hazelet, Mary Colby Wal- 
worth, Alice Taylor Potter, Marjorie Davis, 
Lucia Parcher Dow, Annie C. Gallagher, 
Carre Fuller Eldridge, Minnie Ransom Wag- 
ner, Eleanor Perry Rand, Miriam N. Loomis, 
Prof. J. A. Hills, Adaline Allen Davidson. 



TO LASELL FRIENDSHIPS! 

Written for the New England Lunchzon 

Perhaps you've never noticed 

That in a garden here, 

There grows the rarest kind of plant 

Which blossoms all the year! 

Like mangroves and great banyans, 

Its roots are numberless, 

Yet it is very tiny, 

And hides its comeliness 

Lest it should chance discovery 

By one who might not know 

The secret of its blossoming, 

And why it loves to grow. 

But you can surely find it, 



LASELL LEAVES 



183 



And if your heart hears well, 

A message truly wonderful 

This little plant will tell. 

'I grow because you love me," 

The whisper seems to rise; 
'I bloom at touch of loving hands; 
'My life-flame never dies. 
'All those who break my blossoms 
'Take, thus, dear friends to hold, 
'And what is separation 
'As memories unfold? 
'Like stalks of lotus broken, 
'Still firmer fibres bind 
'When absence takes from me a flower. 
'Return a lovelier one shall find! 
'Once you have known this garden, 
'Forever, 'til life ends 
'It is for you a sacred place: 
'Here grew your schooltime friends. 
'The instinct of affection 
'Youth's Summer doth inspire 
'Keep loyally, oh, friend of mine 
'To cheer the Winter fire! 
'For nowhere, tho' you wander 
'In search of love and mirth, 
'Lies any soil so fertile 
'As this of friendship's birth. 
'Of friendship's deepest treasures 
' You know, and spoken word 
'Is not to be used freely 
'Where wondrous depths are stirred! 
'Perhaps too much I've whispered! 
'Consider all unsaidl 
"Twas but your memory moving 
'Within your heart, instead!" 

Maude Simes Harding, '06. 



THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LASELL 

CLUB 

The Southern California Lasell Club gave 
its ninth annual luncheon at Hotel Hollywood 
(in Hollywood which is one of the beautiful 
suburbs of Los Angeles and really in L. A.) 
on March second. 

Well, we did have a splendid meeting! 
Many said it was the best ever! A fine spirit 
of comraderie prevented any stiff, cliquey 
feeling and every single body had a good 
time. The President was a little undignified 
perhaps but the rest of us forgave him that 
in view of his real delight at seeing his girls 
again. 

The table was beautifully decorated. The 
feast was delicious — everything served hot 
(except the ice-water and ice-cream) which 
isn't always the case at banquets and the 
girls looked so handsome and were so jolly! 

This Hotel Hollywood is the nicest, homiest, 
cleanest, best-managed in every way of all 



the Los Angeles hotels — first-class people 
stay here months, some all the year 'round. 
It is half an hour by trolley from the center 
of Los Angeles and a five cent fare. 

Besides the resident members we were glad 
to have with us, Ina Scott Bryant, '01, from 
Amarillo, Texas, Joel Lapowski Dillon, '03, 
formerly from Texas, Esther Starr of Deca- 
tur, 111., and Marion Gibbons of Roslindale, 
Mass. Ina Scott has Mr. Bryant and her 
three children with her and says she hopes not 
to go back to Texas. We hope the same. Also 
Joel is with her mother and sister Evelyn L. 
Hayne with her little one and we are expecting 
they will settle here. Esther Starr is with her 
mother and living near her brother, a resi- 
dent of Hollywood, so why shouldn't they 
become residents, too? Marion Gibbons is 
visiting and perhaps the only hopeless one of 
the four, but who can tell? That is the 
fashion here — people come for a week or a 
month and before you know it, have settled 
here! Mrs. La Fetra was teacher of mathe- 
matics at Lasell in 1873 and preceptress part 
of the year. It was at her school in Chili 
that our dear Miss Farwell was teacher of 
Art for some years. Mildred Johnston has a 
Montessori school in Pasadena (closed 
temporarily for measles!) and we expect her 
to abide. Rhoda Porter is one of our latest 
comers being settled with her brother on 
Juanita Av., in Covina near Lillian Douglass. 
We missed several who have been constant 
attendants at our luncheons but they doubt- 
less had good reasons. Dr. Winslow's tele- 
gram of Greeting was gratefully received and 
an answer ordered. The N. Y. telegram and 
that from the Mid-winter Reunion were read 
and welcomed. Officers for the coming year 
are: C. C. Bragdon, President; Cora Cogswell, 
Vice President; Laura Chase, Secretary and 
Anita Wade Ambrose, Treasurer. The Treas- 
urer's report showed a good balance in the 
treasury and all hills paid. There were 
present: 

Dr. C. C. Bragdon, Pasadena, Mrs. C. C. 
Bragdon, Pasadena, Mrs. Virginia Johnson 



184 



LASELL LEAVES 



Milbank, Los Angeles, Miss Cora Cogswell, 
Los Angeles, Miss Elizabeth Lum, Whittier, 
Miss Mildred Johnston, Pasadena, Miss 
Jeanette Kiser, Pasadena, Miss Lillian Doug- 
lass, Covina, Miss Rhoda Porter, Covina, 
Mrs. May Church Cottle, Los Angeles, Mrs. 
Bertha Gray Richards, Los Angeles, Mrs. 
Emilie Kothie Collins, Los Angeles, Mrs. 
Anita Wade Ambrose, Los Angeles, Mrs. 
Caroline Thomson Moore, Los Angeles, Mrs. 
Adelaide Widfield La Fetra, Los Angeles, 
Mrs. Kate Wheldon Plumb, So. Pasadena, 
Miss Adele Roth, Pasadena, Miss Ellen Chase, 
Los Angeles, Miss Laura Chase, Los Angeles, 
Miss Margie Schuberth, Pasadena, Miss Joel 
Lapowski Dillon, Los Angeles, Miss Esther 
Starr, Decatur, 111., Mrs. Ina Scott Bryant, 
Amarillo, Texas, Miss Flora Joannes, Pasa- 
dena, Miss Caroline Hill, Los Angeles, Miss 
Rachel H. Field, Los Angeles, Miss Marion 
Gibbons, Roslindale, Mass., Mrs. Isabelle 
Bowers Church, Los Angeles, Mrs. Belle 
Bragdon Barlow, Pasadena. C. C. B. 



LASELL GIRLS AS HOME BUILDERS 

This is the second in our series under this 
topic. This is a portion of an article that 
appeared in the Country Life in America in 
July, 1913, but it has come into our hands only 
recently. It is the home of and is written by 
Martha Stone Adams which many of us re- 
member very pleasantly. 

The Beginning of a House and Garden 

We said to our architect; "There are six 
prime essentials that we will insist upon 
in the building of this house. It must have 
the maximum of light and ventilation con- 
sistent with good looks; it must have a low, 
squat, rambling appearance — a sort of humble 
love-in-a-cottage effect, with an absolute 
lack of show or f reakishness ; it must be 
square without looking square; it must have 
a hospitable looking front door; a fireplace 
large enough to take in four-foot cord-wood 
lengths, so the fire will do the sawing, and the 
fireplace chimney must not smoke. The rest 
we will leave to you." 



When the plans were approved, he said we 
had given him the hardest task he had ever 
undertaken; 

The first exterior sketch did not meet with 
our approval. The decided horizontal second- 
story roof line did not conform to our wishes 
for a low, squat effect, and was therefore 
rejected. The second sketch came surprisingly 
near the mark, but the lines seemed too sym- 
metrical. The third sketch met with our 
approval by allowing the second story to be 
four feet narrower than the first story, two 
feet at each end, thus permitting a somewhat 
lower roof slant to the front gables, the east 
one being lowered considerably, relieving the 
stiff pair effect in the second sketch. 



.—^ 





- 



,:SM 



The house has ten rooms. Seven are on 
the south, overlooking a hundred and forty 
acre golf course of the Omaha Field Club. 
The exterior color scheme is in modulated 
tones of brown, the brick of the basement 
and first story supplying the keynote to the 
whole composition. Harmonizing with this, 
the second-story trim, sash, and stucco dash- 
work are in varying shades of brown and 
tan. The first-story trim and sash are white, 
adding strength, we believe, by emphasizing 
the pedestal effect of the brickwork, for we 
have always imagined that strength denotes 
beauty. The bricks are laid in Flemish 
bond, with dark brown mortar and a deep 
raked joint to give shadow effect and add tex- 
ture to the wall. 

The living-room is finished in mahoganized 
birch, with beamed ceiling, cornice, and wain- 



LASELL LEAVES 



185 



scoring, the latter being one-third the height 
of the room. Glazed doors open into both the 
sun room and hall from the living-room. 

The dining-room is done in quarter-sawed 
oak, with light brown stain and wax finish. 
There is a wide cornice, built-in buffet, and 
paneling two-thirds the height of the room. 
French doors open from the hall and out on 
the screened dining-porch, which is as readily- 
accessible from the kitchen as the regular 
dining-room. 

The hall and stairway are the same finish 
as the dining-room. The entire first and second 
stories are floored in one and a quarter inch 
quarter-sawed oak excepting the floors of the 
kitchen, pantries, and back entry, which are 
maple. 

On the second floor there are five bedrooms 
of good size, and a screened sleeping-porch. 
Three of the bedrooms are finished in white 
enamel, one in mahoganized and one in wal- 
nut stained birch. Both the sleeping and 
dining-porches being on the west, protect 
that side of the house from the hot west sun, 
but having south openings and wooden drop 
curtains, are cool and comfortable. On the 
second floor there are three lavatories and a 
bathroom, linen and broom closets, etc. 

The third story contains a well finished 
maid's room with private bath, two large 
plastered storage rooms and storage closets. 



* * 



Of course, the garden includes the lawn and 
all that goes with it. While the house was in 
course of completion, we attempted without 
professional advice or previous experience, to 
superintend the grading, sloping, terracing, 
and planting of our acre and a half of ground 
of uneven and irregular surface. We were 
warned, but thought we knew, so did not heed. 

* * * * * 

In the fall of 1909, we began all over again, 

and actually plowed up the whole grounds. 

We were now working under the guidance of 

an experienced gardener, and a consulting 

landscape architect.' The terraces were 



changed to slopes of gently flowing outline, 
giving the effect of greater extent to the lawn 
and adding to the naturalness of the planting- 
scheme. 

Considerable thought was given to the 
grouping and arrangement of the trees and 
shrubbery in the natural style. It was sought 
to soften and minimize the effect of height to 
the slopes, and while there are doubtless many 
shortcomings, we believe there never was or 
ever will be a perfect landscape plan. We 
think there is such a thing as artistic confusion 
and "magnificent imperfection." 

Each season we keep adding more plants, 
but try to follow the original plan. Most of 
our additions have been herbaceous peren- 
nials, placed among the shrubbery in incon- 
spicuous places, and we delight in tucking the 
annuals in around the borders. 

Had we only sought a guiding hand in the 
very beginning, we would have gained a year's 
time, and saved much tribulation. 



MY EXPERIENCES IN EUROPE 

Written by request by Marion Shinn, '11 
We sailed from Philadelphia to Liverpool, 
visited the quaint old town of Chester, and 
coached through the English and Scottish 
lake districts. 

"Coaching's fine sport 
// your legs are good 
And your breath's not short!" 
At both Glasgow and Edinburgh the King's 
presence interfered decidedly with our plans. 
All trains were off schedule, no street cars 
running and all buildings and places of in- 
terest closed to the public. In Edinburgh we 
greatly enjoyed a performance of "Rob Roy," 
in Scotch so broad as to be almost unintelli- 
gible to some of our party. The twilight lasts 
till ten o'clock and the play began at seven so 
that the audience could go home while it was 
still light. 

Then followed five days' sight-seeing in 
London and its vicinity and five days in 



186 



LASELL LEAVES 



Paris. "We did several miles of canvases" 
in the Louvre, and I was more than pleased 
when we finally located "Hera of Samos." 

We saw the beautiful city of Brussels, in 
gala attire, on their national holiday. Our 
stay was so short that we had to miss the 
floral parade, though we saw the flower- 
covered autos going up to form in line. The 
fine-looking, beautifully dressed women and 
handsome soldiers in full uniform little 
dreamed of the suffering so soon to be theirs. 

At the Hague we encountered a street-car 
strike! We visited the Peace Palace and other 
places of interest. It rained most of the time 
we were in Holland, with the exception of a 
couple of hours during the Vollendam and 
Marken trip, when all camera enthusiasts 
were very busy. We wondered how such big 
men could sleep in built-in-beds, which were 
only four feet and six inches long. In Am- 
sterdam we went to a diamond factory and a 
museum containing many Rembrandts and 
Van Dycks. 

July 27th, after a visit to the wonderful 
Cologne Cathedral we learned that war was 
threatened between Austria and Servia. Un- 
til late that night we heard the men singing 
"Die Wacht am Rhein" and cheering be- 
tween the verses. The next morning we took 
the express boat from Cologne to Biebrich. 
Soldiers guarded every bridge and one mem- 
ber of our party remarked that the watch on 
the Rhine was right on the job. We learned 
later that this was the last express boat. After 
that the passengers went as far as they could, 
and then stayed all night at some village, 
continuing the next day. 

We were so interested in the vineyards and 
in the castles, which had been destroyed by 
the French years ago, the Mausturm and the 
beautiful national monument. I always 
thought that the Lorelei was a big rock, out 
in the middle of the stream, so I was much 
surprised to find that it was a good-sized hill 
of rocks and trees but quite fast to the bank. 
The current is so treacherous that an extra 
pilot came on board to take us safely by. 



At Wiesbaden we went up a mountain in a 
cable-car and walked down to the Kurhaus 
and to the Kochbrunnen which bubbles up 
from the earth boiling hot. I didn't care much 
for the taste of it. It was in Wiesbaden that 
I gave directions — in my very best German 
for mending my rubber-soled shoe, and it was 
returned, carefully mended with a piece of 
automobile tire. After that I had tire-trouble. 

On the way to Heidelberg we saw soldiers 
everywhere, guarding bridges and tunnels, 
some cavalry and artillery and some heavy 
guns being moved. We went through Heidel- 
berg Castle and when we reached the Uni- 
versity the street looked like an ant-hill. 
Men would run to look at a bulletin, clap 
another man on the shoulder and then run on. 




BULLETIN BOARDS AT HEIDELBERG 

Two motormen became so excited that there 
was a head-on collision of their street-cars. 
The young men were intensely excited, but 
the older men and the women looked very 
grave and many of the women were crying. 
We sent our courier to read the bulletin. It 
was the order for mobilization. That night 
fully two thousand men marched past our 
hotel singing "Die Wacht am Rhein," and 
led by a tall man in a long black cloak. They 
went into the public square and we could hear 
one man making a speech which was con- 
tinually interrupted by cries of "Hoch, hoch, 
hoch." Then they marched back singing 



LASELL LEAVES 



187 



"Deutschland, Deutschland uber Alles," 
and the hannony Avas wonderful." 

When we left early the next morning, two 
soldiers crossed their bayonets and examined 
our tickets before we could enter the station. 
Two hours after we passed through Basel the 
line was closed to regular traffic. 

We arrived in Luzerne at seven P.M. That 
night the lake looked like a big drop curtain— 
the snow-capped mountains in the moonlight, 
the big boats with their red, white and green 
lights and the little row boats with Japanese 
lanterns. 

The next day the Swiss troops mobilized 
and all afternoon the men marched silently 
through the streets. This was August first, 
the Swiss national holiday, but because of 
mobilization all the fireworks and all celebra- 
tions were called off and later even dancing 
was forbidden. We took a trip on the Four 
Canton Lake of Wilhelm Tell fame and walked 
over the quaint wooden bridge with their 
unique pictures. Of course, we went to see 
the Glacier Gardens and the Lion of Luzerne. 
I had always read that the lion was carved 
out of a natural rock but I thought it would be 
merely a boulder and not as big as the side of 
a house. 

"Cooks" shut their doors and refused to 
cash any checks and the Hamburg American 
office bore a sign, "Ferme, geschlossen, 
closed." 

There were more soldiers with bayonets 
at the station. The trip from Luzerne to In- 
terlaken was wonderful — up-grade most of the 
way — and we now understood the expression 
"toy Swiss villages." 

While attending a mass-meeting of English 
speaking people I discovered Mr. Organ 
Orphian Dunham two seats away! We asked 
each other for news of Miss Potter, and her 
party. Mr. Piano Dunham, I learned, was 
also among the missing. 

At Interlaken the Americans were like one 
big family stopping each other on the street 
to exchange views on everything in general. 
(We had had no English newspapers for five 



days) . We stood in line for over an hour to 
get our American Express checks cashed, as 
the bank was a small one and not prepared 
for such a drain. The proprietor of our hotel 
left for the frontier, taking the bus-horses with 
him and we walked to the station, while our 
luggage was trundled along beside us. It was 
at Interlaken that we saw the first of the 
Italian refugees leaving Germany. The Swiss 
people fed them and allowed them free trans- 
portation through Switzerland to Italy. 

We stayed eleven days in Montreux, at a 
lovely place on the lake-front and not far from 
the Castle of Chillon with its famous fifth 
pillar. We tried to attend a performance of 
Wilhelm Tell in the out-of-doors theatre both 
at Interlaken and Montreux, but the mobiliza- 
tion had taken the principal actors. The big 
milk chocolate factories were closed for lack 
of men. Hotels everywhere were closing as 
the men had gone to the border and the women 
had to go home to help gather the harvests 
now ripe in the fields. But through it all the 
Swiss people thought of the strangers within 
their gates and we had the same excellent food 
without any advance in rates. 

It was in Montreux that we fondly cherished 
fourteen cents for three days. We had checks 
and we had credit, but fourteen cents in 
actual cash. We went to the Kursaal every 
night as the orchestra was a fine one and the 
admission was included in our hotel bill but 
we walked the mile and a half each way. 
English papers nine and ten days old were read 
as eagerly as the postscript editions and night 
extras at home. It took six days for a tele- 
gram to come through from London. Soldiers 
patroled the lake-front continually. In the 
middle of the night one clap of thunder rolled 
and echoed among the mountains, causing 
much consternation as some of the guests 
thought it was cannons on the French border. 
Every window had its little balcony and every 
balcony a wash line stretched across. Even 
the men did their own washing. 

{To be continued in April Leaves) 



188 



LASELL LEAVES 



LASELL STUDENTS 

Will Make No Mistakes 
In Depending Upon 

New England's 
Greatest Store 

FOR THEIR VARIOUS NEEDS 



Here one may choose from 

unequaled assortments of 

Clothing Furnishing Rugs Pictures 

Artwares Trunks and Luggage 

and the many other things so frequently 
needed during college days 



Best of all, selection here is never from 
commonplace stock but from the best that 
Europe and America can produce 



Jordan Marsh Company 



BOSTON 



Stylish — High Quality 

fflimtf &uttg 

$19.50 to $85.00 




Cfjanbler & Company 

151 Fremont Street, poston 



LASELL LEAVES 



189 



Order by Mail 

Washable 

CORDUROY SKIRTS 

With Patch Pockets and Wash- 
able Bone Buttons. Stylish 
and Practical. Just the thing 
for any out of door sport as 
well as in-door wear. They 
come in white and colors. 

One Style for $3.75 an d another at $5.50 
According to quality of the Corduroy. 

C. F. Hovey Company 

Summer, Chauncy and Avon Streets 
BOSTON, MASS. 



The Plastic Shoe 




(Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 




In Low or High Cut 
and also in Pumps 



The Plastic Shoe 
is the result of 30 
years of study in 
the search for a 
shoe that will help 
all foot troubles and 
still retain a grace- 
ful appearance. 

The Plastic Shoe 
assists one to walk 
as nature intended. 
It removes the 
strain and ache 
resulting from walk- 
ing or standing in 
ill fitting shoes. 



Thayer, McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



fi 


When You Visit Lasell Stop at 


NYE PARK INN 


46 GROVE STREET 


Between the Seminary and Station 


AUBURNDALE, MASS. 


FIRE PROOF GARAGE 



190 



LASELL LEAVES 



CHINA AND GLASS 

The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in this line 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glass 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits every season by our buyers to the 
best makers in Great Britain. France, Germany, Austria and Amer- 
ica. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS Gallery 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

FRANKLIN, COR. HAWLEY ST., BOSTON 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 

Compliments of 
GEO. J. BARKER LUMBER CO. 



WALTHAM, MASS. 

George C. Folsom 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 

W. F. HADLOCK 
Newsdealer and Stationer 

Developing and Printing 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CAPODANNO & ALBANO 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco. 

331 AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Tel. Con. 

C. A. DONOVAN 

345 AUBURN STREET AUBURNDALE 

Ladies' and Men's Furnishings 
Dry Goods and Small Wares 

ELLIOTT W. KEYES 
PHARMACIST 
Drugs- Medicines-Chemicals-Choice Confections 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 



HAYDEN 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 

College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 




COTTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 
CAPS and GOWNS 

to the American Universities and 
Colleges, to Lasell Seminary and 
scores of other Academies 

CLASS CONTRACTS A 
SPECIALTY. 

PULPIT and CHOIR GOWNS. 



Dewton Ice Company 

MILLER BROS. 



Addr2£! ce Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 



PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Receipts 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 PORTLAND STREET, BOSTON 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for Price List of over 60 kinds 



CARDS AND GIFTS 

The New <Slioj3 

149 TREMONT ST., ROOM 923, BOSTON, MASS. 

Waists and Dresses Made at Low Prices 
WAISTS $3.50 DRESSES $8.00 & $10.00 

C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 
Mu&it dealers 

Announce their Removal to 

2B Park Street, Boston. Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Three doors above their old store. Send for our recent 
catalogues. Mail orders filled the same day as received. 
Music sent on selection if desired. 




LASELL LEAVES 



191 



SCHOOL 
STATIONERY 



Note Books 

Students' Paper 
Fountain Pens, etc. 



Engraved and Printed 



Programs 



Invitations 



Dance Orders 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON 7 SQUARE 

BOSTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 686 Haymarket 



SPORT COATS 

MACKINAWS 

SERGE MIDDY SUITS 



SPECIALTIES 

FOR 

COLLEGE GIRLS 



Send for Illustrated Booklet 

Henry S. Lombard 

22 to 26 Merchants Row 
BOSTON, MASS. 




Ladies are delighted 

with the results of using Camp- 
bell's Stain on Floors, Furni- 
ture and Woodwork. 

Gives superb finish, brings out 
the natural grain of the wood. 
Write for color card 

Carpenter-Morton Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Established 1882 



Incorporated 1904 



GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Coatumerg 

6 Boylston Place, Boston, Mass. 

College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Oxford 145 



Jfflaugusf 
$rmttng 
Company 

Jflasteacljuserrs 



192 LASELL LEAVES 



Telephones Haymarket 2311-2312 



Flowers 
of Quality 



HOUGHTON -GORNEY CO. 

:-: Florists :-: 



119 TREMONT STREET, 

[Park Street Church] 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Specialty 

Flower Shop of Boston 



FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED TO ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Free Delivery to Lasell 





Is Now 




The ALLERLEI of the Glass of 1915 is now ready lor disttibutioii. 
As only a limited edition has been printed* it is eartt^tty requ 
you p ace your order at once with Bess Emerine- 

This book is the best that has ever been published by a"cla- 
Lasell. It contains 188 pa£es and nearly 300 illustrations. 

The price is $2.00. Postage 25 cents ex 



L. P. HOLLANDER GO. 

2 02 Boylston Street 
Boston 

The New Spring Designs hi 
DRESSES, SlIITS, COATS 
and MILLINERY 

are, beginning to arrive, and shot i ! 
prove interesting tip girl w I 

takes pride in her pers^= 
fcnce. 



Orders by mall will receive prompt 
and careful attention. 



When iii Boston 

Lunch at the 

GQNSIGNOR^S UNION 

■J 5 Tempi 



Advertise 

lit the 
LEAVES 



TWO STUDIOS 



164 
TREMONT 
STREET 
Telephone Ox- 
ford 2687 




Kait photo gF 



Q/t/cm(jfiamphm,^top. 




RT in relation to PORTRAIT 
PHOTOGRAPHY is the 

realization of beauty, grace and 
intelligence, as expressed in the finished 
portrait. 

Our advanced 1915 styles we honestly believe 
will appeal to you. Special discount rates to 
all Lasell Students. 



161 

TREMONT 

STREET 

Telephone 

Oxford 858 



Our Stock Never Gets Old 




41 



SUMMERS! 



WHOLESALE 
<& RETAIL 



CHARGE 

ACCOUNTS 

OPENED 



NEW GOODS ARRIVE EVERY DAY 


Diamonds 


Vanity Cases 


Watches 


Photo Frames 


Silver Goods 


Leather Goods 


Combs 


Fountain Pens 


Cut Glass 


Brass Goods 


Coral Jewelry 


Chafing Dishes 


Roman Pearls 


Percolators 


Ebony Goods 


Parisian Ivory 



Our Watch and Jewelry Repair Departments do 
the best work at very low prices 

MR. F. F. DAVIDSON 
AUBURNDALE 




LASELL LEAVES 



193 



A. SHUMAN & CO. 



The Service Store, Boston 



Tailored Apparel for 
College Girls of 
Rare Distinction 



Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabrics — 

Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 

Splendid Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

13 V£ Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



We Can Please You 

Come and See for Yourself 

Dry Goods, Small Wares, Dress Goods, Silks, 
Velvets, Linings, Laces, Gloves, Ribbons, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Hosiery, Underwear, Millinery,Cloth- 
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description. 



P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-135-137-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 



PIANO COLLE CTIONS 

HELM 

'SYLVAN SKETCHES" 

60c. 
LIND 

"THE SILENT MERE" 

60c. 
MESSAGER 

"DANCE SUITE" 

60c. 

PUBLISHED BY 

Cbe Boston music Company 



26 and 28 A. BOS ION, 

WEST ST. /W^y MASS 

TELEPHONE OXFORD 1561 



194 



LASELL LEAVES 



NEARLY A CENTURY IN 

CARPETS AND RUGS 

Few concerns in this country have so long a business 
record and none in Floor Coverings. 

A large, well selected stock, shown by experienced 
salesmen and the same methods that won the respect and 
patronage of parents and grandparents we believe will 
prevail with the present generation. 

Quality considered, it is our purpose not to be under- 
sold by any of our competitors. 

EVERYTHING IN FLOOR COVERINGS 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

646-650 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St. 



Meyer Jonasson & Go 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Waists, Furs and Sweaters 



GARMENTS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 



A SPECIAL FEATURE 




SPRING STYLES 




This new model 
comes in Patent 
Leather or Dull 
Calf with low heel 
and pearl button 
ornament. 

Price $5.50 



10% discount to students and faculty of Lasell. 



160 Tremont Street, Boston 



l^SELL fpAVE5 



DUX FEMINA FACTI" 



Vol. XXXX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., APRIL. 1915 No. 7 

Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston. Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 


LIST OF OFFICERS 


Subscription Editor 


FRANCES HARRIS 


Editor-in-chief 
CAROL RICE 


JESSIE SHEPHERD 


MAUDE HAYDEN 


Associate Editors 
Art Editor 


EDNA CHRISTENSEN 


Local Editor 


EDITH HODGES 


Exchange Editor 


*OSE BAER 

Assistant 


Art Editor, CHARLOTTE 


KATHERINE ALLEN 
WHITING 

Assistant Exchange Editor 




Personal Editor 


MARGARET BELT 


mt Local Editor MARGARET ALLEN 


HELEN MERRILL 


Staff Photographer ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (Including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 

Things Worth While 

Washington Trip {frontispiece) 196 Personal 

Literary 197 Editorial 

Locals 203 Exchanges 



210 
213 
211 

218 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar Inside front cover 

Thomas Long Inside front cover 

A. Shuman&Co. 193 

Pinkham & Smith 193 

P.P.Adams 193 

Schirmer 193 

T. E. Moseley Co. 194 

Meyer Jonasson & Co. 194 

Jonn H. Pray & Sons Co 194 

Chandler&Co. 220 

Jordan Marsh Co. 220 

Thayer, McNeil Co. 221 

C.F.Hovey&Co. 221 

English Tea Room 221 

Nye Park Inn 221 

A. T. Bridges 222 

TheNewShop 222 

C. W. Thompson * 222 

Cottrell & Leonard 222 



W. F. Hadlock r - 222 

Capodanno & Albano 222 

C. A. Donovan 222 

Elliott W. Keyes 222 

Hayden 222 

Newton Ice Co 222 

Geo. J . Barker Lumber Co. 222 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton 222 

George C. Folsom 222 

Damon 223 

H. S. Lombard 223 

Carpenter, Morton 223 

George P. Raymond 223 

Maugus Printing Co. 223 

Houghton-Gorney Co. 224 

Allerlei Inside back cover 

Consignor's Lunch ' Inside back cover 

L. P. Hollander Inside back cover 









tPL 










SCENES FROM THE WASHINGTON TRIP 



START OF A SIGHTSEEING TRIP 
NEWS FROM HOME 
EGG-ROLLING ON THE WHITE HOUSE GROUNDS 



MT. VERNON 

ON THE BUS 

LEAVING THE CAPITOL 




ONLY A GOLF-BALL 

Big Brother was in a great hurry and he 
threw his golf-balls on the first article of 
urniture handy, — this being the big Morris 
chair in the living room. Surely no realiza- 
tion of his carelessness in not putting his 
oalls in their proper place, occurred to him 
or his hurry would have been of far less con- 
sequence. 

Mother kissed Boy good-by and, with a 
final caution to be good, left him and 
lurried off to her club. Boy wondered 
what he should do. Annie was busy and 
lad told him not to bother her. Ah! 
loud whoop had warned him that 
Billy was outside and was calling him to 
}lay ball. The gusty arrival of that in- 
dividual echoed through the hall and in- 
ormed Annie that Boy had found amuse- 
ment. Billy had lost his ball; Boy could not 
ind his; Billy espied the golf-balls of Big 
Brother and suggested that they use them. 
No sooner said than done, and the boys were 
soon out-of-doors playing ball or merely 
shouting, — it was hard to decide which. 

"Gee! look at it bounce!" yelled Billy, 
'Wonder what makes it?" he added. 

Boy, the curious, answered, "Let's find 
out." He pulled his knife from the depths of 
his pocket and, seizing the ball, struck his 
knife in it with all his force. A sharp, sting- 
ing pain in his eyes, and. Boy knew no more. 



"Mother, Mother," his voice rose in an 
agonized wail,— "why can't I see, and what 
makes it hurt so?" 

"There, dear!" soothed mother with tears 
in her own eyes, as she laid a gentle hand 
on the hot little head, swathed in bandages. 
Then as quietly as possible, she told Boy 
that the acid in the golf-ball had injured 
his eyes and that he must be patient a long, 
long time before he could see again. Boy's 
agony and despair at first almost broke his 
mother's heart, but he soon learned to be 
very patient, if only for her dear sake. 

The days grew into weeks, the weeks into 
months and mother began to gain hope from 
her consultations with the great specialist, 
but she dared not tell Boy ; for it was only a 
hope and the disappointment would be too 
keen. Even when the bandages were re- 
moved, the sight would return slowly, so the 
doctor said; but one morning while Boy 
was wrapped in merciful sleep they removed 
the white bandages from the poor eyes, which 
had been sightless for so long a time. 

Boy awoke and sighed, but the expression 
on his face changed as his mother leaned 
over him. "Mother," in a fearful tone," 
"what's this?" and he placed a trembling 
hand on his mother's bracelet-watch. 

"My watch, dear," she answered. 

"Why, mother, I can almost see," and the 



ft 



198 



LASELL LEAVES 



joy in his tone was the sweetest thing his 
mother had heard for many weeks. 

After that, the time passed quickly and 
Boy learned to appreciate the beauty of 
many things, which he had never before 
realized. 

Margaret Allen. 



THE BEST MAN 

( Continued from March Leaves) 

The next evening Anita's aunt was giving 
a dinner party for her niece and her fiance- 
It was there that the best man was to appear 
for the first time. Eugenia looked forward 
to this event more with dread than with 
pleasure. The thought kept running through 
her mind, "A long dull dinner, a long dull 
evening, a dull companion with bright red 
hair, who hates girls." 

As Mr. Bradford was detained by business, 
Eugenia insisted upon waiting for him. It 
was therefore a good half hour before the two 
arrived at the appointed place. She left 
Mr. Bradford in the hall and was shown 
upstairs to remove her wrap. A lovely 
picture she made as, a moment later, she 
glided down the broad stairs in her shimmer- 
ing satin gown; but only two people were 
there to appreciate her lovliness. One was 
Phil, the bridegroom, and the other was the 
best man — the man with the red hair. As 
her eyes rested on him, she stopped suddenly 
and stared. "Could this be the much-discussed 
best man! It couldn't be! This man was 
almost handsome." 

As these thoughts flashed through her 
mind, she became conscious of hearing a 
formal introduction, but not until she heard 
the words, "best man, Mr. Burton" did she 
fully realize who he was. Bewilderment and 
indignation flitted across her face, but a 
brilliant smile quickly followed, as she shook 
hands with him. 

"Pardon me, Miss Powers, but you acted 
as though you had seen me before," said Hal 
Burton, looking questioningly at her. 



"Only heard of you," and she flashed an- 
other smile at him. 

The dinner proved to be far more enter- 
taining than Eugenia had anticipated. During 
the first few courses, a great deal of gay laugh- 
ter and a great deal of banter passed 
back and forth among the young people. 

Soon, however, it gave way to more serious 
conversation. Not long did it take the guests 
to discover the interesting talker, Hal Burton. 
They learned that he had been in Turkey 
for the last four years as secretary for the 
American Ambassador. They also learned of 
the advance in civilization the Turks were 
making; of their dogged faith in their Mo- 
hammedan religion; of the Christian element 
that was springing up and gaining such a 
stronghold ; and of the great work the 
American schools and hospitals were accom- 
plishing, in spite of such overwhelming odds. 
As Eugenia listened, she likewise studied the 
speaker. Through his earnest plea for the 
rights and recognition of the Turk, she 
traced an unspoken desire, hidden deep, 
in his heart — it was the secret longing to 
return, at an early date, to Constantinople 
with financial aid, as well as good-will 
from the people of the United States. Eu 
genia was conscious of a steady increase o 
admiration for this strong, splendid man. 

"He has thoughts other than those of the 
average young man of today," she saic 
thoughtfully, to herself. "Bigger things than 
dancing, sports and making money occupy 
his mind. And his red hair really isn't so 
bad," she added. 

After dinner, she managed to corral th 
bridegroom and demand hotly, "Phil," (sh 
already felt at liberty to call him "Phil" 
"what did you mean by telling Anita thai 
Mr. Burton was fat, and that he had brigh 
red hair, and that he was altogether im 
possible? Why, he is handsome!" 

"Of course, he is. But I wasn't going tc 
commit myself. Girls never agree with me 
so I made up my mind no one should be dis 
appointed this time," he explained. "Now 






LASELL LEAVES 



199 



you run over and talk with the young man. 
He looks lonesome." 

"All right," she agreed, "but just one warn- 
ing — I'll never believe another word you say, 
sir!" 

Needless to say, Eugenia did not insist 
upon waiting for Mr. Bradford, who was 
deep in a business discussion when the first 
of the guests started to leave, and only one 
invitation from Hal Burton, as an escort, was 
necessary. On the drive homeward, which 
passed all too quickly, Turkey, its problems, 
and its people, once more was the theme of 
the conversation. 

"I hope I don't bore you, Miss Powers, 
with my continual talk about Turkey. My 
interest often overrules my manners to such 
an extent that I sometimes tire people. 
Pardon me, please, if that has been the case, 
tonight," he begged, swinging the machine 
up to the steps of the Bradford home. 

Eugenia replied very earnestly, "May I 
thank you for all you have told me? It has 
been extremely interesting, so interesting, in 
fact, that I am going to beg you to con- 
tinue the subject whenever we are together." 
As she extended her hand to say good night, 
she glanced up with an impish twinkle in her 
eye and queried, "Why do you hate girls, 
may I ask?" 

"Why do I hate girls!" he repeated in 
blank astonishment. Then, half seriously 
and half jokingly, "Great heavens, I'm crazy 
about all of you." 

Eugenia's last doubts vanished. 

The next two weeks were spent at gay, 
festive parties, dinners and dances. Every 
one enjoyed them immensely and all, except 
the bride and groom, expressd the desire 
that the wedding might not take place for 
another month. But the eventful day finally 
came. Then everyone, including the bride 
and groom, fervently wished that the affair 
had taken place the week before. The whole 
house was in an uproar. Decorators com- 
pletely ruled the house below to the boundary 
line of the kitchen, where the caterers, aided 



by the cook and maids reigned supreme, 
and up-stairs, maids and dressmakers flitted 
to and fro. Telephones rang incessantly; 
door-bells jangled at irregular periods through- 
out the day; and above all could be heard 
Father begging for some lunch and a place 
to sit down. 

The ceremony was over, the reception was 
over, and the dance was just beginning when 
Eugenia heard a certain someone, with red 
hair, say quietly: 

"You don't care to dance, 'Gene. Let's 
break away from this jam and go out for a 
breath of fresh air." 

She said nothing — there was nothing to 
say. She merely followed the guidance of a 
hand on her arm. 

They chose a bench in the garden where 
they had full view of the lovely big home, 
so brilliant in all its bright lights. Through 
the long French windows the soft strains of 
the orchestra floated out, or the murmur of 
voices with now and then a burst of merry 
laughter; they could see the beautifully 
gowned women gliding here and there among 
the throng; and in one corner, they could see 
Mr. Bradford talking, business no doubt, 
with a group of men. 

"In all that mass of people, surely two 
persons could not be missed," they assured 
themselves. And most assuredly, they were 
not missed. Only once was Eugenia's name 
mentioned and it almost died on the speaker's 
lips, so quickly did it pass from her mind. 
It was when the bride threw her bouquet 
among the bevy of girls. Abbie, who was 
standing on the outside of the group, turned 
to Helen and asked, "Where do you suppose 
'Gene is and what can she be doing?" 

"I'm sure I don't know," Helen replied. 

The ever-watchful moon and a little 
croaking frog were the only two who did 
know. Fortunately, the moon was too far 
away to hear what passed between the two 
truants and the frog was a bit too polite to 
come too near. 

"But," he afterwards confided to a frog 



200 



LASELL LEAVES 



companion, "I managed to catch a few words, 
now and then, which had no connection what- 
ever, such as, 'Turkey, a month, honeymoon, 
the last of the four,' and last of all, which 
sounded very queer, ''I just love red hair.'' 

Edna Christen sen. 



HOW THEY MADE VALENTINES 

In one corner of the big, busy school- 
room two little curly heads bent together 
over a very absorbing bit of work. Dainty 
scraps of vari-colored paper, fragments of 
laces from candy-boxes, threads of tinsel and 
narrow ribbon covered the desk in front 
of them and the careless little hands had 
strewn the floor round about with a gay 
motley of shreds and clippings. 

Bobby was working very hard over his 
'Valentine" as it was for "dear muvver." 
There was a liberal sprinkling of small finger- 
prints over the surface, and it would indeed 
be hard to say which would have won the 
most affectionate response from "dear muv- 
ver's" heart the dear little finger-prints or 
the many gaily-colored emblems of love. 
Finally the boy paused a moment, pushed 
the tumbled brown curls from his hot little 
forehead, and waved a sticky red heart, sus- 
pended on one pudgy forefinger, triumphantly 
in the air. "I dot my walentine mos done," 
he announced to the little maiden by his 
side, and therewith deposited the last glow- 
ing symbol in the center of his work of art. 

But his little chum had not fared as well, 
for she had been so interested in the cunning 
bit of a cupid that she was to paste that 
she had stuck him right over one of the 
pretty roses that teacher had painted on the 
cover, and poor Cupid was upside down, too. 
Teacher had consoled her to some degree by 
turning the valentine around and showing 
her what a pretty cap the rose petals made 
for the wee cupid, and Jeanie finally deter- 
mined to try again. 



In a generous moment Bobby had pre- 
sented her with a small gilt dove for her 
valentine. But he had refused to lend her 
further assistance when in her endeavors 
rightly to place the "birdie," she had in- 
cidently pulled off the one remaining and 
very magnificent wing. 

Now to add to her discomfort, it was 
quite necessary to write "For My Valen- 
tine" and a little verse inside the cover; 
but the pencil was unusually mischievous that 
day, and went wandering off in the most un- 
heard of fashion, so that, finally when Bobby 
looked around, Jeanie was trying hard not 
to cry, although the big, blue eyes were very 
teary, one lip caught up very doubtfully, 
and one little fist doubled up hard against 
the flushed cheek. Immediately Bobby's 
warm little heart melted, and he hastily 
pulled forth a diminutive, soiled handker- 
chief and a sticky lollypop, showing rather 
plainly signs of having been previously en- 
joyed. Both his gifts and sympathy, how- 
ever, failed of their purpose, and he was in 
despair, when he caught sight of his own 
precious "walentine" lying neglected on the 
floor. Without a word, but with such a look 
of joy, he snatched it up and thrust it into 
Jeanie's hands. " '00 tan have my dear 
muvver's walentine and I'll make anuzzer 
one," he whispered. 

One big, fat teardrop, that had thought of 
rolling down Jeanie's cheek reconsidered, and 
Jeanie smiled wistfully, "Oh, Bobby, that is 
a booful walentine!" she murmured. Then 
she ecstatically hugged it close and having 
thoughtfully retained the formerly despised 
lollypop, she used it to best advantage while 
Bobby — well Bobby, being quite a little man, 
despite his few years, went courageously to 
work again to make dear "muvver" another 
valentine. 

Marguerite Hall. 



LASELL LEAVES 



201 



THE LURE OF THE SHOPS 

Madison, Ohio., 

March 28, 1915. 
My dear Helen : 

I haven't forgotten, despite my long de- 
lay, the promise I made, to write you about 
a certain pleasant afternoon Barbara and I 
spent in the city one day last December. 

The afternoon on which we had planned 
to go into the city proved to be an ideal one, 
very cold and invigorating, the sun shining 
brightly between intervals of snow flurries, — 
just the sort of day that makes you feel full 
of life and enthusiasm. After the usual 
tiresome journey, we reached Cleveland, and 
immediately started out on our shopping 
expedition. Euclid Avenue was more fasci- 
nating than ever before, with every store 
and shop brilliantly lighted from the very 
top floor to the street, and the display win- 
dows attractively arranged with the newest 
of everything. Dusk had already come al- 
though it was still early and the street lights 
were on as is usual on winter afternoons; 
and, as I looked up that illumined vista I 
thought of that day only one short year 
before, when you and I had walked up Euclid 
Avenue, gazing into the windows as we went, 
and of the purchases we made of those lovely 
things which we could not resist buying. 
Didn't we have fun that afternoon. And will 
you ever forget our eventful ride home? 

On this day as we looked at the brightly 
lighted windows containing such attractive 
feminine finery, each seemed to beckon us in. 
In front of a particularly attractive one filled 
with furs of every description, coats, muffs, 
tippets, what you will — stood two shabbily 
and thinly clad young girls, gazing longingly 
at these soft and lovely furs. Already the 
effects of a life of drudgery and hardship was 
beginning to show in their faces, and I could 
easily picture in my mind the monotonous 
course of their days, — work during all the 
daylight hours in a noisy dingy factory for 
but a small sum, and their return at night, 
tired out, to one or two small bare rooms in a 



tenement-house which they call "home." 
What a lure the shops in all their attractive- 
ness must be to such poor girls was con- 
clusively shown by those two, looking so 
hungrily at the rich, warm furs, which are 
forever just beyond their reach. Do you 
wonder that often there is great bitterness 
felt by such people against those who ride in 
their luxurious motor cars and buy for them- 
selves the most precious and costly of every- 
thing? Nevertheless there is, I am sure, 
almost an equal fascination in the shops for 
these women of the wealthy class as for those 
of the lower social levels, those, who so seldom 
know true comfort. 

The interior of the stores, decorated for the 
approaching holidays, was as attractive as the 
windows had been. Around the balconies 
were hung huge wreaths of green cedar, red 
ribbons, and bells; and on and over the 
counters these Yuletide decorations were 
carried out in every conceivable way, even 
to the boxes on the shelves. Many things 
were pleasingly boxed, already for the pur- 
chaser and the articles thus made to look more 
tempting and appealing. It was a pleasing 
picture, the whole store sparkling with lights. 
Lights, I think, make a shop much more 
alluring. One could easily spend a whole 
day, wandering delightedly, from one de- 
partment to another of one of our big stores, 
at any season, admiring the fascinating things. 
My only regret was my lack of time to spend 
in this way. 

Our first stopping place on this jaunt was 
the jewelry department dressed in all its 
usual magical attractiveness. One of the 
many things that we saw here especially 
appealing to me was a long, narrow, filigree, 
platinum pendant set with diamonds. It 
was just the thing I had been wanting, and 
it did look so irresistible, lying so snugly in 
that soft purple case that I had difficulty in 
refraining from asking the clerk to remove it 
from the case and allow me to examine it. 
Fortunately for father's pocket-book, Bar- 
bara called me and so I had to leave my 



202 



LASELL LEAVES 



charming little new acquaintance resting 
securely in the case; but before leaving I had 
decided what it was I wanted the most for my 
approaching birthday. 

On our way to the fur department we 
passed the ribbon section, and truly I 
never saw such beautiful ribbons! In the 
cases they were arranged most temptingly, — 
bows of all sorts, wide, beautifully flowered 
silk and satin ribbons, brocaded ribbons, 
some brocaded in velvet. You remember 
what a weakness I have for beautiful ribbons. 
I wasn't able to pass by these without buy- 
ing some of a lovely pink brocade for a girdle. 
The best thing for me I fancy, is to walk 
through a store without looking to right or 
left or stopping to admire anything; for 
if I do this, I'm always lured into buying some- 
thing. Barbara, not being able to find here 
what she wanted, we went to a furrier about 
two blocks beyond. This little shop was 
also fascinating, with its rich furnishings, 
and huge palms and poinsettas; the soft sub- 
dued lights completed the picturesqueness. 

The shops here are so generally alluring 
in the beauty of the goods displayed and the 
art with which they are presented to the 
public that it is a little hard to realize how 
very different were the stores of thirty or 
forty years ago, or more, of which our grand- 
mothers tell. The window artist had not 
then appeared to work his magic in the big 
glassed-in enclosures that we call "windows" 
today; nor had the manufacturer then reached 
his present height of artistry and elegance in 
production. 

While Barbara was occupied in making her 
purchase in this especial shop, my attention 
was attracted to a very richly dressed lady 
trying on a gorgeous set of furs, and evidently 
tempted to purchase them. Her own furs 
were lying across a chair nearby, and were, as 
I could plainly see, an exquisite set. She was 
no doubt one of the many who are able to 
buy everything they want without consider- 
ing the extravagance of buying what is 
really not needed. Although this extra 
set of furs was evidently by no%eans a 



necessity for her, she did finally decide to 
take them and I concluded that she too was 
one of the many who yield to the lure of the 
shops. Possibly in the case of the poorer 
classes, who are not able to satisfy their 
similar desire to own whatever tempts them 
to buy, their inability to indulge themselves 
there may result finally in giving them stur- 
dier and firmer character. 

The purchasing done, we looked at our 
watches, discovering that the time had 
passed more quickly than we imagined and 
that we had only ten mintes to make our 
train. The charm of the shops had nearly 
proved disastrous for me that day, for it was 
with difficulty that we succeeded in reaching 
our train just as it was about to leave. So 
much did I enjoy that afternoon that I 
heartily wished that you also could have 
been of the party. 

I am hoping that you can arrange to visit 
us at Easter time. 

Sincerely yours, 

Mariette J 





WASHINGTON TRIP 

Friday April 2 — At five o'clock we had had 
supper and were ready to start. As Miss 
Nutt was not on hand, Miss Potter was at the 
door asking each of us if we had our rubbers 
and umbrellas. On explaining that they were 
either in our suit cases or that we would buy 
some if it rained, we were allowed to go. The 
trip on the boat was perfect. I had always 
heard that Point Judith was very rough; so 
I remained dressed until we should pass it 
as I wanted to see for myself. I didn't con- 
sider it rough a bit although the wind was 
blowing an awful gale. The boat rocked as 
gently as a cradle, yet Norma and Mid 
were glad of Schmidty's sea-sickness remedy. 

April 3 — It began to snow as we left New 
York and when we came to Philadelphia, the 
worst storm of the year was raging. We 
took a sight-seeing bus but we could get very 
little idea of the city. Within the buildings, 
however, things were very calm and we visited 



with interest the Mint and Independence Hall. 
The best part of the day for three of us was 
the luncheon hour which Schmidty, Mid and 
I spent with Dot Payne Whiteway, '14. 

April 4 — Easter Sunday! and we could not 
have wished a better day. In fact it was so 
beautiful that six of us went to early mass at 
Saint Patrick's Church. Immediately after 
breakfast we left for the President's church. 
We all saw him as he left his Pierce Arrow 
limousine but we didn't all get into the church. 
Isabelle stood in the doorway and three of us r 
not getting even that near, went to a neigh- 
boring church. 

This afternoon we went to Arlington where 
we registered in the room of the old mansion 
in which General Lee was married. From 
the front of this house we had a beautiful 
view of Washington. Besides the extensive 
burial place of the known and unknown 
heroes, we saw many places of interest, the 
homes of Washington's wealthiest citzens, 
General Washington's headquarters at George- 



204 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



town, the old residence of Francis Scott 
Keyes. We also crossed the river on which 
Fulton launched the first steam-boat. To- 
night we visited the Congressional Library. 
The marble walls, the decorated walls and 
ceilings, and the mosaic work deserves much 
more time and study than we were able to 
give, we were all so dead tired. 

April 5 — We walked to the National Mu- 
seum, where we spent two hours, seeing things 
among them being the costumes worn by the 
various mistresses of the White House. 
Then we went to the new Smithsonian In- 
stitute where we saw among many other 
specimens, "Teddy's" animals from Africa. 
This afternoon we saw the egg-rolling on the 
White House grounds. The children bring 
their own colored eggs to play ball with or 
roll on the lawn. In order to get in you 
must take a child with you ; so we each found a 
youngster and gave it a dime to go in with us. 
Some children made quite a bit of money dur- 
ing the day by going in with people. After 
leaving the grounds one of the girls went 
shopping while the rest of us went to the Pan- 
American building where a guide told us all 
the points of interest. The most beautiful 
room is the banquet hall pronounced to be 
architecturally perfect in proportions and 
acoustic properties. Other things of beauty 
are the fountain and sunken garden. To- 
night a few lucky girls were invited to the 
new Willard for the Yale-Princeton Glee 
Club concert , while the rest of us were more 
aristocratic and went to movies. 

April 6 — This morning we walked to and 
rode up the monument ; two of the girls walked 
down. Then we visited the state, army and 
navy building. Through the kindness of Mr. 
Joseph Wilson, son of the Secretary of Labor, 
we obtained a pass to see the state dining- 
room, the red, blue and green rooms of the 
White House, besides the rooms usually 
shown to visitors. This afternoon we had a 
delightful trip by water to Mt. Vernon. The 
weather was so warm that we sat on the 
hurricane deck without coats. 



April 7 — To-day we tried to take in the 
capitol. A guide explained to us the bronze 
doors, hall of statues, where we each asked 
what ones were from our state. Montana not 
being represented, Veda promised to see that 
that state send statues when she got home. 
The guide called our attention, also, to the 
paintings in the main hall and in the dome roof 
besides all the other rooms and the echo spot. 
We all stood in a close group over the place, 
where John Quincy Adams fell paralyzed 
while the guide stood in another part, his 
back to us, and whispered. We heard every 
word although people in other parts of the 
room could not hear a syllable. After seeing 
the lower floor several of us climbed to the 
top of the dome, stopping to test the whisper- 
ing gallery on the way up. Before leaving we 
visited the Supreme Court and heard the open- 
ing of a case. The next and last building 
we have visited or could visit, for we leave to- 
morrow, was the Treasury. A little boy was 
our guide and he rattled off figures and de- 
scriptions as learnedly as any man. 

We did not see the stored money but only 
the door which keeps it safe, and as the little 
fellow told us that any tampering with the 
locks would bring enough soldiers from Fort 
Myer in half an hour to completely surround 
the building, we thought we wouldn't try to 
see the money. This afternoon Mrs. Wm. 
Wilson received us. In the line, assisting her, 
were her daughters, Agnes and Mary and her 
son Joseph. We were served to frozen pudding 
fancy cakes and candy. It really is fortunate 
that Miss Potter was not with us, for I am 
afraid she would have felt obliged to be im- 
polite, judging from the night of the Sigma 
Sigma entertainment in the gym. However, 
we all ate every bit of our frozen pudding 
but not from a sense of duty. Miss Wilson 
gave us each a rose from the White House and 
then took us to call on Mrs. Bryan, it being 
her afternoon at home. There we met also 
Madame Chinda, wife of the Ambassador from 
China, a very charming woman, of whom 
the Washington society is very fond. 



LASELL LEAVES 



205 



April 8 — At 5 A. M. the alarm went off. 
We got up a little later and were all ready to 
leave at 7.30 but the bus did not come. Our 
efficient chaperone was getting a little ner- 
vous; so taxis were ordered and we arrived 
at the station with all of five minutes to get 
the train. At Philadelphia box lunches were 
bought on the train; these we all thoroughly 
enjoyed. On arriving at New York some were 
met by friends and left the party to see the 
city while the rest of us went our respective 
ways. 

April 13 — When I came back to school to- 
day, the girls who did not stop over in New 
York told me that the return trip by boat 
was as fine as the trip going. 

After having breakfast at the South 
Station the party returned to Lasell. Thus 
ended one of the most enjoyable trips of the 
year, and although sightseeing is very tiresome, 
yet we all would have been willing to be 
tired a day or two longer, so much did we 
enjoy the trip, thanks to the weather and to 
Miss Shank. 

E. L. D. 



Those who went on the Washington trip 
were: Miss Shank, Norma MacMillan, Edna 
Edwards, Eloise Bordages, Evelyn Schmidt, 
'14, Mildred Goddard, '13-'14, Veda Ferguson, 
Isabelle Bradley, Elsie Doleman, Evelina Per- 
kins, Margaret Henning, Naomi Greenwood, 
Margrethe Bauman, Lavinia Fera, Dorothy 
Aust, Katherine Clark. 



SENIOR-JUNIOR PARTY 

The Senior Class entertained the Juniors at a 
"Senior Prom" at "Gardner College, Gardner, 
Mass.," the week end of March 16. The frat 
rooms at the college were all "fixed up" for 
the occasion; tea and cakes were served at 
some of them. In the afternoon, a splendid 
concert was given by the Senior Glee Club. 
The program was : 

1. A Selection 

2. Another Selection 

3. Still Another Selection 



4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 



Now Again 

Half Done 

'Und' a Selection 

'Aussi' a Selection 

Nearly Done 

The Next to Last Selection 

Done 




"OUR DIRECTOR" 

Dinner was served at "Lasell Hotel." Tables 
were beautifully decorated with a miniature 
lake, surrounded by moss and numerous 
corsage bouquets of violets and tulips which 
were later given to the "prom" girls to wear at 
the dance ; and with yellow tea roses and pro- 
grams of the prom as place cards. After dinner 
a splendid dramatic performance was given, 
the program being as follows : 

1. Lasell Allegory 

a. The Seal 

b. Honorary Duel 

c. Lasell Leaves 

d. Allerlei 

e. Lasell vs. Radcliffe 

2. The students of Lasell have the greatest opportuni- 
ties in the complete lecture courses by the Right Hon- 
orable Humorous 

Loomis Vincent 

3. Twenty-fifth century Lasell 

4. Gardner scope, Sees all, knows all, but does not 
tell all 

a. "Was she pushed or did she fall" or "Who 

chewed my gum." 

b. Passing Show of 1915 

Endured by censored board of nationalship. 



206 



LASELL LEAVES 



Following the "Prom Show" was the "Inter- 
fraternity Dance" in the big ball room of Gard- 
ner House. A splendid orchestra furnished the 




On Monday, March fifteenth, the first 
year cooking classes enjoyed a tour of inspec- 
tion through the Walter Baker Chocolate 
Factory, in Dorchester. The whole process 
of manufacturing chocolate is very interesting, 
from removing the shells from the cocoa beans 
to wrapping the cakes of chocolate. As we 
left, each girl was given a souvenir package 
containing several varieties of the finished 
product. 



Monday morning, March 8, thirty girls 
from the second year Household Economics 
class, under the leadership of Miss Williams 
and Miss Shank, visited Drake's cake factory 
in Roxbury. It was interesting to see cake 
making on such a large scale and was a novel 
experience for all. Macaroons were passed 
around and each one was given a cake to 
take home. 



LIZZIE AND THE PORTER 

music. It is unusual to mention the service, 
but everyone has spoken of the excellent 
attention received from Miss Lizzie and the 
porter. The "prom" girls left as an expres- 
sion of their appreciation a piano lamp to be 
used in the house. All of the Juniors wish to 
thank the Seniors for the wonderful party 
which they gave them. 



On March 22, the second year Household 
Economics class went on another tour of in- 
spection. This time they took an evening 
trip to Hathaway's Bakery in Waltham, where 
they watched the making of bread, doughnuts 
and pies. The bakery has been enlarged since 
last year and is now of very good size. The 
girls were treated to cookies and doughnuts 
and given pencils as souvenirs. The trip over 
and back was made in two barges. 



On the evening of Wednesday, March 
twenty-fourth, Dr. Stanton Coit of London 
gave a very forceful address on "Woman 
and Her Responsibility in the Nation," under 
the auspices of the Woman's Suffrage League 
of Newton. Quite a few members of this 
society were present, as well as those of us 
who were fortunate enough to be able to at- 
tend. After his talk, Dr. Coit was kept busy 
for a while fulfillimg his promise to answer 
any questions his hearers might care to 
ask. 



As all of you know, the Allerlei of the Class 
of 1915 is now on sale. Those who didn't 
have the opportunity of seeing it on Satur- 
day night, surely missed a treat, for the pub- 
lication is a grand success. The book is ful 
of splendid pictures of last year and a few of 
this; and the write-ups are as good as the 
pictures. Everyone should secure a copy 
right away, you mustn't let this opportunity 
to get a lasting reminder of the girls and 
good times here at Lasell, slip by. Here is 
a chance to show your loyalty to the Senior 
Class; take advantage of it. 



LASELL LEAVES 



207 



Wednesday, March 17, the Sophomores 
entertained the Seniors, and the school at a 
dance in the gymnasium from four-thirty to 
six, and from eight to nine o'clock. A seven- 
piece orchestra furnished the music; the pro- 
grams were green four-leafed clovers; and a 
delicious green punch was served. The or- 
chestra entertained us during dinner. The 
Sophomores took the Seniors to dinner, the 
tables being prettily decorated in green. The 
whole school thanks the Sophs for the very 
good time they gave us. 



The Seniors formally "took their tables." 
Thursday night, March 25. We miss them at 
the other tables. 



Saturday night, March 27, an express team 
run by Doris Waller and Florence Evans, 
brought in, with much noise, the "Allerlei," 
just out from the printers. There was much 
rejoicing on the part of the Seniors and es- 
pecially the Board of Editors of the Allerlei, 
and Mr. Jack Connolly, who so greatly assisted 
them in getting out the book. He was present 
at dinner to witness the announcement of its 
coming out. We cannot say enough in praise 
of the book and anxiously await our own 
copies of it. 



Monday night, March fifteenth, Mrs. 
Martin read, "If I were King" and "The 
Highwayman" in the gymnasium for the 
benefit of the War Fund. The readings were 
immensely enjoyed by all. Mrs. Martin's 
generosity is appreciated. 



Thursday, April 1, was the scene of many 
partings, when the girls left for their various 
homes or those of their friends throughout 
the country for spring vacation. 



In the Carter Hall Practice Kitchen on 
Saint Patrick's Day, a special dinner was 
served. The table was decorated with flowers 
and with kewpies, dressed in green, and the 
dishes were appropriately garnished. Besides 



this party, the girls in Practice Kitchen ex- 
pect to have special luncheons each day 
during their last week. 





IN THE PRACTICE KITCHEN 



208 



LASELL LEAVES 



The following musical program, which was 
enjoyed more than any other this year, was 
given in the gymnasium. March 26, by Mr. 
Frank La Forge, pianist-composer; Mr. Boris 
Saslowsky, baritone; and Mr. Ernesto Beru- 
men, pianist: 



PROGRAM 



Bach-Liszt 



Schumann 

Schumann 

Brahms 



Organ Fantasy and Fugue in G minor 

Mr. Berumen 
Widmung 

Dichterliebe Numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 
Zigeunerlieder 5, 6, 7 

Mr. Saslawsky 
L'Alouette (The Lark) Glinka-Balakireff 

Rhapsody in C major Dohnanyi 

Mr. Berumen 
Prologue from "Pagliacci" Leoncavallo 

Mr. Saslawsky 
Improvisation Frank La Forge 

Gavotte and Musette Frank La Force 

Romance Frank La Forge 

Mr. Berumen 
Longing Frank La Forge 

Love's Sympathy 
To a Messenger 

Retreat " " 

The Lovely Rose 
Take, O Take those Lips Away 

Mr. Saslawsky 
Mephisto (The Dance in the Village Inn) Franz Liszt 

Mr. Berumen 



Wednesday night, March seventeenth, we 
had a very interesting illustrated lecture, "A 
Trip up the Rhine," by Mr. Luitweiler, who 
is a friend of Dr. Winslow. 



Two other valuable illustrated lectures dur- 
ing this month have been given, one by Mr. 
Winthrop Packard, from the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society, on "Birds," and one by 
Mme. Guerin on "Marie Antoinette." The 
latter was read in French and was made es- 
pecially entertaining, because Mme. Guerin 
wore the French costumes of the revolution- 
ary period. 



Parliamentary law classes have been con- 
tinued during this month. We are gradually 
becoming accustomed to the correct method 
of carrying on a business meeting, and so are 
much more alert than at first. 



BIRD CLUB 

On March sixteenth, a bird club was or- 
ganized at Lasell which is to be under the 
direction of Mr. E. J. Winslow. Miss Kathe- 
rine Deaborn was elected, president and Miss 
Marion Lerch, secretary. A party was taken 
to the Natural Museum in Boston to be- 
come acquainted with the birds of this neigh- 
borhood in order that they might recognize 
them on the early morning walks, which are 
already becoming popular. 



On the afternoons of March 18, 19 and 20, 
Miss Mullikin held her annual exhibition of 
paintings in the studio. About forty-eight 
pictures were exhibited, some remarkable 
for suggestive atmospheric effects, and others 
for true, vivid portrayal. Three which 
perhaps attracted special attention from the 
girls were: A portrait of Mile. Guiner, former 
assistant to Mile. Le Royer, and two land- 
scapes, one from North Wayne and one from 
Mt. Desert Island, Maine. The Sigma Sigma 
assisted in serving tea and cakes. 



The second French tea given by Mile. Le 

Royer and her pupils was one of the many 

social events of the last month. It was a 

delightful affair and enjoyed by many guests 

as well as by the Lasell girls who are studying 

French. A pleasant program was added: 

Clair de Lune Miss Sweet 

Les Djinns Miss Lord 

Victor Hugo Miss Whiting 

Miss Thorp 

Si Mes Vers Avaient des Ailes Miss Brix 

Bergerettes Miss Farley 

La Fiancee de Timbalier Miss Zach 

Victor Hugo 

Chansons du XVIII siecle Mile. Louise Le Royer 

After this program had been given tea and 
crackers were served. 



The Committee for war relief work is glad 
to make the following report. 

Since the first week in February when the 
fund for relief work in Northern France was 
started $254.21 has been placed in the treas- 
ury as the result of voluntary pledges of the 



LASELL LEAVES 



209 



students and faculty. In addition to this 
sum we gratefully acknowledge the following: 

Proceeds from an entertainment given 
under Miss Mulliken's direction 
by the girls of the Art Depart- 
ment $22.00 

Proceeds from a swimming exhibit. . .6.80 
Proceeds from Mrs. Martin's recital. .48.50 
A gift of an old Lasell girl, Etta 
McMillan Rowe 15.00 



THE NEW EDITOR 



>2.30 



The total amount is; therefore, $346.51. 

February 24, a check for $200 was given to 
Mrs. Royal Whiton, head of the Women's Fed- 
erated Club work in Massachusetts through 
which channel Mr. Brown Landone, the 
inspirer of this work, wished all money and 
aid to go. The remainder of the money is 
to be used in purchasing surgical kits and 
necessary supplies. Several ^Saturday even- 
ings were given by various girls to the cutting 
and folding of first aid dressings for wounds. 

Enthusiasm and generosity have been shown 
in this endeavor to relieve the suffering in 
stricken lives across the sea. 



On the last day of school before the Easter 
holidays, as we entered the dining room for 
breakfast, we saw the Sophomore banner 
with "Happy Easter" in large white letters 
above it. It was just like the loyal class of 
'17 to wish the whole school a pleasant vaca- 
tion in this novel way. Later, in chapel, 
we enjoyed very much two readings by Eloise 
Bordages — "Cecily and the Bears" and "Las- 
ka." Mrs. Martin also read a selection ap- 
propriate for the day. After Mrs. Martin's 
reading, the Seniors sang a song, the words of 
which were as follows: 




CAROL RICE 



BUSINESS MANAGER 




ERANCES HARRIS 




CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR NOTES 

The prayer meeting on March the six- 
teenth was led by the Rev. Harry Beal, who 
said that only when we had entered into our 
"second childhood" would we be true Chris- 
tians. We may know this "second child- 
hood" by two characteristics: dependence and 
faith, and the taking of everything in the spirit 
of adventure. 

On March the twenty-third Miss Nutt 
led the prayer-meeting. After reading an 
account of the transfiguration of Christ, she 
impressed upon us the value of lowly service. 
"Faithfulness in humble service," she said, 
"will lead to transfiguration in our lives." 

The prayer meeting on March the thir- 
teenth was conducted under dual leadership. 
Mr. Frank Stone and Mr. Arthur Newell, 
both students in the theological department 
of Harvard College, brought us Easter mes- 
sages through their talks and music. They 
emphasized the thought that if we would have 
our lives powerful we must let the God-life 
live in us. 

These splendid messages were enjoyed by a 
large number. 

VESPERS 

On March the twenty-first, Mrs. Sproul, 
who has charge of the Woman's Missionary 



work in the Methodist churches of New Eng- 
land, brought out in her "fire-side" talk: 
"Be something, somewhere, now" the value 
of our prayers to missionaries; that if we 
would have our prayers full of life — have them 
amount to something, we must "get through 
to God;" in other words — become connected 
with the source of power. 

All of the "old girls" were glad to welcome 
again Mr. Frank Speare, educational director 
of the Boston Y. M. C. A., March the twenty- 
eighth. He impressed upon us the responsibili- 
ties, financial, social, and moral, which we, the 
women of the coming generation, must meet, 
and pointed out some of the rocks and shoals 
in our course. Mr. Speare commended as the 
source of power to help us meet these responsi- 
bilities — God, our Father. 



? i 4 O 



*& 



p 



a 





DITORIA 




All of you girls have heard the same plea 
from staffs going out of office and from those 
just coming in, that everyone should help 
make the paper full of interest and spirit. 
No doubt, at the time, you fully intended to 
help the editors, but you couldn't think of 
anything that you were able to do. You 
felt that you couldn't write stories or poetry, 
but don't you suppose that you could have 
described that Bunker Hill trip or told of the 
party to Walter Baker's? It is really im- 
possible for the Local Editors to go to all the 
school affairs, and so if they ask you to write 
up the French Tea or some class party, don't 
you think that you could give a little time to 
it? If you do the writing at once it doesn't 
take long, and if you could in the least realize 
the time that the Local Editors have to spend 
in writing up all the events which they them- 
selves can attend, surely you would be willing 
to do that little to help them. 

Then there are the funny things which 
are heard in the class room. Just take a 
moment and write them down, and put them 
in the Leaves box or hand them to someone 
on the staff. If you hear any particularly 
good joke, put it down and hand that in also. 

From all the groups of girls seen starting 
out on walks, armed with cameras, we suppose 
that there are hundreds of good pictures 



taken which would enliven the magazine a 
whole lot; but the editors have not the time 
to hunt up those photographs. Can't you 
bring some to them? If you are taking 
pictures make it a point to take one or two 
that could be used in the paper. Pictures and 
jokes add a great deal to a school magazine. 
These are just a few suggestions of things 
you might do with very little inconvenience to 
yourself, and which would mean a great deal 
to the staff and the paper. Let us see if this 
year the girls won't offer help instead of giving 
it just when it is asked. The girls on the 
staff mean to do their best this year. If you 
will cooperate with them, the Lasell Leaves 
will not fail to be a truly representative school 
paper. 



I wonder how many of us avail ourselves 
of the splendid opportunities our library 
affords, not only for studying, but for pleasure 
reading? So many varieties of books are 
to be found there, — the best fiction by stand- 
ard authors, poetry, biographies, history, 
travel papers, encyclopedias and reference 
books, and many of the current magazines. 
Most of us are apt to say, "Oh, I haven't 
time to read a book," and then sit down and 
waste half an hour or more at a time with a 



212 



LASELL LEAVES 



magazine. If we took some good book and 
read half an hour in it each day, we should 
finish it in time, and have one more book to 
our credit. To be sure, there is much of 
value to be gained from the magazines in the 
way of current events and travel papers; but 
we are more than likely to read only the stories 
and let the more worth-while articles go. 
After reading a certain number of short stories, 
one's mind becomes supersaturated with 
them. They are entirely forgotten the next 
day, and have only served to waste time 
which might have been put to better ad- 
vantage. 

There is another point in connection with 
the use of the library. Let us be careful how 
we use it. Sometimes during study hour one 
cannot concentrate her thoughts on a lesson, 
because some girl is talking and laugh- 
ing. The latter, who perhaps, has all of her 
next day's lessons prepared, forgets that 
others are not so fortunate as she. Often 
magazines, never to be taken from the library, 
are missing, and the rest of the school is de- 
prived of the use of a later issue of that 
magazine as well as the missing number, 
until the borrower returns it. Can we not 
try to be more considerate in these matters 
in the future? 

The following is a list of some of the new 
books to be found in the library: — 

Dickens' Works — 30 vols. 
"With the Allies"— Richard Harding Davis 
"Fighting in Flanders" — E. Alexander 
Powell 

"Pan-Germanism" — Roland G. Usher 

Bulfmch's "Age of Fable" 

Gayley's "Classic Myths" 

Who's who in America — Vol. 8 

International Year Book 

Conference of American Teachers of 
International Law 

Velhagen & Klasing's Monatshefte — 3 vols 
"The Mill on the Floss"— George Eliot 
"The Day's Work"— Kipling 
"Birds of North America" — Chapman 



THE BLUEBELLS OF NEW ENGLAND 

The roses are a regal troop, 
And modest folk the daisies; 
But, Bluebells of New England, 
To you I give my praises — 

To you , fair phantoms in the sun, 
Whom merry Spring discovers, 
With bluebirds for your laureates , 
And honey-bees for lovers. 

The south-wind breathes, and lo! you throng 
This rugged land of ours: 
I think the pale blue clouds of May 
Drop down, and turn to flowers! 

By cottage doors along the roads 
You show your winsome faces, 
And, like the spectre lady, haunt 
The lonely woodland places. 

All night your eyes are closed in sleep, 
Kept fresh for day's adorning: 
Such simple faith as yours can see 
God's coming in the morning! 

You lead me by your holiness 
To pleasant ways of duty; 
You set my thoughts to melody, 
You fill me with your beauty. 

Long may the heavens give you rain, 
The sunshine its caresses, 
Long may the woman that I love 
Entwine you in her tresses! 

Thomas Bailey Aldrich. 



DIDO'S CURSE 

{Metrical translation.) 

Great Sun, who lights up all the earth with flowers, 

Fair Juno too, a witness of my woes 

And Hecate whose name is called at night; 

Ye Gods of dying Dido and ye Fates, 

O, hear my prayers and stoop to aid my griefs, 

If all the changeless fates of Jove demand 

That he should touch the port and reach the land 

It must remain as by the fates decreed. 

But, worried by the arms of war and strife 

Expelled from home and from his son's embrace 

May he be forced to seek for help from me 

Nor e'en at length enjoy the sought for land 

But let him die before his fated day 

And lie unburied on a desert strand 

And now I pour my last words out with blood. 

O Sons of Tyre, pursue this race with hate 

And to my ashes welcome tribute give 

Never in league of peace with him to live 

Let some avenger use a child of mine, 

Pursue with endless wars this wretched man 

Oppose our shores to his and waves to waves 

Let our victorious arms forever stand 

Against this man and all his wicked race. 




WESTWARD HO! 

The Lasell Party expect to leave Boston 
for California and the Expositions on June 
twentiety-ninth. They will go West by the 
way of the Grand Canyon and return by the 
Canadian Rockies. The six weeks' itinerary 
seems to include all the worth while sights in 
California and the most interesting places en 
route both ways. Arrangements will be 
made whereby "old girls" and their friends 
can join the party at any point. A complete 
itinerary will be furnished any interested 
"old girls." Address all inquiries to Miss 
L. R. Potter, Lasell Seminary. 



Bertine Libby, '13 is certainly "making 
good" as Physical Training Director of the 
Y. W. C. A. of her home town. In her note 
which accompanies a complimentary press 
notice of her recent fine exhibition, she 
writes, "If it had not been for Miss Warner's 
fine training I would probably not be doing 
gymnasium work." 



Amy Brannan, '10 writes from Daytona, 
Florida, where she is convalescing after an 
operation for appendicitis. She expects to 
be at Lasell in June for- her class reunion. 



A beautiful card which came to our pre- 
ceptress at Easter time, for which she is very 
grateful, was one from Mr. and Mrs. Shep- 
herd and Bess, '94. Mr. Shepherd is traveling 
in California, Mrs. Shepherd at home in 
Evanston, and Rebecca enjoying her school 
work. 



A very large number of "old girls" are al- 
ready booked for Lasell at Commencement 
time. We urge as many as possible to come 
and also to engage their places if they wish 
to be in or near the Seminary. 



Mr. and Mrs. George R. Crowe announce 
the marriage of their daughter Annie Maude, 
'09 to Captain William Henry Colluni on 
Wednesday evening, March tenth, at Winni- 
peg, Man. The marriage of our dear Annie 
Crowe attracts unusual attention, coming as 
it does in war times and especially as her 
husband is an officer in the Canadian army. 
Along with our congratulations, we earnestly 
pray that Annie's husband will not be called 
to join the army on the field! 



214 



LASELL LEAVES 



Some of the beautiful lullabies which Agnes 
Adelsdorf Strauss, '12 used to sing to us in 
the old school days are now being put into 
practical use, for Agnes is the mother of a 
little son, John Alexander, born March 13. 
And on the same day Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
A. Allen (Helen Marshall) welcomed a little 
son, Marshall Bigelow. Our congratulations 
to these happy parents and the boys! 



The Michigan Lasell Club ask that if there 
are any Lasell girls in Michigan or Toledo or 
neighboring towns, who have not been 
notified of the formation of the Michigan 
Lasell Club, they notify the secretary, Eleanora 
Stroh, 548 East Grand Boulevard, Detroit, 
Mich. We congratulate the Club on having 
such a wide-awake secretary! 



That was a kind word which came to us 
from Hazel Harris, '14, who is teaching this 
year in Barton Academy, Barton,Vt., "not 
very far from home," and is enthusiastic 
over her work. Hazel has the music and 
domestic science departments. Coming new 
girls take notice of this confession: "Do you 
remember how very homesick I was when I 
first came to Lasell? But now I would like 
to come back, especially in order to take 
lessons from Professor Dunham and to live 
again in Gardner." We thank her for her 
good wishes for Lasell and congratulate her 
on her success as a pedagogue. 



We are not surprised that Hannah Binga- 
man, '14 and Lena Vee Kelley, '14 are plan- 
ning to come back together in June. Hannah 
says "she realizes more and more that 
the three years at Lasell were not only happy 
ones but helpful ones." We thank her for 
all her kind words and good wishes. 



"Anna Curry Todd called last week on her 
way from Oceanside, California, where she 
lives, to Seattle, in hot haste to see her first 
grandchild by her daughter Virginia who has 
been living in Alaska. Anna looks very well. 
Miss Jennie Vail, Barbara's ('05) aunt, is in 
this section on her way from Japan, where 
she is a teacher in our school at Tokyo, for a 
year's vacation. Judge W. H. Seamans of 
Sheboygan, Wis., father of our Mary Sea- 
mans, died in Coronado, California, March 
sixth. He was Judge of the United States 
Circuit Court. Grace Ordway Miller, of 
Monterey, California, is the happy mother of 
a two and a half year old boy who keeps her 
delightfully and delightedly busy. Mr. Miller 
manages the drug store which Grace inherited. 
Agnes Bachelor Wylie, of Saginaw, Mich., 
spends the winters in Pasadena now and then 
and showed me today a blooming young 
woman whom she claimed as her daughter. 
I found it hard to believe, for I haven't seen 
Agnes since she herself was a girl at Lasell! 
The years make great demands on our 
credulity as they pass! 



Few people keep up their devoted, ac- 
tive interest in the school as does our Prin- 
cipal Emeritus. In his last word he tells us 



Etta MacMillan Rowe sent us a delightful 
message and a very generous contribution 
to the War Relief Fund. She happened to 
read in her Leaves a report of what the girls 
are doing and decided to have a share in the 
good work, which was just like her dear self 
to do! She is having a beautiful winter in 
Florida where Mr. Rowe is building a 
new home which has the attractive name of 
"Sunny Pines." Her generous tribute to the 
"helpfulness of the principal and faculty at 
Lasell" makes that same faculty long to do 
bigger and better things! She speaks of a 
chance meeting with friends whom they had 
previously known in Bermuda, one of the group 
proved to be Miss Whitin, who was at Lasell 
in 1856, and a cousin of the wife of Prin- 
cipal Lasell. Etta also adds that she received 
a letter from Mary Starr Utter, '12 in which 
Mary Starr wrote of her active interest in 
Campfire Girls and Red Cross work. 



LASELL LEAVES 



215 



While spending a few days recently at 
Winthrop Beach, Mrs. Minnie Ransom Wag- 
ner and Miss Martha Ransom had a delight- 
ful chance meeting with a Lasell girl of olden 
times, Mrs. Adelaide Baldwin Hollis, at the 
school in 1853-54-55. Mrs. Hollis has lost 
not one iota of her splendid school spirit. 
She spoke with enthusiasm of Principals 
Lasell and Briggs, and among her school- 
mates recalled with special pleasure the Misses 
Whitin. It certainly is a privilege to meet 
these representative Lasell girls of long ago. 
Lasell of today is honored by their unfailing 
loyalty and friendship. 



have we been so shocked and grieved as we 
were upon receiving the sad tidings from 
Genevra Strong that our beloved Mary 
Eaton Nichols had passed away on March 
thirtieth. The unusually beautiful tribute 
which appeared in the New Haven Times- 
Leader was indeed deserved. Besides the 
older members of her family, she leaves a 
little daughter, born, Sunday, March twen- 
ty-eighth. Lasell 's sincerest sympathy is ex- 
tended to each one of these bereaved friends 
and their families. 



A Saratoga Springs daily paper has an 
interesting account of the work of the St. 
Christina School and the information that it 
is to be moved to Cooperstown, N. Y. We 
are especially interested because of the splen- 
did work which has been carried on there in 
the department of domestic science under the 
direction of our own Ruth Trowbridge, '13. 
Our best wishes go with their new departure 
along the line of Christian service. 



Much sympathy is felt for Rena Caldwell 
who is mourning the loss of her mother, 
Mrs. T. J. Caldwell, who died Saturday, 
March sixth. 



The Vesper Service on March fourteenth 
was led by Prof. Marshall L. Perrin of Boston 
University whom the "old girls" remember 
for his splendid talks at other Vesper ser- 
vices in the past. He spoke on inspiration 
and duty as the two guiding forces of life- 
inspiration from the life of Christ and all the 
great and noble things which Christian civili- 
zation has placed about us — duty as revealed 
by Christ's word and our trained com- 
prehension of the needs of the society and 
age in which we live. 



March was an unusually sad month for a 
number of our students who sustained the loss 
of loved ones. Dear Betty Carter's mother 
passed away and Angeline Emery's, '14, 
grandmother and nephew died within a short 
time of each other. Our present school- 
mate, Dorothy Hadley's father died very 
suddenly on March twenty-ninth. Seldom 



MY EXPERIENCES IN EUROPE 

{Continued from March Leaves) 
One day on the trolley to Vevey, one 
of the Russian girls at the hotel kept nodding 
towards a fine looking woman sitting just 
across the aisle from me, and whispering in 
German. After we had left the car she ex- 
plained that it was Mme. Caillaux, who shot 
and killed the French official. We went to 
Vevey for pass-ports or rather the registration 
certificates now issued instead. 

At sunrise we took the boat for Geneva, 
where the consul advised us to take food and 
water enough for four meals and go on to 
Paris and then to England. The trip usually 
takes about ten hours but it took us twenty- 
nine. We chased to five different banks be- 
fore we succeeded in getting a hundred franc 
note (twenty dollars) changed, and, after 
buying a market basket and filling it we went 
over at three o'clock to get seats on the 
five-thirty train. At Bellegarde we had 
to have our pass-ports examined and 
stamped and the station reminded one 
of some horrible night-mare. We were 
pushed and shoved and carried along without 
touching the ground at all. Then we took a 
third class car to Amberview where we stood 
from nine-thirty P. M. to one thirty A. M.— 



216 



LASELL LEAVES 



four long hours — in^the rain outside the sta- 
tion, while car after car of men, horses, guns 
and ambulances were going to the front and 
wounded men were being sent back to Paris. 
They were all singing the "Marseillaise" and 
would end with "Heep, heep, hurrah." The 
station was fitted up with beds for the des- 
perately wounded. 

We were lucky enough to get a second class 
car this time and the rest of the night was 
spent sitting up or leaning against each other. 
The trains were overcrowded and would stop 
with a jerk that broke the windows and made 
us jump to hold the luggage on the racks 
every time we began to slow down — after we 
had two twenty-six inch suit cases descend 
on our heads. 

An Englishman and his wife were in the 
compartment with us. Their bottle of claret 
broke and saturated their lunch but they 
refused to open the window for fear of a 
draught! In the morning they scrapped over 
the one remaining egg as they both preferred 
it to the claret soaked sandwiches and cheese. 
He finally ate it. 

Paris, August twenty-first was so different 
from Paris in July. There were no young 
men to be seen (except an officer now and 
then) just boys and old men to help with the 
luggage. The tri-color covered the theatrical 
posters and many shops were closed, the tri- 
color on the shutters and a card 'Sur drapeaux' 
on the door. Women were cleaning the streets 
and women driving the cabs. 

The next day we had our pass-ports stamped 
by the British consul, restocked our market 
baskets and, as before, went two hours ahead 
of time to get seats on the train. In our com- 
partment there was a French soldier of the 
109th territorial infantry, who talked all 
night. It was impossible to sleep and we were 
very glad to have him talk. He had been in 
business in England for fourteen years but 
had gone to his regiment when mobilization 
was ordered. France had called every man to 
the colors and then sent back all those over 
forty to carry on business and to gather in the 



harvests till they should be needed. He had 
served his fifteen days and was going back to 
England, awaiting the call for men over forty. 

He pointed out many vacated houses on the 
out-skirts of Paris and told us that they were 
to be torn down immediately as they were 
within the "military zone." When we passed 
car-barns we noticed that every engine had 
steam up and was ready to be used at any 
time. 

Every twelve or eighteen months a small 
packet is sent to every station in France with 
directions that it be kept unopened until 
further orders are received. From time to 
time other sealed packets are sent and the 
former ones ordered returned. When mobili- 
zation was ordered a telegram was sent to 
every station large and small, ordering these 
packets to be opened. They contained badges 
and arm-bands for the men and explicit direc- 
tions for the management of the lines, the- 
cars and — everything. 

This soldier explained that the box-car 
after box-car which followed the cars of men 
and horses were supplies and that the tank- 
cars contained quick lime to be poured over 
the trenches of the dead bodies. He told us 
that he had seen a man wounded through 
the hips and helpless, with both eyes gouged 
out by a German soldier and another man 
with both hands cut off. 

At his suggestion we looked for the adver- 
tisements of a certain beef extract which was 
a German product. Before the war started 
these advertisements were all over but now not 
one was to be seen. It seems that on the back 
of each sign-board were some numbers, which, 
when read by means of a code, gave definite 
information concerning the wealth of the com- 
munity, the number of fighting men, the 
number of horses, the nearest garrison, etc. 
Another of our companions was a little English 
actress, who was most fascinating. She had 
been in Warsaw during an epidemic of black- 
pox; in the Paris flood, and, in fact, had had 
some very thrilling experiences. She was 
very pretty and not over twenty, I should 



LASELL LEAVES 



217 



say. She told us that there were eighteen 
chorus girls in Luzerne whose passports had 
been stolen. The authorities feared that they 
had been stolen by spies and refused to issue 
others. The girls couldn't leave the country 
without pass-ports and, as they had used up 
most of their money they had no idea what 
to do. She remarked "I am going back to 
England with just the clothes I stand in, and 
I'm one big ache." 

Our other companions were a French 
woman, whose husband was in the Belgian 
engineering corps and who was going as near 
the lines as she dared — a Cleveland music 
teacher with his English wife — and a French 
man employed by Pathe Frere. 

At Amiens we changed again. I saw an 
American tip a guard, who pointed to a dark 
line of empty cars at the other end of the 
station. Then I informed our party and we 
picked up our suit-cases and followed. An 
American stuck his head out of a compart- 
ment and said, "Room for three in here," 
whereupon we joyfully responded, "We're 
the three." We dimmed the light (and 
stretched out( ?) on the seats, two on a side, 
and two on cushions on the floor) and had a 
little nap before, four hours later, the train 
was switched over to the other side of the 
station, where we were supposed to have been 
patiently waiting all this time. It was here 
that we saw the first car-loads of English 
soldiers and the Highland regiments with their 
jaunty little caps. 

We had a very smooth passage over the 
channel. It gave us quite a jolt when we 
found that Americans must show their pass- 
ports at the door marked "Aliens." There 
were eight war-ships guarding the channel 
and four transports of soldiers, who called, 
"Are we down-hearted? Hurray, hurray, 
hurray!" 

We stayed a week in London visiting the 
various galleries now opened because of the 
truce declared by the suffragettes. At the 



steamship offices we found first class and 
usually second too, all booked till October 
first. It was then August twenty-fourth. 
Everywhere in the parks were detachments 
of cavalry camping and awaiting orders to go. 
In vacant lots fresh recruits were drilling or 
learning to dig trenches and to set up the 
camp kitchen (The picture was taken from 
our hotel window) . Wounded soldiers were 
beginning to arrive and we saw them being 
carried in autos hastily converted into am- 
balances. 

We sailed on the "Creole"-— a Southern 
Pacific boat chartered by Raymond and Whit- 
comb Company (at a loss, as it had to come 
over empty) to bring their tourists home. We 
lay in the harbor three days, finally sailing 
September second. They had a new victrola 
and three times the diningroom tables and 
chairs were unscrewed and the floor waxed 
so we could dance. It was startling to say the 
least to have the floor suddenly rise to meet 
you — during the skating step of the Maxixe, 
for instance. We had a concert, a book party, 
at which I borrowed the chef's cap and apron 
and represented a "cook book," and a spelling 
match at which I won second prize, a box of 
chocolates labelled "a baby grand piano." 
We sat at the captain's table and he was very 
much amused at the way the entire table wel- 
comed cantaloupes, corn on the cob, and ice 
water. 

We passed the "Laconia" with its funnels 
painted black, and the "Aquitania" painted 
black and with its bow stove in from some 
collision. 

We reached Atlantic City, September 
eleventh and found our various relatives quite 
agitated as they hadn't heard from us since 
the middle of July and they knew that we had 
intended to go through Austria and Germany, 
sailing from Hamburg. Since then we've 
been complying with the various requests to 
"tell us all about it." 

Marion Shinn, '11. 




Lasell Leaves acknowledges with thanks the 
receipt of the following March magazines: 

The Oracle, The Classmate, The Triangle, 
TheB. H. S. Tatler, The Electron, The Roman, 
The X-Ray, The Optimist, The Student, The 
School Review, The Elgin H. S. Mirror, The 
Academian, New Trier Echoes, The Lion, 
Gold and Black, Aegis, Boston University 
Beacon, The Imp, The Grotonian, The Her- 
monite, Reflector, The Argus, The Brimmer, 
School Magazine, Central High News, The 
World, The Black and Red Review, Keene 
Kronicle, The Tattler, The News, The Oracle, 
The Acropolis, Orange and Blue, The Owl, 
The Quarterly Tatler, Shucis, The Quill, The 
Ramble, The Forum, The Messenger, The 
Tatler, University School News, The Mirror, 
The Iris, The Columbian, High School News, 
The Tattler, The Missile, The Student, The 
Mirror, The Student, The Dial, Pasco School 
News, The Reminder. 



AS IN A LOOKING GLASS 

Lasell Leaves — You certainly have a fine 
literary department. The story, "A True 
Heroine" is fine. "Only a Brother" is also 
good. The photographs add greatly to your 
magazine. — The Argus. 



The Lasell Leaves is one of our most favored 
exchanges. Your literary department is cer- 
tainly far above the average. — Knick Knacks. 

Lasell Leaves is enjoyed as much as ever. 
The story, "A True Heroine" is good and 
quite worthy of first prize. "Only a Brother" 
is also good — William Woods College Record. 

Lasell Leaves — One of our favorites. You 
have an attractive cover design. Your 
students seem to have some school spirit — 
Elizabeth City High School Tatler. 

Lasell Leaves — Well arranged; your "Per- 
sonal" section must be very interesting to an 
old girl. — Ivy Leaves. 

Lasell Leaves — As a whole your magazine 
is very good and we have no fault to find with 
it, but would it not improve your magazine 
by having your joke department in proportion 
to the others? Your locals and personals are 
good. "A True Heroine" shows very good 
work on the part of the author. "Only a 
Brother" is also very good. — Messenger. 

Lasell Leaves — It seems too bad to spoil the 
appearance of so good a paper by one page 
of advertisements placed before your reading 
matter. — Vail-Deane Budget. 

"A True Heroine" was a fine interesting 
story and well written, so was "Only a 



LASELL LEAVES 



219 



Brother." Lasell Leaves is certainly a literary 
paper. To repeat, we enjoy this paper thor- 
oughly. — The Electron. 

Lasell Leaves — "A True Heroine" is worthy 
of comment. — The Triangle. 

Lasell Leaves — Your paper is complete in 
e v ery detail. The photographs and cuts add 
greatly to it. — The Dial. 

Lasell Leaves — Such an appropriate cover. 
This is the best illustrated magazine we have. 
"The Lasell European Trip" is both interesting 
and instructive. — The Sage. 



LOST AND FOUND 

Found — A splendid magazine in " Keene 
Kronicle, well arranged and with well- 
proportioned departments. The writer of 
the poem "The Teacher" deserves high praise. 

Lost — An exchange department. Finder 
please return to The News. 

Found — In The Missile— "The Gift," a 
splendid story and well written. We hope to 
see more like it. Good literary department. 

Lost — Some stories. Finder please return 
to King Edward's School Chronicle. 

The Acropolis — A well arranged magazine. 
Shows plenty of school spirit. The cut in 
connection with the athletic department is 
fine. 

The A rgus — You have an artistic cover and 
an unusual name. Those of us who have 
used paper and pens furnished by the public 
schools can appreciate the poem, "Give Me a 
New Steel Pen, Teacher." 

Gold and Black — Could not your literary 
department be improved? Your stories do 
not measure up to our standards. 

Orange and Blue — That patriotism is not 
dead is shown by your splendid article "The 
Father and The Saviour of Our Country." 
The author deserves credit. 

We are glad to welcome The Tattler from 
Shreeveport, Louisiana, and hope to see it 
regularly. "The Senior Class History" and 
"As We Will Be" are very well written. 

The Dean Megaphone — "Old Days at Dean" 
must bring back many pleasant memories to 



the class of '14. The cuts of the boys' recrea- 
tion rooms are very attractive. 

The Goldenrod — A well arranged magazine. 
Your athletic notes show your strong school 
spirit. 

The Columbian — Your jokes are the cause of 
much hearty laughter from our girls. 

Welcome to The Purple and Gold. We hope 
you have come to stay. Much curiosity has 
been aroused as to the outcome of your well- 
written story "Which Did More?" 

The Grotonian — Your magazine has an ex- 
cellent literary department and a good 
arrangement. The article "Where Groton 
Boys are Needed" is highly commendable 
as it shows the high standards of the school. 

High School Tattler — Your joke and ex- 
change departments are worthy of praise. 

A . H. S. Record — A few more stories would 
greatly increase the value of your literary 
department. 

The Owl — Your story "A Chance of Fate" 
is very cleverly written. 

Knick Knacks — "Efficiency" is an appro 
priate title for your editorial and we wish 
that everyone would read it and profit by its 
good advice. Your school notes must be of 
great interest to the students. 



F. E. on receipt of her neighbor's crumbs 
at table: 

"Well, I should call that a 'crummy' gift 
and not a well-bred one." 



E. P. reading from Henry Esmond: "My 
Lord was made warden of the king's but- 
teries." 

Teacher: "What were the butteries?" 
E. P.: "I suppose they were the places 
where thev made butter." 



WHERE IT IS 

Old Fogey: "I wonder what has become of 
the old-fashioned dime-novel?" 

Old Grouchy: "It has gone up to a dollar 
and a half." 



220 



LASELL LEAVES 



LASELL STUDENTS 

Will Make No Mistakes 
In Depending Upon 

New England's 
Greatest Store 

FOR THEIR VARIOUS NEEDS 



Here one may choose from 

unequaled assortments of 

Clothing Furnishing Rugs Pictures 

Artwares Trunks and Luggage 

and the many other things so frequently 
needed during college days 



Best of all, selection here is never from 
commonplace stock but from the best that 
Europe and America can produce 



Jordan Marsh Company 



BOSTON 



Jfflts&esi' $ats 
$10.00 and $15.00 




Jaunty, youthful hats in stylish models espe- 
cially designed for young ladies are a notable fea- 
ture of Chandler & Co.'s millinery department. 
At $10.00 and $15.00 there is a splendid assort- 
ment. 

CfjanUler & Company 

151 Fremont Street, Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



221 



Order by Mail 



Washable 

CORDUROY SKIRTS 



With Patch Pockets and Wash- 
able Bone Buttons. Stylish 
and Practical. Just the thing 
for any out of door sport as 
well as in-door wear. They 
come in white and colors. 



One Style for $3.75 and another at $5.50 

According to quality of the Corduroy. 

C. F. Hovey Company 

Summer, Ghauncy and Avon Streets 
BOSTON, MASS. 




The Plastic Shoe 



(Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 




In Low or High Cut 
and also in Pumps 



The Plastic Shoe 
is the result of 30 
years of study in 
the search for a 
shoe that will help 
all foot troubles and 
still retain a grace- 
ful appearance. 

The Plastic Shoe 
assists one to walk 
as nature intended. 
It removes the 
strain and ache 
resulting from walk- 
ing or standing in 
ill fitting shoes. 



Thayer, McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



When You Visit Lasell Stop at 

NYE PARK INN 

46 GROVE STREET 
Between the Seminary and Station 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

FIRE PROOF GARAGE 



222 



LASELL LEAVES 



CHINA AND GLASS 

The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in this line 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glass 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits every season by our buyers to the 
best makers in Great Britain, France, Germany, Austria and Amer- 
ica. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS Gallery 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

FRANKLIN, COR. HAWLEY ST., BOSTON 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 

Compliments of 

GEO. J. BARKER LUMBER CO. 



WALTHAM, MASS. 

George C. Folsom 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 

W. F. HADLOCK 
Newsdealer and Stationer 

Developing and Printing 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CAPODANNO & ALBANO 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco. 



331 AUBURN ST. 



AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Tel. Con. 



C. A. DONOVAN 

345 AUBURN STREET AUBURNDALE 

Ladies' and Men's Furnishings 
Dry Goods and Small Wares 

ELLIOTT W. KEYES 
PHARMACIST 
Drugs - Medicines-Chemicals-Choice Confections 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 




HAYDEN 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 

College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 

COTTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 
CAPS and GOWNS 

to the American Universities and 
Colleges, to Lasell Seminary and 
scores of other Academies. 

CLASS CONTRACTS A 
SPECIALTY. 

PULPIT and CHOIR GOWNS. 

newton Ice Company 

MILLER BROS. 

Addre™" Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 



PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Receipts 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 PORTLAND STREET, BOSTON 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for Price List of over. 60 kinds 



CARDS AND GIFTS 

The ^exv <Slaoi3 

149 TREMONT ST., ROOM 923, BOSTON, MASS. 

Waists and Dresses Made at Low Prices 
WAISTS $3.50 DRESSES $8.00 & $10.00 

C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 
Jfluatc Bealers 

Announce their Removal to 

2B Park Street, Boston. Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Three doors above their old store. Send for our recent 
catalogues. Mail orders filled the same day as received. 
Music sent on selection if desired. 




LAS ELL LEAVES 



223 



SCHOOL 
STATIONERY 



Note Books 

Students' Paper 
Fountain Pens, etc. 



Engraved and Printed 

Programs Invitations Dance Orders 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON 7 SQUARE 



BOSTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Telephone 686 Haymarket 



SPORT COATS 

MACKINAWS 
SERGE MIDDY SUITS 



SPECIALTIES 

FOR 

COLLEGE GIRLS 



Send for Illustrated Booklet 

Henry S. Lombard 

22 to 26 Merchants Row 
BOSTON, MASS. 




Ladies are delighted 

with the results of using Camp- 
bell's Stain on Floors, Furni- 
ture and Woodwork. 

Gives superb finish, brings out 
the natural grain of the wood. 
Write for color card 

Carpenter-Morton Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Established 1882 



Incorporated 1904 



GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costtumers 

6 Boylston Place, Boston, Mass. 

College Dramatic Work a Specialty 
Telephone Oxford 145 



iHaugusi 
printing 
Company 

Wlrtlefilep 
jfflassiacJjusetts 



224 LASELL LEAVES 



Telephones Hay market 2311-2312 



Flowers 
of Quality 



HOUGHTON -GORNEY CO. 

:-: Florists :-: 



119 TREMONT STREET, 

[Park Street Church] 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Specialty 

Flower Shop of Boston 



FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED TO ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Free Delivery to Lasell 



The 

A.LLERLEI 

nwi iu,\n\m\mwmm iinmaif wn m— ih^mmium — h^iiim— — MiiiiM^iMinw—MMiini iim ■■■■■iimm^^mii^i mhi ■■■— ^■^^m— mi 

Is Now Ready 



The ALLERLEI of the Class of 1915 is now ready for distribution. 
As only a limited edition has been printed, it is earnestly requested that 
you place your order at once with Bess Bmerine. 

This book is the best that has ever been published by a class at 
Lasell. It contains 188 pages and nearly 300 illustrations. 

The price is $2.00. Postage 25 cents extra. 



L. P. HOLLANDER CO, 

202 Boyiston Street 

Boston 

The New Spring Designs in 
DRESSES, SUITS, COATS 

and MILLINERY 

are beginning to arrive, and should 
prove interesting to every girl who 
takes pride in her personal appear- 
Bnce. 



Orders by mail will receive prompt 
and careful attention. 



When in Boston 

Lunch at the 

CONSIGNOR'S UNION 

25 Temple Place 

Luncheon 11-3 Afternoon Tea 3-5 

Home-made Bread, Cake, Pies, etc. Served 
and on Sale. 



Advertise 



LEAVES 




Vol, xxxx 



I 

I 



M 




1 




TWO STUDIOS 



164 

,'TREMONT 
■ STREET' 
Telephone Ox- 
ford 2687 




RT in relation to PORTRAIT 
PHOTOGRAPHY is the 

reaction of beauty, grace and 
intelligence, as expressed in the finished 

portrait. 

Onr advanced 1915 styles we honestly believe 
wi|I appeal to you. Special discount rates to 
Laseti Students. 



■ ■.". 

TREMONT 

STREET 

Telephone 

Oxford 858 




Our Stock Never Gets Old 

NEW GOODS ARRIVE EVERY DAY 



tm 




smwwm 

WHQirSAiE 



Mftmonds 
Watches 

:$iker.Good« \ 
Combs 
Cut GI&m 
Coral Jeweliry 

. Reman Pearl* 
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Vanity Cases 
Photo Frame* 
Leather Goodb 
Pouiitaia Fen* 
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Chafing Dishes 
Percolators 
Parisian Ivory 



■ 



H 



Oar Watch m& Jewelry Repair Departments da 
the Ibest Work at very lew prices 



mm 



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MR* F. F* 0AVIDSON 

MJB10ENDALB 



LASELL LEAVES 



225 



A. SHUMAN & CO, 



The Service Store, Boston 



Tailored Apparel for 
College Girls of 
Rare Distinction 



Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabrics — 

Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 

Splendid Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



We Can Please You 

Come ancTSee for Yourself 

Dry Goods, Small Wares, Dress Goods, Silks 
Velvets, Linings, Laces, Gloves, Ribbons, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Hosiery, Underwear, Millinery,Cloth- 
ing, Hats, Caps, Shoes, and Garments of every 
description. 



P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-135-137-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 



■^ 






Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

1314 Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



V^: 



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PIANO COLLE CTIONS 

HELM 

"SYLVAN SKETCHES" 

60c. 
LIND 

"THE SILENT MERE" 

60c. 
MESSAGER 

"DANCE SUITE" 

60c. 

PUBLISHED BY 

CIk Boston music Company 



26 and 28 jffL BOSTON, 

WEST ST. /tffi^y MASS. 

TELEPHONE OXFORD 1561 



226 



LASELL LEAVES 



NEARLY A CENTURY IN 



CARPETS AND RUGS 



Few concerns in this country have so long a business 
record and none in Floor Coverings. 

A large, well selected stock, shown by experienced 
salesmen and the same methods that won the respect and 
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Quality considered, it is our purpose not to be under- 
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EVERYTHING IN FLOOR COVERINGS 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS GO. 

646-650 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St. 



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Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Waists, Furs and Sweaters 



GARMENTS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 
A SPECIAL FEATURE 




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Price $5.50 



10% discount to students and faculty of Lasell. 



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{kSELL ]!m/ES 



"DUX FEMINA FACTI" 



Vol. xxxx 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., MAY, 1915 



No. 8 



Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 
FRANCES HARRIS 



MAUDE HAYDEN 



Local Editor 
ROSE BAER 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



Editor-in-chief 
CAROL RICE 

Associate Editors 

Art Editor 
EDITH HODGES 



Subscription Editor 
JESSIE SHEPHERD 
Assistant Subscription Editor 
MARGARET POWELL 

EDNA CHRISTENSEN 



Assistant Art Editor, CHARLOTTE WHITING 



Assistant Local Editor MARGARET ALLEN 



Personal Editor 
HELEN MERRILL 



Exchange Editor 
KATHERINE ALLEN 

Assistant Exchange Editor 
MARGARET BELT 



Staff Photographe r ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



Field Day Scenes(fronUspiece) 

Literary 

Locals 



CONTENTS 

Things Worth While 

Personal 

Editorial 

Exchanges 

Supplement 



228 
229 
234 



237 
240 
238 
243 
245 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar 

Thomas Long 

A. Shuman & Co. 

Pinkham & Smith 

P. P.Adams 

Schirmer 

T. E. Moseley Co. 

Meyer Jonasson & Co. .. 
John H. Pray & Sons Co. 

Chandler & Co. 

Jordan Marsh Co. 

Thayer, McNeil Co. 

C. F. Hovey & Co. 

English Tea Room 

Nye Park Inn 

A. T. Bridges 

The New Shop 

C.W.Thompson Z. 

Cottrell & Leonard 



Inside front cover 
Inside front cover 

235 

235 

235 

235 

236 

236 

236 

252 

252 

253 

253 

253 

253 

254 

254 

254 

254 



W. F. Hadlock 

Capodanno & Albano 

C. A. Donovan 

Elliott W. Keyes 

Hayden 

Newton Ice Co 

Geo. J. Barker Lumber Co. . 
Jones, McDuffee & Stratton 

George C. Folsom 

Damon 

H. S. Lombard 

Carpenter, Morton 

George P. Raymond 

Maugus Printing Co. 

Houghton-Gorney Co. 

Allerlei 

Consignor's Lunch 

L. P. Hollander 



254 

254 

254 

254 

254 

254 

254 

254 

254 

255 

255 

255 

255 

255 

256 

Inside back cover 
Inside back cover 
Inside back cover 




SCENES FROM FIELD DAY 



fcittram 



LIFE THREADS 

Time was a watcher. A wonderful loom 
it was that he watched so keenly, a loom 
whose treadles no foot pressed — a loom 
whose swiftly flying shuttles no insensate 
machinery made to fly to and fro in their 
swift passage through the war of days and 
years, carrying the multi-colored threads 
of human thought and action that made the 
web of personal life and the history of 
peoples. The motive power was a complex 
of human will, character, and deeds. 

The thread snaps, a life has ceased : it 
varies from the line; a man's thought or deed 
has left the right line of noble, honorable 
living. The pattern is marred and spoiled. 
Individual threads shine goldenly radiant or 
exquisitely hued amid the bewildering maze 
of threads; these are the true, upright, in- 
creasingly beautiful lives of the world's 
best, not necessarily by any means its great- 
est, richest, most celebrated or prominent, 
oh, no; but beyond question its best and 
finest souls. On these and on the sweet 
innocence and joy of children depends the 
beauty of the mystic pattern with its intricate 
design. Time did not weave; men wove the 
web. Time watched. 

One of these myriad threads was that 
of John Saunders' life, — a thread that was 
now somber, now bright and gleaming, now 



dark again, as he obeyed or resisted his 
noblest impulses or instincts. 

One cold, windy day in March, John 
Saunders was walking up and down his 
library, stopping every now and then before 
the grate fire. He was a man of medium size 
with grey hair and sharp black eyes that 
flashed fire when he was aroused. His quick 
yet firm strides bespoke a powerful and 
determined will ; indeed the impression made 
by his whole bearing, was that of complete 
mastery of himself, and it was correct: 
master of himself he was. He had started 
his political life as one of the minor clerks of 
a senator. Here he learned the tricks of 
politics, and as the years went by and he 
rose higher, he became one of the most power- 
ful men in the country. His code of morals 
was of his own making, influenced by 
circumstances. To-day he was very well 
pleased with himself; the one thing that 
he had been looking forward to for years he 
had accomplished. Although he was what is 
called a hard-hearted man, his chief interest 
in life was his only son. The little boy's 
mother had died when he was very young, 
and John Saunders had brought the little 
fellow up himself, for the most part. When 
the boy grew old enough, he was sent to college 
and when he had graduated, his father 
started him off well for a political career. 



230 



LASELL LEAVES 



Today he was on his way home from a distant 
city, to be inaugurated, tomorrow, governor 
of the State. This had been his father's great 
ambition for him; he had been shaping all his 
efforts to this end, and now he had accomplish- 
ed it. It mattered not to him how he had done 
it; his conscience had died long before this. 

John Saunders stopped in his journey 
up and down the room and laughed. What 
was it some fanatics had dared to tell him— 
that some day he would "come to grief "? 
What man anywhere around had been so 
lucky as he? His power reached even to the 
Senate. His was the power behind the 
throne! Whatever he said went. He laughed 
now at these people that prattled creeds, and 
spoke of a God, and of their responsibility 
to mankind. There was no other god than 
money; it was the infinite power; it alone. 
Then, somehow, he remembered a little motto 
that had always been on his wife's desk. 
'Whatever ye sow, that shall ye also reap." 
Each thing sown produces of its kind. What 
a foolishness he thought. He had sown 
deceit, lies, heartlessness ; he had reaped 
money, power, and satisfaction. He had 
swindled, not only men, but widows. His 
motto had been, "Do unto others as they 
would do unto you, but do it first." If any 
thwarted his purpose, he got them out of his 
way by lies, trickery, any available means. 
He had broken many, many hearts, and yet 
he had got everything he had ever wanted ; 
he had even put his son into the governor's 
chair; and today he was happy and satis- 
fied. He had sown tares and reaped rich 
fruit. To be sure he had given money for 
different charities; but this had all been for 
public approval, not because he sympathized 
with the needs his gifts supplied. Some few 
of his friends and business associates had 
sown good seed in their life-field, but had 
only reaped therefrom disappointment after 
disappointment. Why follow, he said to him- 
self, a narrow road when one can walk 
so much more easily in a wide one. Why 



serve God when the Devil makes a much 
better master? 

Father Time was still following the snarled 
and roughened threads. Just then one of 
them snapped in two; woe to Saunders! 

A minute later there was handed to the 
arrogant, successful man, a telegram. Half 
idly he opened it and read: — "Son killed in- 
stantly in serious accident at Rye, New York. 
Come." The flimsy web of life, woven of lies 
and fraud and meaness, was, in an instant, a 
ruin. 

Just at twilight, the cold March wind 
whistling around the corners of the house, the 
fire dead in the grate, John Saunders 
stood in his elegant library looking with fixed 
unseeing gaze, straight ahead, his hands 
clasped behind him. His livid lips moved a 
little, shaping his breath into the sad word, 
"Retribution." 

Margaret Jones, '16. 



SHERBET FOR SALE 

Whenever I think back to my real child- 
hood days, and remember various funny little 
incidents, good or otherwise in intention, 
a series of events which were then serious 
enough, but now seem trivial, occurs to my 
mind. I've often thought of these particu- 
lar incidents and laughed heartily over them, 
not so much at the things themselves, per- 
haps, as at my childish feelings at the time. 
Probably the story of our "stand" will 
interest you most; so I'll tell you of that. 

One day my brother, Hank, (one of his 
boy playmates) and I, made the discovery 
that to be happy we wanted an ice-cream 
stand. Was there ever a child who didn't 
want either a lemonade or an ice-cream stand? 
And didn't the little boy across the street 
have one once, and sell candy, popcorn, and 
peanuts by loads, as we reckoned it? We 
thought of all the fun he seemed to have 
out of it, and the money he had flaunted in 
our very faces. So now we had visions of a 
wonderful ice-cream stand — for who wanted 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



231 



a candy stand? And the most fascinating 
part of the vision of our stand was the crowd 
of wondering children who would hover 
around bashfully for awhile, and then buy- 
buy — buy — buy — while we served them in a 
lordly fashion — and took the money. With 
this vision before us, we rushed to Mother 
for permission, which she gave with a know- 
ing little smile. 

Wild with excitement, we invaded the 
kitchen, much to the cook's disgust, and 
rummaged around for a cook-book. Be sure 
we could expect no help from her. Finally, 
discovering that ice-cream making was too 
long and complicated a process for us, we 
decided, at Hank's suggestion, on lemon-ice. 

"Sure," he said, very pompously. "That's 
easy to make. All you have to do is to freeze 
lemonade. / can make it." 

"All right," I said (my brother was too 
young to have any say in the matter) ; 
"I'll squeeze the lemons, Brother can get the 
sugar and you can draw the water." 

The lemonade was soon made, with plenty 
of sweetening, for we came early to the 
conclusion that as we liked lemon-ice sweet, 
everyone else must. Then came the hardest 
part of the task, — packing and freezing. The 
freezer was in the basement; so down we 
went, Hank carrying the huge pitcher of 
lemonade. 

"Look out, Hank!" I cried. "You're 
spilling that all over the stairs! You'll get 
the dickens!" 

"Oh, you shut up," replied Hank, angrily; 
for he dearly loved to be "boss" and disliked 
interference or criticism. "I'm doin' this." 

I stuck my nose up in the air and marched 
out with a very injured demeanor, thinking 
that if he was going to be so horrid, I'd let 
him do the freezing with Brother's help, and 
I'd take the easier task of finding a place for 
the stand. 

There was an old grocery box in the back- 
yard, which we had been playing with, and 
this I examined carefully with expert eye, to 
see if it would serve as the "stand." It stood 



about waist-high when on end, and the top 
board was about a foot square. It had a 
broad shelf, on the inside, cutting it into two 
equal parts, as every grocery box has; and 
when the box was on end, this made a very 
nice shelf for extra glasses and spoons. I 
always did love shelves! I carried my find 
to the front yard to look for a nice shady spot 
for it, for the day was exceedingly warm, and 
sunshine isn't good for such wares as ours. 

The lawn was large, with many beautiful 
trees, mostly ash and maple, and very smooth 
and grassy, as most lawns are in a small 
suburban town, so that there was plenty of 
shade. But the ideal shady spot must be 
near the sidewalk and particularly smooth, 
or a box with only a square foot of surface 
wouldn't stand there very steadily. There 
was a slight grade in our block and nearly 
every place I chose for my box had such a 
slant that the box perversely turned over. 
I labored hard for a while (you'll agree with 
me that it was labor, if you have ever tried 
it yourself) and the perspiration rolled down 
my face. What with the heat and the box and 
the rest of it, I became pretty well disgusted 
and sat that box down in the nearest avail- 
able spot with a most emphatic downward 
push, when, lo, and behold, it stood as solid 
as a rock, with not a ghost of a wobble. With 
a squeal of delight, I turned toward the 
house, — forgotten the heat, forgotten the 
offence I had received at the hands of Hank. 
I had only gone a couple of steps, however, 
when I saw the boys coming around the house 
with the heavy freezer between them, grunt- 
ing every step of the way. I superintended 
the placing of it, for it wouldn't go into the 
box, and we had to place it so that the box 
should hide it. Then I sent them after a 
burlap to put over the top, while I myself 
went after the spoons and glasses. 

Incidentally, I got hold of Mother's best 
ones, but she saw me before I got outside, an 
I had to make restitution, being thereafter 
allowed to have only a dozen of the most 
ordinary variety. These I carried out on the 



232 



LASELL LEAVES 



tray, and arranged half a dozen of each on 
top, putting the rest on my shelf. After the 
burlap had been properly placed, I thought of 
a forgotten something. 

"Boys," I cried, "We've got to have a sign!" 

"Sure," said Brother, "I got some paper 
and paint for it; en I can make it too." He 
got them. 

Then I said, "We must have a name for 
our stand. What'll we call it?" 

"Let's call it 'Apple-Blossom,' ' suggested 
Hank. 

"Aw, that ain't no name fer any lemon- 
ice stand," said Brother scornfully. "I know 
what; let's call it the 'Scissors Stand.' No- 
body ever had that name!" 

So "Scissors Stand" it was. We traced 
a pair of scissors on the top of the sign, and 
after having decided on ten cents as a fair 
price for a glass of our wonderful ice, we soon 
had it finished. 

It was on Saturday afternoon, when most 
of the business men usually come home 
early, and the larger part of them passed our 
house. But something surely must have 
happened. The afternoon wore on and nobody 
appeared. It made me think of the story of 
"Rip Van Winkle," everything was so quiet. 
The sun kept traveling nearer and nearer the 
west, and as the shade changed we were 
forced to move our stand with it. It didn't 
improve our tempers any; nor did the heat 
improve the ice, for everytime we looked at 
it, which was rather frequently, it had melted 
more. 

As you undoubtedly know, there is a 
little hole near the bottom of an ice-cream 
freezer, which is generally plugged up, but 
which serves to let out any excess of salt 
water. Well, our freezer wasn't plugged, 
which means that, as we moved, it left a 
little puddle of salt-water on the grass. By 
the time we had moved for the last time there 
were about eight of these ominous little 
puddles, which gradually spread and then 
soaked up. We didn't notice it ourselves, but 
Mother and Father, next morning, noticed 



a series of spots on our otherwise fine lawn. No 
customers — not one! And it was growing late. 

"What shall we do"? I said. "Can we freeze 
it again?" 

"Naw!" said Hank, in a disgusted way, 
and gave the freezer a kick, which promptly 
upset it, and a lovely stream of salt-water 
ran out. But it was soon righted. Result: a 
band of dead grass next day. 

"Let's change the sign to 'Sherbet,' ' said 
Brother. We thought that a pretty good- 
suggestion, and promptly changed it. 

Then whom should we see coming down the 
street but Hank's big brother and another 
boy. He made them buy a 'drink' apiece, but 
they wouldn't pay us until we had lowered 
our price to five cents. What dreadful 
things big brothers can do sometimes! After 
they had left Hank sighed, and said, — 

"Gee, what's the use anyway? Ain't 
nobody comin', and the sun's most down. 
Let's drink it." 

So we all started in to drink the luckless 
"sherbet." After a few minutes of gulping 
sounds, Hank looked up, his mouth rimmed 
with "lemon-sherbet" and said, 

"Um-m-m! Don't it taste good?" 

Adolphia Garnsey. 



"THE COURSE OF TRUE LOVE" 

Hidden away in the heart of Germany 
on opposite banks of a turbulent little river 
which curls about the feet of the lofty moun- 
tains, lie two rival towns, — rivals in beauty 
and quaintness, if not in progressiveness. 
The first little town, Bingen, abounds in 
young men who rejoice in the glory of strength 
and youth and, as do all young men, cherish 
the hope of making the Fatherland proud of 
them. The other little town, Dusseldorf, 
shares the same characteristic, with the added 
attraction of many proud daughters, capable, 
good-looking young women. With this situa- 
tion to be considered it is not to be wondered 
at that the youths of Bingen cross the river and 
invade the domain of young womanhood in 
Dusseldorf. Neither is it unusual that in 



LASELL LEAVES 



233 



tli is manner the Bingenites incur the dislike 
and later the hatred of the Dusseldorfers. 

Matters had progressed so far that the 
invaders were never surprised to be wel- 
comed by armed forces of their rivals. Good 
fortune or more probably fleet-footedness had 
thus far saved the contestants in this in- 
teresting match from serious danger, though 
often the well-armed shots had not fallen far 
from their intended targets. Reliance on 
former luck had emboldened these youthful 
knights to such a degree that, when Heinrich 
Hauslein was invited to visit his favorite 
friend one afternoon, the fact that not one of 
his comrades could accompany him., did not 
in the least deter him from his purpose. 

His visit and even his long-drawn farewells 
ended, young Heinrich took his departure, 
to find that a band of grim youths were 
eagerly awaiting to escort him home, dead or 
alive, — the latter particular being of ap- 
parently little consequence. Though armed, 
he knew that certain defeat would attend 
all efforts to withstand his foes; and as the 
safety of flight which had been resorted to on 
so many moonlight nights, fitted him for 
this method of escape, he decided to place 
all hope of eluding them in the swiftness of 
his long legs and later the activity of his 
mind which must in the meantime devise 
an end to his race. These thoughts passed 
through his mind quickly and he was off, 
almost before his enemies had sensed his 
decision. The distance was not far, but the 
strain was beginning to tire him, and he real- 
ized that he could not go much farther. His 
eyes searched eagerly in the gathering dusk 
for some refuge and he espied not far away a 
little church where he knew daily services 
were held in the afternoon. A final sprint 
and he had gained the door and entered the 
nearest pew. 

One arm on the seat in front of him, he 
held his revolver fast in his other hand, and 
awaited the arrival of his pursuers for he 
felt sure that they would follow him. Nor 
was he disappointed, for the young Dus- 



seldorfers though for a time baffled by this 
sudden move, had at last taken up the game 
again and now filed into the dim little church, 
a grim, dusty, hard-breathing line. They 
were sure of their success now, but they had 
not reckoned with young Heinrich's fertile 
brain. He recognized the minister as a friend 
of his father's who resided not far from the little 
church where he conducted his daily service. 
Sure of his hospitality, Heinrich had 
decided to accompany him home and 
perhaps make a call on him, the length of the 
call to be determined by the obstinacy of his 
pursuers. His call was not a lengthy one, for 
his followers soon perceived his intentions 
and realized their own failure. Perhaps the 
kindly old doctor wondered at the vagaries of 
his young guest, but Heinrich decided, from 
the twinkle in his eyes, that he understood a 
number of things, of which he said nothing. 

Margaret Allen. 



THE VOICE OF THE RAIN 

The wind calls like a spirit — ■ 
The sea, like mystic song; 
But the falling rain is like a voice, 
Murmuring all night long. 

For the wind's way one may follow, 
The sea no man may bound; 
But the rain is gentle minister 
Between the skies and ground. 

Rising, mist-clad and silent, 
From land and sea, it bears 
The offering of their fragrances — 
The perfume of their prayers. 

Then, with its myriad blessings 
For the myriad-praying plain — 
Each drop an answer to a call — • 
Earthward returns the rain. 

The wind is like a spirit, 

And the sea is a mystery, 

But the blessed rain is a living voice 

That speaks through the night to me. 



•Ex. 



"When early Spring from Winter laughing leaps, 
'Neath the dead leaves the sweet arbutus creeps. 
These withered leaves that in late autumn died, 
Have well protected April's blushing pride. 
So 'tis in life, beneath the coldest brow 
May beat a heart alive to friendship's glow, 
And, like the forest flower, is better found 
Deep hidden, 'neath the leaves that strew the ground." 

L. L. L. 




Tuesday, April 13, 1915 — Vacation over! 
School started 8.50 A. M. Only five girls to 
stay at school over vacation. The Washing- 
ton party report a good time. 

Wednesday, April 14 — No more "gym." 
Rising gong returned; ice cream will not be 
denied us. 

Thursday, April 15 — No 1.40 lecture to- 
day or for the next two Thursdays. Such 
rejoicing. Dr. Southard, formerly a member 
of Wellesley faculty, and a graduate of John 
Hopkins, gave her first lecture on "Sex 
Hygiene," at seven o'clock in the chapel. 
It was most interesting. 

Friday, April 16 — Try-outs for Canoe Club. 
In the evening at eight, we were fortu- 
nate in having Madame Szumowska- 
Adamowski entertain us with a Chopin 
Recital for the benefit of the Polish Relief 
Fund. She gave a preliminary talk on 
Polish history and on the genius of Chopin. 
After a short intermission she played with 
great power the following program: 



PROGRAM 



Ballade 

Prelude 

Two Mazurkas 

Etude 

Polonaise 



G minor 
D-flat Major 



F minor 
A-flat major 

Mme. Adamowski's young daughter assisted 
by Hala Zach and Florence Hauslein sold 
Polish flags. By her own efforts she has 
raised nearly $1,000 for her country. 
The evening's entertainment was one of the 
rarest treats Lasell has ever enjoyed. A 
reception followed in the parlors, where we 
had the privilege of meeting this truly gifted 
artist. 

Saturday, April 17 — A "hare and hound" 
race which the "hares" won afforded much 
fun this afternoon A party visited the 
Boston Art Museum. In the evening a 
party went to the "Bluebird" and the usual 
party attended Symphony. 

Sunday, April 18 — Party to Newton Hospi- 
tal to sing. 

Monday, April 19 — The Marathon racers 
passed through Auburndale about one o'clock. 
Everyone out to watch them. 



LASELL LEAVES 



235 



Tuesday, April 20 — Usual "blue Tuesday." 

Wednesday, April 21 — Party to "Tales of 
Hoffman," given by the English Opera Com- 
pany. Reports say it was fine. 

Thursday, April 22 — Dr. Southard gave the 
second of her important lectures on "Sex 
Hygiene." 

Friday, April 23 — Party into Boston to see 
a German play. 

Saturday, April 24 — Party to "Carmen." 
Usual symphony party. Several parties or 
picnics on the river. Only one really counts, 
however, namely the Special-Senior Party. 
The classes left Cushman at 4.30 for Riverside 
where they found canoes ready to take them 
up the river to the picnic grounds. After the 
girls had eaten heartily and played a game of 
tag they returned to the boat house, making 
harmony (?) all the way. A general "rough 
house" was in order until the "musicians" 
arrived. The rest of the evening was spent 
in dancing and in eating ice-cream cones. All 
agreed that they had had a jolly good time. 

Sunday, April 25 — Episcopal Church choir 
kindly repeated their Easter music for us to- 
day. We enjoyed it much and appreciated 
the favor. 

Monday, April 26 — Shopping party in the 
morning. 

Tuesday, April 27 — A day of toil. 

Wednesday, April 28 — Mrs. Martin enter- 
tained us this morning by picking out the 
various types of beauty represented in our 
number. In chapel Miss Potter gave us some 
encouraging views in regard to the spread of 
Christianity as a result of the war. The 
Athletic Association met this evening. The 
following officers were elected : — Maude Hay- 
den, president, Sarah Hammond, secretary 
and treasurer. 

Thursday, April 29 — Dr. Southard gave 
us the last of her lectures on "Sex Hygiene." 
We are sorry to have them end, for we have 
enjoyed them. 

Friday, April 30 — A delightful concert in 
the evening by an old Lasell girl, Mrs. 
Baker, assisted by Miss Stanley, violinist. 



Both showed that they had carefully devoted 
themselves to their chosen art. There were 
persistent calls for encores. The program 
was as follows : 




MRS. BAKER 




PROGRAM 




Widnumg 


Schumann 


Im Feld ein Madchen Singt 


Sibelius 


Zueignung 


Strauss 


Mrs. Baker 




Andante 


Godard 


Perpetuo Mobile 


Bohm 


Miss Stanley 




Hans und Grethel 


Mahler 


Fragt mir nicht nach 


Kami 


Conspirators 


En gel 


A Faded Leaf 


En gel 


Mrs. Baker 




Chansonnette 


Thomas 


La Belle du Roi 


Holmes 


Mrs. Baker 




Le Nil 


Leroux 


Mrs. Baker and Miss Stanley 





Saturday, May 1 — A large number patron- 
ized the May breakfast at the Methodist 
Church and apparently enjoyed the affair 
heartily. Usual party to Symphony. 

Sunday, May 2 — Church in the morning, 
vespers at 4 o'clock. Ice cream with straw- 
berry sauce for dinner reminded us very 
pleasantly that Spring is really here. 

Monday, May 3- — We were greatly dis- 
appointed to find it raining when we awoke 
this morning and that consequently Field 
Day must be postponed. The shopping party 



236 



LASELL LEAVES 



went in the morning. Party went through 
the Domino Sugar Refining Factories. 

Tuesday, May 4 — Christian Endeavor was 
conducted by three graduates of the Boston 
University; the large attendance showed 
plainly our appreciation. 

Wednesday, May 5 — The Orphean Concert 
in the evening was a great success. The 
soloist, Miss Neekamp, was gracious and 
pleasing. Under Mr. Dunham's able leader- 
ship the Club gave the following program: 

PROGRAM 

Two choruses from Cantata 

"The Singers from the Sea" Behrends 

Orphean Club 
Love will find a way Brahms 

La Carita Rossini 

Orphean Club and Miss Neekamp 
a Serenade Widor 

b Variations. Widor 

(For Organ and Piano) 
Miss Curtiss and Mr. Currie 

A Birthday Woodman 

Miss Neekamp 
Swan Song from "Lohengrin" Wagner-Shelley 

■ Orphean Club 
Snow Flakes Manney 

St. Mary Magdalene D'Indy 

Orphean Club and Miss Neekamp 

Thursday, May 6 — Lecture on "Law" at 
1.40 o'clock by Mr. E. Porter Russell, a 
friend of Dr. Winslow's. We now know the 
meaning of the term legal. After the third of 
the lectures scheduled for Mr. Russell, we 
hope to know many other things! In 
the evening Mr. Hall of the United Shoe 
Machinery Co. gave us an illustrated lecture 
on Shoe Machinery. We learned many in- 
teresting facts about shoes, from the sandals 
worn many thousand years ago, to the more 
elegant foot-coverings of the present day. 

Friday, May 7 — Field Day today, at three 
o'clock at the Riverside Recreation Grounds. 
It surely was exciting. The first event was 
the hundred yard dash, which Florence 
Evans won; Marion Griffin was second; and 
Lucille Jocelyn came in third. The running 
high jump was won by Carol Rice at four 



feet, six and one half inches. Florence Evans 
was second; and third place was tied. The 
shot-put was won by Bess Emerine at twenty- 
six feet, six inches. Marie Kolb won second 
place, and Katherine Thorpe third. The 
standing broad jump was won by Marion Grif- 
fin at seven feet five inches. Katherine Thorpe 
took second place, and Dorothy Mathias third. 
Carol Rice holds the women's national record 
in the standing broad jump at eight feet, 
two inches. The hop, skip and jump was won 
by Carol Rice at thirty one feet and seven 
inches. Pauline Willis came in second and 
Dorothy Mathias third. The baseball throw 
was won by Marie Kolb at one hundred and 
ninety-three feet. The hurdles were won by 
Carol Rice, Florence Evans coming in second 
and Nellie Woodward third. The Senior class 
were the winners in the events as a whole, 
making 43 points; the Juniors came second 
with 37 points. Party into Boston to see "The 
Rivals" given by the B. U. Juniors. 

Saturday, May 8 — The last Symphony Con- 
cert of the season was attended this evening. 
Susan Tiffany took seventeen girls home with 
her for the week end; we all know what a 
lovely time they will have with "our Sue" as a 
most gracious hostess. The Freshman class en- 
tertained their sister class the Juniors, on a hay 
ride to Ferndale Farms. The Juniors had the 
best picnic lunch way up on a hill, overlooking 
the farms; and were entertained with games 
and contests such as their loyal sisters thought 
would please them. Anna Cornwall won first 
prize in a contest for quickness. The Fresh- 
men surely are starting out bravely in their 
class career; for few classes of ten would 
attempt to entertain a class of sixty, even if 
it were a sister class. The Juniors are proud 
of them, and thank them heartily. 

Sunday, May 9 — Party to Newton Hospital 
to sing. Church morning and evening. 

Monday, May 10 — Usual shopping party. 
Party to Squires' Packing Company. 




CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR CALENDAR 

The Christian Endeavor Meeting on April 
13 was led by Gladys Wilkes, members from 
different classes also taking part. 

On April 20, Susan Tiffany led Christian 
Endeavor. Her topic was "Friendship" and 
was very helpfully presented. 

A very pleasant meeting was led by Kath- 
erine Hoag on April 27. She took as her sub- 
ject, "Loyalty," a topic which is always one 
worth thinking about. 

Prayer meeting on April 6 was led by three 
young men from, the Boston University; Mr. 
Brashares, Mr. Garnet and Mr. Stone. 

Mr, Garnet left with us a message well 
worth remembering, "A Heart of Flame 
toward God, a Heart of Flesh toward others, 
a Heart of Steel toward myself." Mr. 
Brashares followed this by telling in a very 
wholesome way of the joys of religion. Mr. 
Stone sang two very appropriate songs. 



VESPERS 

On Sunday evening, April 18, Vesper Ser- 
vice was in charge of the Missionary Society. 
Mrs. Laura White, a former missionary to 
China, was the speaker. She took for her sub- 
ject, "The New Women of New China," and 
brought out very clearly their ambitions and 
their possibilities. 



Sunday afternoon, April 25, the choir of 
the Episcopal church repeated their Easter 
music, the Cantata, "Jairus' Daughter" which 
was greatly enjoyed by the Seminary girls. 

We were very glad to have with us on May 
2, Dr. Jenkins, of Piedmont College, who told 
us of the mountain whites' eager desire for 
education and of their struggles against almost 
insurmountable difficulties. 



The Interdenominational Study Book for 
the year is Mrs. Labaree's "The Child in the 
Midst." 

At a recent meeting of our local Missionary 
Society the topic of the hour was "The Child 
at Play and at Work." Mrs. G. M. Winslow 
contributed her message in verse; we have 
begged the privilege of printing her poem, 
which appears in the Supplement of this 
number. 





DIT0R1A 




"Clean-Up-Week." What does that mean 
to most of us /girls in school? To most, it 
means just a/week, set apart from the rest 
of the weeks in the year, for a general clean 
up to be carried on by residents of the village, 
or by paid workmen. Auburndale is not our 
home, we do not live here all the year, so 
why should we care! But other people do 
live here, do care, and do enjoy seeing well- 
kept lawns and clean walks and streets. 
Little do we realize what a tiny scrap of paper 
will do to the appearance of a walk, street 
or lawn. The dropping of it may be a thought- 
less or an accidental act, nevertheless that tiny 
scrap of paper stands out clearly" and the 
effect is the same as if thrown there on pur- 
pose (a thing which a Lasell girl would never 
do.) 

Think of what an untidy looking place 
Auburndale would be if every girl in school, 
as well as every member of the faculty, 
should walk up Grove Street from the sta- 
tion every day and should accidently drop a 
piece of paper! A splendid hare and hound 
trail, but oh, so useless and unattractive! 
Why not be more careful about dropping 
paper and also, seeing to it that other people 
are just as careful. 

There may be some girls to whom these 
remarks won't apply and we are very glad 



we have such girls among us. However, 
this suggestion will apply to all, "Pick up 
every piece of paper, large or small, that is 
where it shouldn't be and either place it in 
the refuse barrel, or carry it back to school 
and drop it into a waste paper basket where 
it originally belonged." This process is so 
easy and has such a delightful reward — a 
clean village. 

In connection with this subject, some- 
thing which is uppermost in all minds at 
this time of year, may be brought up and 
that is Commencement Week. With all 
the old girls and so many mothers and 
fathers coming back, don't you think it 
would be fine if we could have every room 
looking just as spick and span as possible? 
It really doesn't take but a very little work 
or very little time to dust and straighten up a 
bit. And don't let us forget the corridors 
and the wee scraps of paper that are so easily 
coaxed out of our hands. 

So let us all join in the "clean-up," both 
in the village and in school. Just to prove 
how original we are, why not extend "clean- 
up" from one week to fifty-two? Surely, it 
would meet with approval. 



With almost every month there comes some 
holiday ; now in May we think about Memorial 



LASELL LEAVES 



239 



or Decoration Day. During the Civil War a 
great many women of the South decorated 
the graves of their dead soldiers, and so in 
1868 when John A. Logan was commander- 
in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, he 
decided to continue this thoughtful idea by 
appointing a national holiday. He set the time 
for the thirtieth of May, but some of the 
southern states have chosen a different date 
earlier in the month on which to remember 
their dead. Memorial Day has done much 
to keep the veterans of the Civil War together 
and has also given the people now living in 
the United States a splendid chance to show, 
in part, their appreciation of the patriotic 
sendee rendered in the Civil War. 

Don't some of us take that day, coming as 
it does w r hen we are rather tired out from 
school work, as one for vacation alone with 
no thought at all as to why it is celebrated? 
It is said that some children don't even know 
why July 4 is put aside for a national holiday, 
but think of it as a day when they buy fire- 
crackers, pistols, and fireworks in order to 
make a big noise. 

We have heard in different talks this year 
that loyalty is perhaps the finest of all quali- 
ties. Josiah Royce says that to develop 
loyalty we need to have something to be loyal 
to and that, since our country is such a large, 
wonderful one it would make the possibilities 
of developing loyalty so much greater be- 
cause we choose such a splendid and high 
object. We must remember, also, that we of 
the younger generation have had no actual 
sacrifices to make for our country which is 
constantly doing so much for us. The 
United States is so strong and independent 
that she does not continually call on her 
citizens to make sacrifices for her. So, just as 
the members of the body become weakened 
and in time disappear through disuse, so our 
patriotism may lose all its vigor if we do 
not do something now and then to keep it 
active. 

When we consider that it is less than sixty 
years from the beginning of the Civil War and 



that there are still those left to tell us of the 
bravery and courage shown during the Civil 
War and that at the same time when a day 
comes which has been set aside for paying 
tribute to their great sacrifices in saving this 
country for us, we are willing to forget them 
entirely and go to some auto race or base ball 
• game, we shall then understand what a short 
time it takes for a flame of patriotism as 
bright as that was sixty years ago to die down 
Probably in some great crisis we would respond 
with just as much enthusiasm as they did, 
but let us keep our hearts warm with the fire 
of patriotism and on the national holidays 
remember what they stand for and do some- 
thing which will show that we haven't lost our 
appreciation of what has been done for us. 




THE BIRD CLUB 




FINISH OF THE 100-YARD DASH 




People sometimes say that April is the 
month of "smiles and tears," but with Lasell 
girls it seems to be wholly a month of sun- 
shine, at least we are sure such would be the 
testimony of the following happy brides : 



Nebr. Mr. and Mrs. Fenton's new home will 
be in Mogadore, O., after June 15. 

Bon voyage to these happy young people! 



On April 7 Vera Bradley, '11, became Mrs. 
John Bradford Findlay at Stonington, Conn. 
After May 12 Mr. and Mrs. Findlay will be 
at home at Harold Street, Haines Park, 
Mamaroneck, N. Y. 



On Saturday, April 17, occurred the marriage 
of Florence Swartwout, '09 to Mr. Francis 
Falgonner Thomassen at Port Jervis, N. Y. 



We are again indebted to Doctor Bragdon 
for this interesting word in regard to three 
"old girls": "Margarita Buehner Sailor, '06 
reports George, Jr., twenty -one months old, 
and Meta Buehner Nobel, '06, reports Robert 
Jr., twentythree months, and Edward John, 
five months old. Clara Davis Lounsbury, '98 
reports a new baby January 3. We congratu- 
late the happy parents, also the children, for 
it is a good deal to be well born!" 



The marriage of Ruth Thresher, '14 to Mr. 
Robert Rice Jenks occurred on Thursday, 
April 22, at Pawtucket, R. I. 



Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Harris announce the 
marriage of their daughter, Alma Marguerite, 
to Mr. Allan Thornton Hanscom, Woon- 
socket, R. I. Mr. and Mrs. Hanscom will 
be at home after July 1 at 21 Summer St., 
Woonscoket, R. I. 



Welcome little pilgrims! We trust you will 
not be strangers to Lasell many days, and 
some happy year that you will all be Lasell 
girls. We will call the roll : Alice Frances 
Seller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Seller 
( Dorothy Wells, '09) born Tuesday, March 2 ; 
Margaret Lavinia Knight, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. W. E. Knight (Ella Puchta, '10), 
born March 12; and Thetis Stiles Ashley, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Ashley 
( Elizabeth Cobb, '04) , born March 24. 



On Saturday, May 1, Marian Halstead be- Also thru the kindness of Doctor Bragdon, 
came Mrs. Harry Weimer Fenton at Ponca, we learn that Helen Danforth Baker has a 



LASELL LEAVES 



241 



little son "Bobby Baker" about a year old, 
her other boy being seven. Katherine Jencks, 
'0-1 has been spending the winter in Florida 
and Edna Frank Vajen has been touring 
California. 



One of the rare women of earlier Lasell 
days has just passed away, Miss Mary A. 
Parkhurst, '61. The Wellesley Townsman in 
its tribute characterizes Miss Parkhurst as a 
"gentle New England lady of rare refine- 
ment and cultivation." She had spent much 
of her life in educational work and impressed 
her strong and beautiful character upon many 
pupils. Our tender sympathy is extended to 
the sorrowing friends and relatives. 



Through Dorothy Hartshorn, '14 we learned 
of the tragic death of Grace Hardy's '04 
brother, Frank, who was acting as athletic 
coach and chanced to be at Cushing Academy 
at the time of its destruction by fire and was one 
of the victims. Our sincere sympathy is ex- 
tended to dear Grace and her family. 



Constance Blackstock, '09 has not yet 
started for her India mission field but is getting 
acquainted with the twins, the little niece 
and nephew, Isabella's '03 children, whom 
she declares very winsome. What she really 
writes is "They are doing splendidly and 
gaining the right number of ounces every 
week." Constance reports having seen Wini- 
fred Smith. Winifred is busy with a club of 
Camp Fire Girls and is doing fine work. Con- 
stance also speaks of Mildred Johnston, '06 
and her school which we have described in a 
former number of the Leaves. 

An announcement from Nora Cox is that 
of her marriage to Mr. H. B. Julian. She is 
living at Marion, O., 241 Bellevue Ave. She 
speaks of her new niece, Eunice's daughter 
who is growing finely. Our best wishes to 
this youngest Lasell bride! 



St. Louis paper gives an interesting account 
of a law case in which she took a prominent 
part. 



So many of our Lasell family attended Ruth 
Thresher's, '14 wedding reception we almost 
feel as if we had had a wedding in the school 
home. All report enthusiastically of this 
unusually fine function and the attractive- 
ness of the fair bride and her manly husband. 



Annie Kendig Peirce, '80 is on the Pacific 
Coast. She is making quite an extended tour 
with her husband, Mr. Silas Peirce, a promi- 
nent member of the Methodist Book Com- 
mittee now in conference in San Francisco. 
Mrs. Peirce loses none of her enthusiasm. 
Of the expositions, she writes, "It is a wonder 
of wonders for situation, landscape gardening, 
architecture, coloring and electric display. 
Without going into a building, it is worth a 
trip to San Francisco. Annie's sister, Carrie 
Kendig Kellogg, '79, has just returned from 
a winter's outing in Aiken, South Carolina. 



In a recent note Effie M. Prickett, '91, who 
has charge of the Department of Archives of 
the Connecticut State Library, gives her 
address as 157 Edward St., Hartford, Conn. 
We are proud of the success of this former 
Lasell girl who has been in the State Library 
since 1906. 



Miss Harriet Freeby, '95 is still busy and 
successful in her chosen profession. A recent 



Katherine Bassett Chandler, in a message 
to Dr. Bragdon, writes, evidently acknow- 
ledging a courtesy: "The list of Pacific Coast 
Lasell girls came today and I no longer be- 
long on that list. I have been living in Lan- 
caster, Mass., since my marriage to John 
Chandler in January, 1914, so am a near 
neighbor to the old school? You may pos- 
sibly remember how homesick I was at Lasell 
the first year and it will interest you to know 
that I'm living 'way off here' in perfect con- 
tentment an absolutey happy life. I have 
my mother with me now and I expect to have 
both Mother and Father here in Massachu- 



242 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



setts before many years. Father is at present 
Commissioner of Public Utilities and Mayor 
of Spokane. I have a wonderful young son, 
Charles Fassett Chandler, now nearly three 
months old and that is another reason for 
our great happiness. Louise Kelly, '07 is a 
Pacific Coast girl now, having married Carl 
Ultes (Old Nat'l Bank Bldg.) of Spokane in 
1914. Helen Huntington Berryhill is at 2436 
Prospect Ave., Berkeley, California." 



We are prouder than ever of our Helen 
Say re, '11 who has just made Phi Beta Kappa 
at Wellesley. 



After many years' absence, Florence Hart- 
well "came back" to Lasell for altogether too 
short a visit. Her present home is in Madison, 
N. J., where she is living with her sister Abbie 
Hartwell Ludlow. 



What a surprise Elsie Doleman, '14 gave 
us recently by walking in with our dear 
President, Ruby Newcomb, '14 who remained 
with us for a short visit and promised to come 
again at Commencement time. 



Marian Shaw is just as nice as ever and 
just as welcome. We never have quite given 
up the hope that she will some day finish her 
course at Lasell. 



Dorothy Canfield, '14 came and left us 
suddenly, spending only a few hours with us 
but we were glad to welcome her and con- 
gratulate her on her approaching marriage. 
(We shall give full particulars later.) 



Annie Crowe Collum, '09 and her husband, 
Captain Collum were kind enough to call at 
Lasell on their wedding journey, Annie 
came again and made us twice glad with her 
real old-fashioned call. They expect to sail 
for England where her husband will go into 
training, preparatory for active service in 
the war. We are glad to have had the privi- 



lege of meeting them for this little visit and 
we sincerely hope that the war will close be- 
fore the husband is called into active service. 



Lucy Curtis, '80 came "almost home" this 
term, that is, she was on the campus as the 
guest of Minnie Ransom Wagner during 
Sadie Ransom Hazelet's visit. 



Alice Bevin in a recent letter tells of a very 
happy and successful winter in New York 
where she has been a pupil in at the Art 
League. She often meets Helen Ludeke. 
Alice hopes to be at Lasell at Commencement 
time with Gladys Cone. 



Josephine Woodward, '10, is now a regular 
member of the faculty of Whiting Hall, a 
preparatory school charmingly situated in 
South Sudbury, Mass. The principal reports 
her as a most successful teacher. 



Alma Bunch, '13 has been busy in settle- 
ment work and regrets that she cannot be 
with us this June. She speaks of catching a 
glimpse of Marion Joslin , '12 a short time 
ago. 



Bessie Roper Conant sends an outline of a 
course of lectures which she is to give this 
coming summer at Northfield under thejiead 
of "Sunday School Methods." We are glad 
to learn of this forward movement and wish 
her all success. 



Pauline Collins Ham writes from 389 Ver- 
non St, Oakland, Calif., to Doctor Bragdon, 
thanking him for his kindness in furnishing 
her with a list of Lasell girls. She speaks of her 
two dear little children, a girl of seven and a 
boy of three and a half. We are glad to get 
word from these "old girls" and wish a larger 
number would send us word of their ^where- 
abouts and what about. 




A FEW REMARKS FROM US 

Wise-Acres — A very practical, earnest, and 
attractive paper. We like your name which 
is very appropriate. An exchange column 
would add to your paper. 

The Missile — Clever and lively. 

The Boston University Beacon — You have 
exceptionally good stories and poems. Your 
exchange column is too limited. 

The World — A brilliant and complete paper. 
Your stories are greatly improved by the 
accompanying sketches. 

Medford High School Review — Your "Med- 
ford Meddler" is very original as is the whole 
paper. The prize cartoon showed talent. 

The Review (Galveston, Texas)- "The 
Dawn Rose" is very simply and beautifully 
written and is an interesting story. 

The Villa Marian — We are very glad to 
find the Villa Marian for the first time among 
our exchanges. Your Easter number is in 
excellent taste and its literary department is 
noteworthy. The paper is carefully and 
attractively arranged. 

The Budget — Your paper seems to be un- 
evenly divided. Your literary department 
needs more and your advertising department 
less material. 



The Acropolis — Your departmental head- 
ings are clever and you have some very 
interesting stories. 

The High School "()"— The "Q" is a brisk, 
lively paper full of snap. It shows an 
energetic set of students. 

The Archion — The cover is neat and at- 
tractive. 

Stevens School Review — Straight through 
from its simple but effective cover to its final 
clever jokes, The Review is a splendid piece of 
work. The editors are to be congratulated. 

Now and Then — You are fortunate in your 
good stories. A few jokes would give life 
to your paper. 

The Red and Green — Your editorials are es- 
pecially good. Your cover is rather flashy. 

The Scroll — Your cover is very attractive 
and your whole paper is excellent. The cuts 
are good. Your "Seminary News" is very 
clever. 

New Trier Echoes — Can you not find a more 
attractive cover design to match the worthy 
contents of your paper? 

News — Your literary department is re- 
markably good, your exchange column is a 
complete one and on the whole we are well 
pleased with your magazine. 



244 



LASELL LEAVES 



Knick Knacks — We can do nothing but 
praise every department in your splendid 
magazine. It seems to be beyond criticism 
in all respects. 

Les Collines — We wish to congratulate you 
on your excellent literary department. Your 
athletic and exchange departments are also 
praiseworthy. 

The Sassamon — Would it not be an im- 
provement to enlarge your exchange depart- 
ment in order to have it in proportion to 
your other departments? Your advertise- 
ments show active work on the part of your 
business managers. 

The Kyote — You have an appropriate cover 
and a very good magazine throughout. Your 
personals give us a very clear idea of the daily 
happenings in your school. 



A FEW REMARKS FROM OTHERS 

LasellLeaves — Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, 
Boston, Mass. — Your cover for the Christ- 
mas number was distinctly original for a 
school paper and deserves great praise and 
credit. Your advertising department is cer- 
tainly a live wire column, but perhaps they 
can't refuse a good looking young woman 
when she conies to solicit advertisements. 
We suggest frequent changing of such head- 
ings as "Locals" and "Personals" which 
have been run to death and are not in keeping 
with the remainder of your paper. Your 
half-tones are always a pleasure to look upon 
and they always show fine specimens of the 
young women of America. — Knick Knacks. 

Lasell Leaves — A splendid paper from cover 
to cover. The prize stories are especially 
interesting and show the result of this ex- 
cellent plan for developing the literary de- 
partment. — The Scroll. 

Lasell Leaves — Your paper is exception- 
ally good. All of your stories are well written 
and the paper is well arranged. The story, 
"A True Heroine" is cleverly "worked up" 
from the original clipping. — Now and Then. 
The story, "A True Heroine" in the 
January Lasell Leaves, Boston, Mass., is very 



well written. Some jokes would probably im- 
prove your paper. — The Gleam. 

Lasell Leaves from Lasell Seminary of 
Boston is a paper extraordinary; 

Composed entirely of girls is the staff, 
Their stories are fine and their jokes 
make one "laf" — X-Ray. 

Lasell Leaves — Boston, is up to its usual 
excellent standard this month. The depart- 
ment devoted to "Locals" is very complete 
and gives an excellent idea of the school life 
at the Seminary. The two prize stories are 
quite worthy of distinction. — The High School 
Enterprise. 

Lasell Leaves — The stories entitled "A 
True Heroine" and "Only a Brother" cer- 
tainly deserve mention, the former being very 
appropriate for these war times. We heartily 
congratulate the Misses Pope and Christen- 
sen on their success. Your paper has a high 
place in our estimation, but have you no 
joke department? — The Radiograph. 

Lasell Leaves— We enjoyed reading your 
prize story. Such stories are of vital interest 
at the present time. — The Sassamon. 

Lasell Leaves — "A True Heroine" is a 
splendid story, showing a girl's love for her 
country. "Only a Brother" is well written. — 

The Taller. 

The following exchanges have been received : 

The Taller, Maroon and White, Les Collines, 
The Topic, The Tech Quarterly, The Sassa- 
mon, The Academic Observer, Echoes, The Tatler, 
The Reflector, Somerville High School Netvs, 
The Columbian, The Violet, Irene Welling- 
ton Studio, The Red and Green, The Scroll, The 
Medford High School Review, The Missile, The 
Boston University Beacon, The Archon, The 
Oracle, The Iris, The World, The Acropolis, 
Knick- Knacks , The Budget, TheQuincy High 
School, The Gleam, The University School News, 
Vindex, X-Ray, The Villa Marian, The Mirror, 
Kyote, Optimist, Black and Red Review, Radio- 
graph, The Hermonite, The Folio, The Clarion, 
Central High News, Garnet and Gray, The Gro- 
tonian, Elgin High School Mirror, The High 
School Review. 



GvWYSr 1 




VG^ 



di> 



FOR ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS 

"Once a Lasell girl, always a Lasell girl" 

All articles or "bits of gossip" for the Supplement should be sent to the 
Supplement Editor, Lillian M. Packard. 



The "Committee for Special Plans" during 
Commencement Week, June third to eighth, 
urges and invites you to show your loyalty 
and school spirit by attending as many exer- 
cises as possible. Come with or without your 
best friend. Make this a record year for the 
reunion of old girls. 

Lela Goodall for the Committee. 

Saturday, May 22 

GLEE CLUB CONCERT 

Saturday, May 29, 10.00 A. M. 

RIVER DAY 
Monday, May 31, 4.00 P. M. 
MAY FETE 
Wednesday, June 2, 8.00 P. M. 
COMMENCEMENT CONCERT 
Thursday, June 3, 3 to 5.30 P. M. 
ART EXHIBIT, STUDIO 
HOME ECONOMICS EXHIBIT 
SWIMMING EXHIBITION 
Carter Hall 
8.00 P. M. 
ALUMNAE FROLIC 
Saturday, June 5, 8.00 P. M. 

SENIOR RECEPTION 

Sunday, June 6, 10.45 A. M. 

SERMON BEFORE THE GRADUATING CLASS 

Abraham John Muste, B. A., B. D. 

6.15 P. M. 
COMMENCEMENT VESPERS 

Henry Turner Bailey 

Monday, June 7, 8.00 P. M. 

CLASS DAY EXERCISES 

Cards necessary 

Tuesday, June 8, 10.45 A. M. 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 

Address 

Charles Reynolds Brown, D. D. 



12.30 P. M. 

SINGING AT THE CROW'S NEST 

2.30 P. M. 

REUNION OF THE ALUMNAE AND 'OLD GIRLS" 



DR GORDON'S MESSAGE 

It is a red letter day in our calendar when 
we greet again our friends from whom we 
have been separated for months or years. 
That day is enriched with happy memories. 
It is a joy to live again the experiences through 
which we have passed together, experiences 
that retained some of their most precious 
possessions to bestow them upon us only when 
the years had given to us a deeper apprecia- 
tion of their value. Some events in our lives 
are like wise parents who keep priceless family 
jewels hidden away until the children be- 
come of age. Then when the day arrives they 
bring forth the precious treasures, made more 
precious by the years of waiting, to adorn 
the person of the loved one. Friends of other 
years, we rejoice with you in the new meaning 
which you are gaining from the old memories. 

Isn't it a joy, too, to see the new expressions 
of power and beauty that have come into the 
faces of those whom we have not seen since 
they took the coveted diplomas on commence- 
ment day? Perhaps the expressions are not 
neiv. Perhaps they are only the flowering 



246 



LASELL LEAVES 



of that upon which we looked with admira- 
tion and expectation years ago. The promise 
has been kept. The courage and nobility and 
strength which were predicted in the faces 
into which we looked, have now been achieved 
and actually expressed in terms of life. 

Friends, we welcome you to your old places 
in the home circle. We rejoice with you in 
the memories of the past, in the joys and 
achievements of the present, "and the end is 
not yet." 

Dr. Gordon's weekly Chapel Talks have 
meant much to many of you and you will be 
glad of another one in the "Message" of this 
month It will interest those of you who know 
him as a friend to read what a Lasell girl who 
visited his summer home wrote about it in 
The Greeting. 

On the Train from South Hero 

I am leaving behind one of the beauty 
spots of earth, "Lindenmere," the summer 
home of our pastor, Dr. Gordon and his wife, 
where I have been a fortunate guest for the 
last ten days, days full of good cheer, rest, and 
inspiration. I arrived at sunset, and we drove 
through the pretty village of South Hero, with 
the Green Mountains of Vermont on one side, 
by wondrous fields of grain and clover, thrifty 
farms and beautiful trees, down a lane by 
Doctor's garden (it is a good one, too) , 
through the woods, where there are over 
twenty varieties of shade trees which are the 
home of many birds, and on to the hospitable 
cottage, from the veranda of which I gazed 
spellbound at the broad expanse of Lake 
Champlain, with its several islands now dark 
green against the glowng sky. Across the 
lake the myriad peaks of the magnificent 
Adirondack Mountains, seemingly painted in 
a hundred shades of blue, and the soft gray 
greens of the foot-hills in the middle dis- 
tance, where stands Hotel Champlain and 
Cliff Haven, whose lights begin to gleam with 
those of the hotel at Ausable Chasm further 
south, and of the citv and barracks of Platts- 



burg, the light houses standing sentinel as the 
darkness deepens. By and by the moon 
shows through the trees, and the woods and 
the lake take on a new glory. 

Bed-time comes all too soon, and we 
gather by the big fire-place if cool, otherwise 
by the friendly lamp, and Doctor reads aloud 
while we knit and sew ; then one of the Psalms 
is read, and after a prayer of thanksgiving 
and thought of those at home we say good- 
night, looking out once more at the lake and 
stars and dear old trees ; and listening to the 
swish of the waves against the great rocks we 
fall asleep — and then it is a new day! and in 
such a place. 

I fear my motto was, "Eat, drink and be 
merry," but Mrs. Pastor is a wonderful cook, 
and the most delicious things came out of the 
oven of that jolly little cook-stove. Near-by 
farms supply milk and cream and eggs and 
chickens, and delicious berries, red, white 
and black. Doctor has a garden. I never 
knew before what peas might be! Sometimes, 
out-of-doors, we had for supper bowls of 
bread and milk, new sweet-clover honey, in 
the comb, with cream thereon, of all delicious 
"eats" the most delectable; and little spicy 
cakes — surely it was good to be alive. The 
days were very busy. Doctor worked in his 
garden, or on his beloved boats, or went to the 
farm for supplies, and we read and tramped 
over the rocks, or sketched, or received callers 
from other camps, or took naps in the cozy 
hammocks. After dinner (we seemed to be 
always eating) , a drive, or perhaps a long trip 
in the motor boat, such a dependable hospi- 
table one, which Doctor runs and thoroughly 
enjoys. It is always ship-shape and such fine 
times we had in it when it was not too windy. 

Before I take up the routine of my daily 
living again, I cannot forbear this tribute to 
"the end of a perfect day," of true friendliness 
and cheer, of a week of charming days, of a 
riot of color and fragrance, the memory of 
sky and lake and woods and a home where 
the love of God abounds. 

Nellie P. Draper, '84. 



LASELL LEAVES 



247 



MICHIGAN LASELL CLUB 

The Michigan Lasell Club held its second 
annual reunion and luncheon at the beauti- 
ful new Detroit Athletic Club, on Saturday, 
May 1. This year the Toledo, Ohio, girls 
were invited to join us and several were 
able to attend. After a delicious luncheon a 
short business meeting was held, the election 
of officers being deferred until the fall meeting 
which is hoped will prove a more favorable 
time. 

A very interesting letter from Doctor Wins- 
low, telling the present Lasell news was heart- 
ily enjoyed; also a telegram from Miss Potter 
which was greatly appreciated. 

Our president, Mrs. Ella Puchta Knight, '10 
being unable to be present, the vice-president 
Mrs. Edith Watkins Dunk, presided and 
proved a most capable and entertaining 
presiding officer. Each one in turn was called 
upon to give her "First Impressions of Lasell" 
and the "Influences of Lasell" upon her life. 
Many humorous and interesting incidents 
were related. Every one seemed to thoroughly 
enjoy herself and is looking forward to the 
next reunion. 

Those present were : 

Mollie Taylor Rathbun, '94, Toledo, O. 

Minnie Peck Caulkins 

Edith Watkins Dunk 

Marion Cole McKenzie, '01 

Edessa Warner 

Cora Nicholson 

Lurella Krentler 

Millie Belle Switzer Brown 

Hulda Naumann 

Irene Stroh 

Eleonora Stroh 

Elsie Huebner Haas, Toledo, O. 

Nellie Burge 

Josephine Clapp Bellows, '13 

Bernice Hettrick, Toledo, O. 



port eleven present, a good time and a plan to 
hold three extra meetings a year at the homes 
of the members in order that they may get 
better acquainted. The officers elected were: 

Mary Potter McConn, '05, President. 

Elizabeth House MacMillan, Vice pres. 

Emma Christensen, Secretary. 

Marion Joslin, '12, Treasurer. 



AN OREGON CLUB 

The Lasell girls of Portland, Ore., and 
vicinity had a reunion and luncheon at Hotel 
Benson at 12.45 o'clock on Saturday, May 15. 
for the purpose of forming a Lasell Club. A 
hearty welcome to this new chapter. The 
meeting was. called by a committee, the 
members of which are: Marjorie Read, Con- 
stance Davis, Rachel Chambers and Nettie 
Roulstone. A complete report will appear 
later. 



TWIN CITY LASELL CLUB 

The Twin City Lasell Club held its annual 
luncheon on Saturday, April 17. They re- 



The following song written for the New 
England Luncheon is printed in full by re- 
quest: 

REUNION SONG 

Tune, Fair Harvard 
There are moments in life which we love to recall, 
There are hours which we fain would prolong; 
There are days filled with sunshine and gladness and joy, 
There are days when our life is a song. 
Chorus. 

Oh! memories rare. 
Oh! memories dear. 
And sweeter than all the rest 

Are the hours that we've passed in our dear old Lasell 
With the friends that were truest and best. 
Oh! our loved Lasell, 
Our beloved Lasell, 
Oh! the days of our dear old Lasell, 
Though we wander and roam 
Far away from our home. 
We'll be true to our loved Lasell. 

Though f know not the fate that the future will bring 

Whether sorrow or joy is for me, 

Happy memories still, I recall at my will, 

Then contented and happy I'll be. 

Chorus. 

Then here's to the health of the girls of Lasell 

Here's success to their plans every one. 

And a happy reunion An regions above. 

When our days upon earth shall be done. 

Chorus. 

Ellen Webster Painter, 5 / . 



248 



LASELL LEAVES 



AN APPRECIATION 

Every school and college owes a debt to its 
alumnae and former students. Their loyalty 
shown in many ways is one of its greatest 
assets. Their successes are her successes, 
their failures are her failures. The list of 
sisters and daughters on the registers is far 
better than a written recommendation. Their 
presence at reunions and commencements is 
an inspiration. 

Lasell is no exception to this and nothing 
delights her more than the frequent notes of 
appreciation that come through the mails and 
the ever increasing number of those who re- 
turn to help her celebrate the commencement 
festivities. No classes are more loyal than 
those of the fifties and sixties, and they have 
shown it not only by their presence but in 
more material ways. The scholarships made 
possible by the legacy of five thousand dollars 
in the will of Charlotte A. K. Bancroft, '57 now 
becomes available. This last year also the 
class of '57 has given one hundred dollars for 
an organ scholarship of seventy-five dollars 
and one for stenograhy for twenty-five, and 
has renewed them for another year. Lasell is 
grateful for the confidence thus shown in her 
and considers it a privilege to help by this 
means the girls who will appreciate this 
assistance. It would be a fine thing if the 
alumnae association, the Lasell clubs, or 
individuals could be persuaded to follow this 
example. To the two organ scholarships 
already provided for the coming year there 
should be at least one each for piano, vocal 
music, violin and art. Think about it. Could 
one hundred dollars be spent more satisfac- 
torily? 

Much as Lasell would like to see what could 
be done with "a million dollar endowment" 
she is not asking for herself but she would be 
happy in being able to grant more of the many 
requests which come from ambitious girls 
for an opportunity for a better education. 
Write the registrar if you would consider it a 
privilege to help. 




PORCH LIGHT AT FRONT DOORWAY 
GIFT OF '96 

This is our first class letter, and has been 
prepared through the kindness of Louise 
Barnes Douglass. 

NEWS OF '96 

CARA SAWIN SWEET regrets greatly not being 
able to attend Commencement this year, especially 
since it has been her sincere wish for a re-union of 
'96 for many years. Cara and Mr. Sweet are just 
leaving for a very extended motor trip, lasting perhaps 
a year. They are to tour the Lincoln Highway and 
plan to visit the Yellowstone Park, National Glacier, 
Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, Tacoma, Alaska, Salt 
Lake City, California, The Grand Canyon of Ari- 
zona, The Canadian Rockies, and hundreds of other 
places. Most of the trip is to be taken in their car. 
They pass through so many states of the Union, that 
Cara hopes to see many of her old Lasell friends. She 
hopes the dear old class of '96 may have a wonderful 
re-union sometime, and sends her best wishes to all 
the "old girls." 



BESSIE HAYWARD is teaching Algebra and 
Arithmetic in the High School at Peabody, Mass. 
Grace Loud, '95 is supervisor of Drawing in the same 
place. Bessie spends her summers at her old home in 
Temple, N. H., which she bought after her mother's 
death. Just now she is one of the census enumerators 
in Peabody and has about two thousand people on her 
list. This will keep her quite busy. She has learned 
to play the pipe organ, and this summer has a chance 
to play a large organ in one of the churches in her home 
town. This year she will make a special effort to attend 
Commencement. 



LASELL LEAVES 



249 



ELLA WILSON COMSTOCK has just moved 
into a newly built home in Richmond, Ind. She is a 
busy wife, mother, and citizen. Her daughters, Wini- 
fred, eleven, and Kathleen, "half past three," keep 
her fairly well occupied. Ella is President of an Art 
Association which brings a monthly exhibit to their 
Public Art Galleries, and is Regent of a chapter of the 
D. A. R. She. frequently sees Lestra Hibberd Saxton, 
also Edith Blair, who teaches Spanish in the Cincinnati 
Public Schools. On a recent visit to her sister Marie 
Wilson Beardsley and her two children. Elizabeth and 
Henry, Ella saw Blanche Kelley, who is the head 
woman worker at the University Settlement and is a 
busy person. Marie sees Emma Goll Dacy and Martha 
Solari Grote who spend their winters in New York 
She sends all sorts of good wishes to any of the girls 
"re-unioning," but Boston is too far away for her this 
year. 

ANNE CUSHING MAYO is still living in Fox- 
croft, Maine, but Mr. Mayo has sold his business 
there, and they may move elsewhere. She hears often 
from her roommate, Sara Hayden Carleton, who lives 
in Chicago and has two fine children. Maude Mayo 
Bentz lives in Montclair, N. J., and there are a great 
many Lasell girls living near there, whom she sees. 
Anne has no children. Her only little one died about 
eleven years ago. She regrets that she has neglected 
to keep up her music, for it was her plan to retain her 
interest in it. Lestra Hibberd Saxton's playing, she 
still remembers with pleasure, and wonders if Lestra 
has kept on studying. Anne has been her own maid 
for the past four years, and enjoys it. The cooking 
lectures, that used to seem such a bore, have proved to 
be quite helpful. She does not expect to get to Com- 
mencement this year, but sends her love to one and all 
the girls. 

ETHEL LOUD is a busy first grade teacher in 
Everett, Mass., her old home. Although she has 
taught sixteen years, she still finds it interesting. Grace 
spends all the week-ends with her and they are chums 
as well as sisters. Three year ago Bertha Lillibridge 
Merrill (of '95) and her family of three interesting 
children spent a month with Grace and Ethel on the 
coast of Maine Bess Roper Conant, who lives in Rox- 
bury, has frequent chats with Ethel over the telephone. 
Bess has two little girls, Theta and Constance, and a 
very new little son. Julia Tulleys Harm writes Ethel 
and occasionally she sees Josephine Chandler Pierce. 
She hopes to attend the "Alumnae Frolic." 



mining towns and lumber camps, where she soon 
learned to consider clean sheets a luxury, instead of a 
necessity, and where table napkins were conspicuous 
by their absence. As they visited many places where 
there were no churches, they took a big tent with them 
and on rainy days the congregation were obliged to 
raise umbrellas, and sometimes, a heavy gale would 
cause the tent to collapse. A small suit case organ was 
taken also, at which, Louise would preside, if an or- 
ganist could not be found. She says music was never 
her forte, and her occasional discords were startling. 
They were sometimes taken for a travelling show and 
she does not wonder. Later, her husband became 
Superintendent of Mountain work of the Southern 
Presbyterian Church. His territory covered parts of 
eight states, extending from Maryland to Alabama. 
They made their home in Winchester, Ky., as it was a 
central place. Now they are living in Staunton, Va. 
a hilly town, full of schools and delightful people. 
When the girls from the "Mary Baldwin Seminary" 
file into the front pews of their church, Louise feels 
homesick for the old Lasell days. Last fall Mr. Hud- 
son and Louise took a course in the Bible Teacher's 
Training School in New York. She saw Blanche Kelley, 
who is doing well in her settlement work. Louise has 
just had a visit from her sister, Alma, with whom and 
her father, she usually spends her summers at Nantucket 
Mass., where she sees Mabel Case Viot, '95. 



KATE PENNELL HULL has just moved into a 
new home in Oklahoma City, where she has been living 
for over a year and a half, and expects to live per- 
manently. Twenty-six years ago it was prairie land, 
and now has a population of sixty thousand, with beau- 
tiful residences, good shops, and all paved streets. 
Her husband is an orthopedic surgeon and Kate is 
greatly interested in the work he does— the straighten- 
ing of little club-feet, crooked backs, and similar 
deformities. Her son, Pennell Cox Price will be thirteen 
in June. He is nearly as tall as his mother, is big and 
broad, a member of the Boy Scouts of America, and 
very athletic. Aside from social duties, and those of 
her church guild, she lives a very domestic life, and 
belongs to no clubs. She enjoyed greatly a visit from 
Josephine Chandler Pierce and her husband in Febru- 
ary, and hears often from Grace Bliss Stewart, and 
Ettiemay Pierson Robertson. "Kit" sends her love 
to all the girls, and says that if any of them are ever out 
that way, it would give her great pleasure to see them. 



LOUISE HUBBARD HUDSON has had many 
interesting experiences since she became a preacher's 
wife. At first, Mr. Hudson was Superintendent of 
Home Missions in a section of West Virginia, and 
Louise used to often accompany him on his travels to 



MARY CRUIKSHANK TOVVNSEND is very 
sorry that she has no news for the Leaves. She has been 
living in Canada since November 1911. Dr. Townsend, 
her husband, is Superintendent of "The Jordan 
Memorial Sanatorium" in River Glade, New Bruns- 
wick. 



250 



LASELL LEAVES 



JULIA TULLEYS HARM has been living for the 
past two years in the little town of Bloomfield Nebraska. 
Housekeeping, and the care of her little son, Robert, 
occupy most of her time, although last winter, she was 
able to take up the study of piano, and found time each 
day for reading. Automobiling is one of their chief 
pleasures, and they hope soon to resume it, as the great 
snow storms of February and March made the roads 
impassable at times, and blockaded the trains for days. 
Small Robert loves the rides, and last summer, made 
the trip to Council Bluffs to visit his grandparents and 
devoted Aunt May. In Council Bluffs, Julia sometimes 
sees Frances Bowman Gerner, and Grace Beebe Hoag- 
land, who lives in Omaha. Mr. Harm, she says, is 
much of a home man, and devoted to his wife and boy. 
He tells her that years ago, before the town was there, 
he used to herd cattle on the prairies. He has since 
become a ranch-man and is now a banker, with Julia's 
brother for partner. At the time she wrote, he had 
driven a "bunch of cattle" to the ranch, twenty miles 
away, and was enjoying the outing with his pony for 
a few days. 

LOUISE BARNES DOUGLASS was obliged to 
break up her home in Brookline, near Boston, three 
years ago, on account of ill health. She has since lived 
at her mother's home in New Hampshire. This winter 
being much better, she attempted to renew her youth, 
by learning the modern dances, and having the 
"Mumps. ' An accident to her hip.brought her gaieties 
to an end, and she is just getting about, after being 
confined to the house since the last of February. She 
regrets that she was unable to accompany her husband, 
who left for California May first, and that she cannot be 
at Lasell in June. While living in Brookline, she used 
to keep in touch with Lasell, especially as her sister 
Grace Douglass, now Mrs. Murray, was a student there 
for two years. Louise met many of the students at that 
time, and many of them came to her home. Lasell is 
still fortunate, for they were dear girls. She hopes to 
see Lillian Wetherell this summer, and hears sometimes 
from Gertrude Smith Mitchell, who has two children, 
and from Myra Davis, whom she used to see, when living 
near Boston. She says "Let us all plan now for a 
'96 celebration in 1916." 



ANNIE HACKETT is leaving the first of May for 
California and will not be able to come to Auburndale 
in June. The past year has been spent at home with 
her mother, and she has spent much time on languages, 
which are her hobby. Thanks to the war her plans for a 
winter in Italy have been abandoned. Annie hears 
occasionally from Frances Bowman Gener, who lives 
in Council Bluffs, and has two little ones to keep her 
busy. Sadie Farnsworth Gleason lives in Portland, 
Oregon and Annie hopes to see her this summer as she 



returns from California. She heard indirectly from 
Ruth Kimball, who is married and lives in Clarinda, 
Iowa. Mame and Nell MacDonald, still live in Du- 
buque. Nell is Mrs. Whitney. Annie has spent much 
time abroad, in the past few years, and was very sorry 
to miss seeing Nellie Wilson Richmond in Rome. Nellie 
was staying quite near, her too. Annie says "why 
can't '96 have a re-union next year? Our TWEN- 
TIETH anniversary. "Horrors!" 



BESS BAILEY VAN ORSDALL is leading a very 
quiet and happy domestic life. For the past eight 
years, her home has been in La Rue, a village in central 
Ohio. Bess' husband is a physician, and they have two 
little daughters, Helen, ten years of age, and Nellie 
Margaret, seven. These two girls often hear about 
Lasell from their mother, and Bess is hoping that some 
day, they may become loyal daughters of her Alma 
Mater. Bess hears occasionally from some of her 
class-mates and is extremely sorry that she cannot be 
in Auburndale for Commencement. 



MARGIE SCHUBERTH has been living in Pasa- 
dena, Cal., for the past few years, and they have re- 
cently built their own home there. Last year, she went 
back to her old home in Ohio, for the first time since 
she left, was later joined by her father and mother, and 
spent the summer in Michigan. Pasadena has a flourish- 
ing Lasell Club, made so probably by the presence of Dr. 
Bragdon, who lives there. There are not many mem- 
bers, whom Margie knew well at Lasell, but they al- 
ways have very pleasant meetings. Dr. and Mrs. 
Bragdon, Belle, and Miss Ransom are usually present. 
In the past three years, she has seen Belle Bronson John- 
ston, and Ella Ampt Hamann, and hopes to see Blanche 
Kelley, this year. Many of her old friends will probably 
visit California, this year for the Expositions, and Mar- 
gie hopes that all those who find themselves in the 
vicinity of Pasadena will be sure to look her up. 



ALICE CLARKE DODGE has a little daughter, 
Elizabeth, who is too young for Alice to leave to at- 
tend Commencement. Her oldest daughter, Bar- 
bara, is eleven, and her son, Richard, is eight. They are 
all delighted with the new baby. Family cares have a 
tendency to make her neglect her club and church 
work just now, as she feels that the children need her 
attention. She sometimes sees Bessie Roper Conant 
whose husband is secretary of The Massachusetts 
Sunday School Association, and to whom, Bessie is a 
great help in his work. Susan Hayward Brown, who 
lives in Worcester, and has two sons, and whose latest 
amusements are horse-back riding, and learning the 
new dances, and Ida Trowbridge Fuller, whose small 
son attends the same school as Alice's boy, Richard. 
Their sister has just married the brother of Mary 



LASELL LEAVES 



251 



Goodwin Olmstead, '03. Alice is planning to spend the 
summer at their summer home at Humarock Beach in 
Scituate. 



JOSEPHINE CHANDLER PIERCE is living in 
the same house in which she lived when at Lasell, 
the same house to which she used to take the girls at 
vacation times to sleep late and upset the regime of 
housekeeping, as she now realizes. Jo was bridesmaid 
for Clara Creswell in Denver, also for Kit Pennell in 
Atchison, when she became Mrs. Price, then later, 
matron of honor for Nellie Briggs, who married Jo's 
cousin. Nellie's first born, nearly two years old is 
Jo's namesake. Her mother died in 1901. and she 
found herself in the position of house-keeper for her 
father and brother. Two years later, her brother 
married a chum of Grace Washburn's, and they have 
always lived just across the street. Jo adores her little 
nephew and niece. Her husband, whom she married 
in 1906, travels for a publishing house, and as they still 
live with Jo's father, it is ideal, as she is never left 
alone. Jo is very proud of her big husband, and thinks 
him most worthy of being one to whom the Allerlei was 
dedicated. "Those unknown men." Jo and Mr. 
Pierce have just returned from a nine weeks trip to 
California. She had some nice times in Washington 
with Grace Bliss Stewart, who is spending the winter 
there in an apartment hotel. A week was spent with 
Kit Pennell Hull in Oklahoma City. Kit and Jo have 
always been the dearest friends since their Lasell days. 
At Salt Lake City she had hoped to see Alice Ball 
Groesbeck, who had been there for several months, but 
had left the very day before Jo arrived. She spent a 
delightful day with Ivah Davis Frost in Topeka. 
Ivah's husband, daughter, son, and her home are all 
delightful. In Denver, they visited Clara Creswell 
Blakeney, and fell in love with all the Blakeney family. 
The boys are sixteen and fourteen and in the High 
School. Edith Starkey Wheeler had visited Clara not 
long before. In Kansas City, Ettiemay Pierson Robert- 
son, who was there for the winter, called upon Jo and 
told her all about her boys. A few hours in Chicago 
were spent with Beulah Shannon, who was there for a 
few months. Beulah's home is in Fitchburg, Mass., 
and Jo and she are still great friends. Jo regrets that 
she didn't have time to see more of the girls and is 
especially sorry that she was not aware that Marge 
Schuberth was in Pasadena, for she would never have 
passed her by. Jo says, "I am not writing all this for 
The Leaves, I am writing it for OUR CLASS LETTER. 
Here's to the letter of '96! Please do let's make an 
effort, Girls, to make it a success. Here I am writing 
away at half past eleven, with no thought of bed, lost 
in thoughts of those old days. Good-night-Good luck- 



"May every morning seem to say — There's something 
on the way, and God sends love to you." 

Yours in '96, 
Josephine Chandler Pierce. 

P. S. I shall surely be at Commencement in June, if 
possible. Why don't more of you come? "Marie 
Barnes" and I have been the only loyal ones for some 
time. I saw Anne Cushing Mayo at the theatre in 
Boston awhile ago — told her she had grown younger. 

Jo. 



THE CHILD AT WORK AND PLAY 

Children playing in the meadows, 
Children romping 'neath the trees; 

Happy voices, merry laughter 
Borne upon the balmy breeze. 

Deep, dark midnight in the factory, 
Children toiling 'neath their loads, 

Growing old in soul and body. 
Babies, treading dreary roads. 

Sad the cry of wasted childhood, 

Youth's glad birthright snatched away; 

May a goodly share of playtime 
Make for them a brighter day. 

But the echoes from the meadows 
Of the laughter and the song 

Sound a minor note of warning — ■ 
"Children playing all day long." 

Soon they will be men and women, 
These children playing all the day, 

Will they still be playing, playing. 
Frittering their lives away? 

Let them early learn the blessing 
Of hard work along with play. 

Learning that the joy of service 
Sheds a glow along life's way. 

Sheds a glow that shines eternal, 

Lighting up the darker side 
Of this strange old world where shadows 

Settle down and long abide. 

Then dear memories of playtime. 
Of green meadows and glad song, 

Will brighten all the years that follow, 
Youth's sweet echoes lingering long.] 

But the daily work accomplished. 

And some service, true and fine. 
Will most surely lead our children 

Onward into life divine. 

Clara A iistin Winslow. 



252 



LASELL LEAVES 



LASELL STUDENTS 

Will Make No Mistakes 
In Depending Upon 

New England's 
Greatest Store 

FOR THEIR VARIOUS NEEDS 



Here one may choose from 

unequaled assortments of 

Clothing Furnishing Rugs Pictures 

Artwares Trunks and Luggage 

and the many other things so frequently 
needed during college days 



Best of all, selection here is never from 
commonplace stock but from the best that 
Europe and America can produce 



Jordan Marsh Company 



BOSTON 



Tailored 

HATS 

New Models for Misses 
$10.00 and $15.00 




Believing that the plainest tailored hat 
should have as much style and individual- 
ity as the most elaborate dress hat, Chan- 
dler & Co. represent the best models of 
Paris and London — yet at very moderate 
prices. 

Cfjantrler & Company 

151 Fremont Street, JSoaton 



LASELL LEAVES 



253 



C. F. Hovey Company 

Summer, Ghauncy and Avon Streets 

BOSTON, MASS. 

OUR MILLINERY 

Combines Style and Quality 

New Hats in 

Sailors, Pokes, Turbans and 

Tricones 

Dress Hats Afternoon Hats 

Tailor Hats 

Hair Hats with Flowers 

Large Sailors with Wings 

Maline Hats with Handsome 

Bows and Flowers 

$10.00 to $21.50 



The Plastic Shoe 




(Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 




In Low or High Cut 
and also in Pumps 



The Plastic Shoe 
is the result of 30 
years of study in 
the search for a 
shoe that will help 
all foot troubles and 
still retain a grace- 
ful appearance. 

The Plastic Shoe 
assists one to walk 
as nature intended. 
It removes the 
strain and ache 
resulting from walk- 
ing or standing in 
ill fitting shoes. 



Thayer, McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



When You Visit Lasell Stop at 

NYE PARK INN 

46 GROVE STREET 
Between the Seminary and Station 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 
FIRE PROOF GARAGE 



254 



LASELL LEAVES 



CHINA AND GLASS 

The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in this line 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glass 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits every season by our buyers to the 
best makers in Great Britain, France, Germany, Austria and Amer- 
ica. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS Gallery 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

FRANKLIN, COR. HAWLEY ST., BOSTON 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 

Compliments of 
GEO. J. BARKER LUMBER CO. 



WALTHAM, MASS. 

George C. Folsom 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 

W. F. HADLOCK 
Newsdealer and Stationer 

Developing and Printing 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CAPODANNO & ALBANO 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco. 

331 AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Tel. Con. 

C. A. DONOVAN 

345 AUBURN STREET AUBURNDALE 

Ladies' and Men's Furnishings 
Dry Goods and Small Wares 

ELLIOTT W. KEYES 
PHARMACIST 
Drugs- Medicines-Chemicals-Choice Confections 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 



HAYDEN 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 

College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 

COTTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS and GOWNS 

to the American Universities and 
Colleges, to Lasell Seminary and 
scores of other Academies. 

CLASS CONTRACTS A 
SPECIALTY. 

PULPIT and CHOIR GOWNS. 

Dewton Ice Company 

MILLER BROS. 

Address!" Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 



PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Receipts 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 PORTLAND STREET, BOSTON 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for Price List of over 60 kinds 





CARDS AND GIFTS 

The ^e^w" ^tioi3 

149 TREMONT ST., ROOM 923, BOSTON, MASS. 

Waists and Dresses Made at Low Prices 
WAISTS $3.50 DRESSES $8.00 & $10.00 

C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 

iflugic dealers; 

Announce their Removal to 

2B Park Street, Boston. Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Three doors above their old store. Send for our recent 
catalogues. Mail orders filled the same day as received. 
Music sent on selection if desired. 



LASELL LEAVES 



255 



SCHOOL 
STATIONERY 



Note Books 

Students' Paper 
Fountain Pens, etc. 



Engraved and Printed 



Programs 



Invitations 



Dance Orders 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON 7 SQUARE 



BOSTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 686 Haymarket 



SPORT COATS 

MACKINAWS 

SERGE MIDDY SUITS 



SPECIALTIES 

FOR 

COLLEGE GIRLS 



Send for Illustrated Booklet 

Henry S. Lombard 

22 to 26 Merc ants Row 
BOSTON, MASS. 




Ladies are delighted 

with the results of using Camp- 
bell's Stain on Floors, Furni- 
ture and Woodwork. 

Gives superb finish, brings out 
the natural grain of the wood. 
Write for color card 

Carpenter-Morton Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Established 1882 



Incorporated 1904 



GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 Boylston Place, Boston, Mass. 

College Dramatic Work a Specialty 
Telephone Oxford 145 



Jflaugus 
printing 
Company 

TOdleslep 
JtlasSacfmsetts 



256 LASELL LEAVES 



Telephones Hay market 2311-2312 



Flowers 
of Quality 



HOUGHTON -GORNEY CO. 

:-: Florists :-: 



119 TREMONT STREET, 

[Park Street Church] 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Specialty 

Flower Shop of Boston 



FLOWERS • TELEGRAPHED TO ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Free Delivery to Lasell 




















The AIXERLEI of the Class of 1915 is now ready for distribution. 
As only a- limited edition has beeti printed, it is earnestly requested that 
you place your order at once with Bess Emerine. 

. 

This book is the best that has ever been published by a class at 
LaselL It contains 188 pages and nearly 300 illustrations. 

The price is $2.00, Postage 25 cents extra. 



— • • •- 



L P. 

202 Boylston Street 



The New Spring Designs in 

DRESSES, SUITS, COATS 

and MILLINERY 

are beginning to arrive, and should 
prove interesting to every girl who 
takes pride in her personal appear- 
ance. 



Orders by mail will receive prompt 
and careful attention. 



When in Boston 

Lunch at the 

CONSIGNOR'S UNION 

25 Temple Place 

Lunchec Af ternoon Tea 

ne-made Bread, Cake, Pies, etc. Served 

1 ie. 



in the 




KM VDLoXX XXoNDoS SOS 



TWO STUDIOS 



164 
TREMONT 
STREET 
Telephone Ox- 
ford 2687 




^^S^RT in relation to PORTRAIT 
PHOTOGRAPHY is the 

realization of beauty, grace and 
intelligence, as expressed in the finished 
portrait. 

Our advanced 1915 styles we honestly believe 
will appeal to you. Special discount rates to 
all Lasell Students. 



161 

TREMONT 

STREET 

Telephone 

Oxford 858 



41 



Our Stock Never Gets Old 




WHOIESALE 
*T RETAIL 



CHARGE 

ACCOUNTS 

OPENED 



Diamonds 
Watches 
Silver Goods 
Combs 
Cut Glass 
Coral Jewelry 
Roman F earls 
Ebony Goods 



ARRIVE EVERY DAY 

Vanity Cases 
Photo Frames 
Leather Goods 
Fountain Pens 
Brass Goods 
Chafing Dishes 
Percolators 
Parisian Ivory 



Our Watch and Jewelry Repair Departments do 
the best work at very low prices 



MR. F. F. DAVIDSON 
AUBURNDALE 




I.ASELL LEAVES 



257 



A. SHUMAN & CO. 



The Service Store, Boston 



Tailored Apparel for 
College Girls of 
Rare Distinction 



Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabrics — 

Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 

Splendid Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



(r 



Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

\IV 2 Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



We Can Please You 

Come and^See for Yourself 

Dry Goods, Small Wares, Dress Goods, Silks 
Velvets, Linings, Laces, Gloves, Ribbons, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Hosiery, Underwear, Millinery, Cloth- 
ing, Hats, Caps, Shoes, and Garments of every 
description. 



P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-135-137-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 



PIANO COLLECTIONS 

HELM 

"SYLVAN SKETCHES" 

60c. 
LIND 

"THE SILENT MERE" 

60c. 
MESSAGER 

-DANCE SUITE" 

60c. 



PUBLISHED BY 



Cbe Boston music Company 



20 and 28 IL BOSTON, 

WEST ST. fl!&^ MASS - 

TELEPHONE OXFORD 1561 



258 



LASELL LEAVES 



NEARLY A CENTURY IN 



CARPETS AND RUGS 



Few concerns in this country have so long a business 
record and none«in Floor Coverings. 

A large, well selected stock, shown by experienced 
salesmen and the same methods that won the respect and 
patronage of parents and grandparents we believe will 
prevail with the present generation. 

Quality considered, it is our purpose not to be under- 
sold by any of our competitors. 

EVERYTHING IN FLOOR COVERINGS 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

646-650 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St. 



Meyer Jonasson & Go 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS.. BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Waists, Furs and Sweaters 



GARMENTS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 
A SPECIAL FEATURE 



SPRING STYLES 




This new model 
comes in Patent 
Leather or Dull 
Calf with low heel 
and pearl button 
ornament. 
Price $5.50 



10% discount to students and faculty of Lasell. 



160 Tremont Street, Boston 



Pastil tout* 



DUX FEMINA FACTI" 



Vol. XXXX 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., JUNE, 1915 



No. 9 



Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 
FRANCES HARRIS 



MAUDE HAYDEN 



Local Editor 
ROSE BAER 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



Editor-in-chief 
CAROL RICE 

Associate Editors 

Art Editor 
EDITH HODGES 



Subscription Editor 
JESSIE SHEPHERD 
Assistant Subscription Editor 
MARGARET POWELL 

EDNA CHRISTENSEN 



Assistant Art Editor, CHARLOTTE WHITING 



Assistant Local Editor MARGARET ALLEN 



Personal Editor 
HELEN MERRILL 



Exchange Editor 
KATHERINE ALLEN 

Assistant Exchange Editor 
MARGARET BELT 



Staff Photographer ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 



TERMS, In Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 

Commencement Day Scenes (frontispiece) 260 Editorial . 

Literary 261 Personal 

Locals 261 Exchanges 



285 
286 
290 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar Inside front cover 

Thomas Long Inside front cover 

A. Shuman & Co. 237 

Pinkham & Smith 237 

P.P.Adams 237 

Schirmer 237 

T. E. Moseley Co. 296 

Meyer Jonasson & Co. 258 

Jonn H. Pray & Sons Co. 258 

Chandler&Co 258 

Varni-Shino Co. 291 

Jordan Marsh Co. 292 

Thayer, McNeil Co. 292 

C. F. Hovey & Co. 293 

English Tea Room 293 

Nye Park Inn 293 

A. T. Bridges 294 

The New Shop 294 

C.W.Thompson ". 294 



Cottrell & Leonard 294 

W. F. Hadlock 294 

Capodanno & Albano 294 

C. A. Donovan 294 

Elliott W. Keyes 294 

Hayden 294 

Newton Ice Co 294 

Geo. J. Barker Lumber Co. 294 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton 294 

George C. Folsom 294 

Damon 295 

H. S. Lombard 295 

Carpenter, Morton 295 

George P. Raymond 295 

Maugus Printing Co. 295 

Houghton-Gorney Co. 296 

Bachrach Studio Inside back cover 

Consignor's Lunch Inside back cover 

L. P. Hollander Inside back cover 




SENIORS IN THE CROWS NEST 
SENIORS COMMENCEMENT MARCH 



Mimm 



THE YOUNG LADY ACROSS THE WAY 

"Aunt Judith, you are worth a trip to the 
Alps!" exclaimed Gordon Allanson, as he 
dropped his traveling bag and sprang up the 
broad steps. "You look as fresh and cool 
as a pink sweet pea, while everyone else is 
looking faded and bedraggled. How on 
earth do you do it? Stand off, and let me 
get another good look at you." 

"Still the same old flatterer, aren't you, 
Gordon! I thought you had out-grown that," 
she admonished, with a merry laugh. "But, 
come, let me take you to your room, and 
after you have taken off that dread- 
ful train-dust, we'll have some ice cold 
lemonade and some of my cakes — baked 
especially for you this morning — out here 
on the veranda. Then we can have a nice 
little chat, and you can tell me all about 
your-self." 

Gordon followed his aunt into the house, 
noting with admiring eyes the graceful car- 
riage of the white-clad and still girlish figure, 
the poise of the lovely grey head, and the 
soft pink and white of her skin. She was 
in appearance an eighteen-year-old, only 
with silver hair taking the place of golden. 

A half hour later Mrs. Reynolds and her 
nephew were lounging in two of the big 
wicker chairs so invitingly arranged amid 
palms and ferns on the broad porch. It was 
the first time in two years that Gordon had 
seen his aunt. He had during that time, 
visited many places — Europe, China, Japan, 
Palestine, Turkey. It was of these places 



and their great cities that he was painting 
glowing word-pictures for his aunt. 

When he had finished, Mrs. Reynolds' 
lips twisted into a quizzical smile. "Gordon, 
in all that travelling" —she hesitated, and 
then continued laughingly, "Isn't there a 
girl connected with some one of those 
places?" 

Gordon broke into hearty, buoyant 
laughter. "Oh, ho, getting a little bit jealous 
are you? He leaned back in his chair and 
remained silent for a fraction of a second, 
as if undecided what to say next. Then, 
seriously, "What is the matter with the girls 
of today, Aunt Judith? The height of their 
ambition seems to be, to appear like men, act 
like men, and do what men do. I tell you — " 

He stopped and gazed with sudden fixed 
interest across the street. His aunt turned 
and saw a young girl strolling up the walk 
of the house opposite. She was gowned in 
white, a splash of pink ribbon, falling in 
cascades, from her broad summer hat, almost 
to the hem of her soft, clinging gown. Her 
very motions suggested irrepressible youth 
and perfect health. 

"Oh," exclaimed Gordon, "I see you have 
some new neighbors!" 

"Why, I wrote you last month that Mrs. 
Adams had moved, and that a new family 
was going to move in. The house and 
grounds have been remodeled so that you 
would hardly recognize the place. Didn't 
you notice that before?" 

"I didn't notice her before," he said simply^ 



262 



LASELL LEAVES 



bending his dark head in the direction of the 
young lady across the way. 

"I'll call on her tomorrow," declared his 
aunt impulsively, "so that you may meet the 
fair stranger." 

And so it was that on the next day, Mrs. 
Reynolds made her first call on the new 
occupants of the former Adams house. 
She told neither the mother nor the girl, the 
reason . why she had not called before, nor 
why she had called on that particular after- 
noon. The outcome could easily be imagined. 
No one meeting Mrs. Reynolds could long 
resist her winning personality; and no one 
meeting Mary Caldwell could long resist her 
lovely, fascinating charm. The formal call 
lengthened to a quite informal duration, tea 
was served, and, when Gordon Allanson 
was seen on Mrs. Reynold's porch, he was 
with neighborly unconventionally called over 
to join them. 

It did not take Gordon and the girl very 
long to get acquainted. They were interest- 
ing and pleasing talkers; both had travelled 
far and wide; both were interested in books 
and art; and they liked each other. The 
conversation gradually turned to the girls 
of the present day. 

"I was talking with Aunt Judith on this 
very subject yesterday," stated Gordon. 
"What are the girls of today thinking of? 
They are so masculine. I spent the last 
month visiting homes on Long Island and 
met dozens of girls. All the same. They 
swim and dive; they drive and hurdle; they 
play golf, tennis and polo; they talk politics 
and want the vote." 

"Oh," ejaculated Mary Caldwell, in a sur- 
prised and slightly injured tone, "So you 
don't want a girl to do anything like that?" 

"Please don't misunderstand, Miss Cald- 
well," he hastened to explain. "It isn't that 
I disapprove of sports for girls, but the way 
in which they go at it. They go into every- 
thing with such superfluous energy that they 
are not only becoming mannish, but are 
wastefully using up too much strength and 



vitality as well. Girls can't do what men 
can and yet they are trying their best to 
out-do us. Why even women's styles are 
becoming more and more masculine. Woman 
isn't feminine any more. I can't under- 
stand why girls want to sacrifice their youth- 
ful loveliness just to be called "good old 
sports.' Take for instance," he added 
gallantly, "Aunt Judith — and you, Miss 
Caldwell. Venus couldn't be more alluring 
— you are both so everlastingly feminine." 

Mrs. Reynolds and Mary laughed ap- 
preciatively at this last remark. But neither 
of the guests noticed the flush that mounted 
to the girl's forehead, or the amused twinkle 
in her soft brown eyes; nor did they notice 
the quick turn in the conversation so adroitly 
accomplished by their hostess. 

"Don't you dare tell," threatened Mary, 
after the callers had gone, as she slipped her 
arm lovingly around her mother's waist 
and drew her into the house. 

This was a beginning of a very happy 
summer for both Mary and Gordon. Hardly 
a day passed that they didn't see each other. 
They went for long drives in the machine, 
Gordon always driving; they went horse-back 
riding, swimming and canoeing. But al- 
ways Mary was the one who cautioned, "Go 
slower," and, "Don't go out so far." 

One warm afternoon when Gordon and 
his aunt were out riding they passed the 
bathing beach and stopped to watch the 
swimmers. 

"By George!" exclaimed Gordon ve- 
hemently. "That girl is going to dive from 
that high tower! She'll break her neck 
sure! 

The girl did dive from the tower, but she 
did not break her neck as Gordon had pre- 
dicted. As she sprang clear of the spring- 
board she opened her well-shaped arms 
with the grace of a bird opening its wings to i 
fly, her head thrown back, her chest wellj 
forward, and her lithe body held as straight 
as an arrow. She seemed to soar through the 
air. As she struck the water, there wasl 



LASELL LEAVES 



263 



only a small splash and a few ripples. It 
was a perfect swan-dive. When she appeared 
above the water again, she struck out toward 
the middle of the lake, using the Australian- 
crawl stroke with an ease and mastery that 
many a man would envy. 

"It was a beauty," admitted Gordon as 
he swung the low roadster again to the 
boulevard. 

His aunt smiled, but said nothing. She 
was thinking hard. 

It was a week later when Gordon ran up 
the front steps of the Caldwell home to ask 
Mary to go for a ride. The maid answered 
his ring and informed him that "Miss Mary 
had gone out to the Country Club for the 
day." He decided he would go after her as 
it would only be a half hour's run. 

A luncheon party was dispersing as he 
entered the club. The young girls of the 
company glanced in frank approval more than 
once at this well-built, athletic young man 
in white flannels. His tanned and clean-cut 
features bespoke clearly love of out-doors 
and its sports. But the keen, clear blue eyes 
never once noticed the glances thrown in 
his direction. Apparently he was looking 
for someone. Some minutes later, as his 
eyes wandered over the golk links, he be- 
came intensely interested in a tall figure 
dressed in white. She had placed her golf 
ball on the tee and raised her driver to swing. 
Such grace, such strength, such suppleness, 
he had never seen displayed by a girl before! 
He could almost hear the whistle of the 
breeze as her club swept through the air, 
the resounding whack as the driver struck 
the ball and sent it spinning, spinning, 
spinning, far down the course. 

"Who is that girl?" he asked of the steward. 

"That one! Why she holds the amateur 
golf championship of the Pacific Coast, and, 
also, for tennis. They say she is one of the 
finest high divers in the country, and can 
ride horseback, too, like an Indian. I be- 
lieve her name is Mary Caldwell, her father 



is- 



Gordon did not wait for the steward to 
finish, but leaving the club-house set -off 
with long strides toward the girl in the white 
suit. She was in position to make another 
exhibition drive when he reached her. 

"Mary!" 

She dropped her club and turned, "Caught!" 
she cried as she saw him standing near her. 

"Why didn't you tell me, Mary?" he asked 
gloomily. 

"I remembered what you said that first 
day at tea, Gordon, and as I liked you more 
than anyone I had ever met before, I decided 
I wouldn't let you know — for awhile, at 
least. I was afraid you would think me one 
of those mannish girls." 

"That's unjust, Mary. You know per- 
fectly well that I 1 — " 

Mary interrupted, raising her hand in pro- 
test, "Just a minute, Gordon. Before you 
say another word, I want to confess every- 
thing. I hold a championship in golf and 
tennis, besides being considered a very good 
swimmer, high-diver, and hurdler. I dress 
very, very mannishly for all these sports, and, 
fastening her eyes on the toes of her white 
boots she continued, "I am a suffragette and 
always shall be. Now, please don't say you 
don't like me any more." She raised her 
big brown eyes beseechingly to his. 

Gordon started toward her. "Mary, you — 
Then he remembered the caddy standing 
grinning at his elbow. "Give me that 
driver, Caddy," he commanded. The club 
given, he drove the ball which Mary had 
placed on the tee whirling far over the hill, 
tossed the boy a dollar, snapped his fingers 
impatiently, and fairly roared, "You chase 
after that ball at double quick time, but 
don't be so quick about coming back." 

The boy smiled knowingly and sped after 
the ball. Fifteen minutes later his little 
freckled face appeared over the crest of the 
hill. He wrinkled his little snub-nose, winked 
turned once more toward the club-house 
and jogged his way back to the locker-room. 



264 



LASELL LEAVES 



"Where is Miss Caldwell?" asked the 
keeper of the lockers. 

"Aw, she's stuck in the swamps back over 
the hill and '11 be in later," answered the 
nonchalant freckled-face little diplomat, as he 
jammed his cap over his eyes and started 
toward the door. 

Edna Christensen 



A MYSTERIOUS PASSAGEWAY 

Helen and Harold were in their upstairs 
study one rainy afternoon, after a very 
exciting game of ping-pong. Harold was 
wandering around the room like a caged 
animal, his hands in his pockets, and a deep 
frown on his freckled face. 

"I'll show you, Helen May, that- — ," 

The silence was so long that Helen, at 
last looked up, to see her brother gazing up 
at the ceiling as if he were "seeing things." 

"Well, Harold Oliver, what will you 
show me?" she asked a trifle impatiently. 

"Oh, nothing. I'm busy now. Keep 
still." 

"I wish that I was busy," sighed Helen. 
"There isn't a thing to do this stupid old 
day. Can't I help you?" 

"If you really want to help you can go 
and get the step-ladder from the cellar," 
said Harold. 

"Why, Harold Oliver Crane, what are 
you going to do with a step-ladder?" cried 
Helen, but Harold had already left the room, 
thinking that it would be better to go down 
to the cellar and carry the step-ladder up 
the three flights of stairs himself. 

"I'm going to see what those two holes 
are for in that ceiling. I have never noticed 
that they were there or that, all around 
them it looks as if there were boards instead 
of plaster," said Harold. 

He placed the ladder under the two holes 
and quickly stepped up. Slowly, with a 
lot of pushing and pulling and many stops 
to wipe the dust, that fell from between the 
cracks into his eyes, he succeeded in laying a 
portion of the ceiling, about four feet square, 
back against another roof. 



"For goodness sake, Helen, there is a 
passageway up to the peak of the roof and 
there are two holes up there. I'm going up." 
He scrambled up the ladder and was soon 
out of sight. 

It was maddening to Helen, an adventure- 
loving girl, to sit in the study and hear 
Harold climbing up the side of the house. 
So, after much manoeuvering to get herself 
and her skirts up the ladder without tearing 
her dress she managed to make her way 
into the hole. 

"Harold, are you there?" she asked. 

"Yes, I'm here," answered a voice from 
above. "I can't find any holes in the roof 
but there is a hole on the other side of the 
peak. It probably goes right back to where 
you are now, but I'm going down just the 
same. This is just a false roof that I am on. 
You stay where you are. "Don't be so 
bothersome." 

"No, I won't," answered Helen. "If you 
can go up there and down, I guess I can. 
I've just taken off my skirt, so, with my 
bloomers on I can go anywhere and not be 
afraid of spoiling my clothes. Is it very 
dirty?" 

"Oh, no!" answered Harold, sarcastically, 
"not at all!" 

"I'm coming anyway, so there," said 
Helen. She, then began to climb and was 
surprised to find how very easy it was to do 
so, as there were slats every little way. "This 
must be an easy way to get to the ridge-pole 
she thought. 

"Are you still there, Harold?" she de- 
manded presently. 

"Yes, I'm here. It's pretty dark over the 
other side so I thought that I would wait for 
you and we could go down together," replied 
Harold. "Careful now, you are almost up, 
and there is a slat gone, so don't feel for it- 
There you are. Isn't it fine up here? Doesn't 
it look nice and dark on the other side? As 
soon as you get your breath we will turn over 
there and go down." 

Presently Harold carefully climbed over 
what would be the ridge-pole of any other 



LASELL LEAVES 



265 



house, but which in this house was covered 
with another roof, and disappeared. Helen 
followed and slowly and carefully, on their 
hands and knees they made their way down. 
Once in awhile a slat was gone but otherwise 
there were no hardships except the cobwebs 
that flew across Helen's face and made her 
hold her breath. 

At last, after what seemed ages, Helen 
declared, "I'm positive that we have gone 
down farther than we came up. Where do 
you suppose we are going? Surely not into 
the study. I have counted at least fifty 
slats coming down." 

"Oh, you are only frightened, Helen, just 
like a girl. I'm not a bit scared," boasted 
the big brother. "Of course we'll soon 
come out right where we started from. 
There, I can see light now, just below me." 

"Oh, I am so glad," gasped Helen, her 
voice shaking a little, "my hands and knees 
are all numb hanging on to these little slats. 
I wish I hadn't come." 

"Now, don't begin that, you know we 
can't get lost in our own house and what is 
more we are at the hole in the ceiling now. 
I am just ready to step off on to the ladder 
and you are four slats behind me. There, 
I'm down. Why! Where am I!" 

At Harold's exclamation, Helen nearly 
lost hold of her slat but managed to take her 
last four steps and stepped out — not into the 
study as she had thought she would but into 
a large room with cement walls, floor, and 
ceiling, and full of wine casks. 

Sister and brother looked at each other in 
surprise. Were they dreaming? Whose 
wine-cellar were they in? Where was the 
door? 

After much hunting and moving of the 
casks of wine, they found a very small door 
which they opened and were surprised to 
find, not a flight of stairs, as they supposed 
they would, but a passageway. This open- 
ing was very long and dark but just inside 
only high enough for a person to stand in. 

Holding hands and stopping once in a 



while, they crept slowly through the passage- 
way. 

After a long silence during which they had 
both nearly fallen down by stumbling on a 
stone or piece of paper, Helen queried tear- 
fully, "Harold, where are we going and where 
will we land? We have walked seven or 
eight miles now, I do believe." 

"I'm sure I don't know where we are," 
answered Harold, "but we have got to keep 
on now. Can you tell whether we are going 
up or down? Oh, Helen, see that light! 
What do you suppose we are coming to?" 

They hurried along and in a few minutes 
were surprised to find themselves in another 
wine-cellar. Much bewildered as to where 
they were and how they were going to get 
back, they stood in the middle of the floor 
and gazed at each other. 

Soon, however, each was looking around for 
a door or window to get out of the cellar. 

"This is just like an Alice in Wonder- 
land story," Helen said. "I wonder where we 
will come out?" 

"Oh, I've found a little rickety flight of 
stairs, Helen. Shall we go up, or shall we go 
back and climb into the study?" 

"Come on," commanded Helen, "I'm 
going up." 

They climbed the stairs and found them- 
selves in another cellar, full of boxes of vege- 
tables and fruits. Somehow this cellar looked 
strangely familiar. 

Whose cellar had an old fashioned churn 
in it? Where had they seen that queer old 
chair before? Why, in grandfather's cellar, 
of course. 

"Harold, this looks like Grandfather's 
cellar. But how can it be, when he lives two 
blocks away from us on the other side of the 
street? Let's go up the stairs and see where 
we come out." They hurried up the stairs 
and found that Helen's surmise was correct, 
for they stumbled over old Tabby, on the 
stairs and when they opened the door who 
should be standing in the middle of the floor 
gazing at them with startled eyes, but 
Grandma. 



266 



LASELL LEAVES 



"Why, Helen! Why Harold! How in the 
world did you get here? Did you come 
while I was out on the front porch talking 
to your mother and go in there to hide from 
me or when did you come?" 

"No, Grandma, we are as much surprised 
to find ourselves here as you are to see us," 
they answered and with many pauses to 
wonder how they happened to land at Grand- 
ma's house they told her what they had done. 

They were still talking when Grandpa 
came in from a game of chess with his neigh- 
bor, Mr. Brown. They pounced on him and 
demanded an explanation of this mystery. 

"Well now," chuckled Grandpa, after they 
had told their story. "I guess you have found 
the old tunnel that was used years ago in the 
war to help the escaped prisoners and others 
elude their pursuers. I remember hearing 
Father telling about this tunnel that was 
between two houses in town but I never 
realized that it started in our house. We 
might go down and see that cellar you speak 
of. I never knew that there was the wine- 
cellar you speak of. in this house. Father was 
always very particular to go for his wine, 
himself. Now I see why. He didn't want us 
to find the entrance to this secret passage 



Remember the frolics, the swift passing pleasures, 
An hour of enjoyment, yet deep in your hearts, 

A wonderful memory, vivid and stirring, 

The image will last, though the picture depart. 

Remember the meaning of each well-spent moment, 

Its deeper significance far ahead lies, 
Hold fast in your memory the sweetness of school days. 

More precious each hour, as the time onward flies. 

Margaret Allen. 




way. 



Jean Simonds. 



MAUD FREEMAN, {Our May Queen) 



THE HEART OF A ROSE 

All through the early summer days, 

The bud of the rose has grown 
From an insignificant bit of green 

To an exquisite flower half-blown. 
Is it not a beautiful bit of art 

With its opening petals curled 
Closely as yet about the heart 

Not quite ready for the world! 
And the beauty yet that it promises 

The richness still to come 
When in its time it has opened wide 

And the rose is in full bloom. 
Then well we know that, where e'er it grows, 

Whatever its name or kind, 
At the base of the petals the heart of gold, 

A heart which all may find. 
So we have passed the moulding days 

Of early youthful years, 
And the flower of womanhood opens now 

With its petals of hopes and fears. 
Let us strive that, when life is at its full 

And the petals wide unfold, 
The base of each thought and deed may be 

A heart of purest gold. 

Marguerite Belt. 



f ■ > 



A SENIOR'S MEMORIES 

Remember the moments of wearisome labor, 

A troublesome problem, a difficult theme, 
Yet greater by far was the joy at completion, 
Success made the toil but a vanishing dream. 




ELIZABETH HILDRETH, {Winner of bread prize) 




^=sw 



A select party of six rilled the school 
machine, May 10, and with Miss Rand as 
chaperone, visited all the places of interest in 
Cambridge, among them being the Agassiz 
Museum, the Germanic Museum, the Me- 
morial Hall, the Longfellow Park, and the 
Mount Auburn Cemetery. 



The Missionary Cafeteria 

Saturday night, May 15, the Missionary 
Society opened their Annual Cafeteria, on the 
lawn between Carter and Cushman Halls at 
quarter past six. Each class had a booth 
where ice cream, sandwiches, salad, lemonade, 
pop corn and candies could be bought. The 
Seniors had the Crows' Nest very attractively 
decorated with their colors. The other 
booths too were prettily decorated with 
banners, flowers and class colors. The affair 
was a great success, and even more money 
than was expected was taken. 



May 18, a large party of girls chaperoned 
by Fraulein Heinrick and Mile. Kokoszynska 
attended a remarkable presentation of "Iph- 
igenia in Tauris" given in the Harvard 
Stadium in Cambridge. 



May 24, Monday, a large party of girls 
went to Plymouth to take a look at Ply- 
mouth Rock and many other historic places 
and things found there. Luncheon on the 
beach was one of the jolly features of this 
trip which was heartily enjoyed throughout 
the day. Much of the pleasure and profit 
of this visit was due to our entertaining 
chaperone, Miss Rand. 



A party of fourteen, chaperoned by Miss 
Collins and Miss Shank attended the wonder- 
ful performance of "Siegfried" given by Mme. 
Gadski, Alma Gluck, Schuman-Heink, and 
Messrs. Sembach, Whitehall, Ruysdael, and 
Reiss, and Goritz, at the Harvard Stadium 
at seven-thirty o'clock on the evening of 
June 4. An orchestra from the Metropolitan 
Opera House supplemented these artists. 



May 28, Friday, at eight o'clock, Marion 
Newland gave a very pleasing song recital. 
She was ably assisted by Mr. Frank Stanly 
Schaub, a senior at The New England Con- 
servatory. The following, program was 



given : 



268 



LASELL LEAVES 



Program 

Aria (Acis and Galathea) 

The Voice of Philomel 

Maman, Dites Moi 

Ich Liebe Dich 

A Rose and a Dream 

Serenade 

Miss Newland 
Feux Fielets 
Etude C Minor 

Mr. Schaub 
Rejoice Greatly (Messiah) 
Ashes of Roses 
To my first Love 
Come to the Garden Love 
Whither 

The Blackbird's Song 
II Bacio 

Miss Newland 



Handel 

Chadwick 

Weckerlin 

Grieg 

Gilberte 

Gilberte 

Liszt 
Chopin 

Handel 

Woodman 

Lohr 

Salter 

Schubert 

Scott 

Arditti 



RIVER DAY 

May 29 dawned bright and calm in answer 
to the many wishes of the crews that the 
wind of the day before would abate. At 
8.50 promptly all started for the boat houses, 
showing their partiality for crews by dis- 
playing their blue, gold or green colors. All 
who could advance the thirty cents an hour 
and, at the same time, secure Miss Warner's 
permission took canoes and made brave at- 
tempts to keep near their favorite crew. The 
Seniors had one launch; the faculty and 
friends of the school followed the race in 
another. 

The three crews were towed up the river 
to the starting place after first exhibiting their 
skill in a short practice before the spectators 
at the finish of the race course. Nellie Wood- 
ward was captain of the gold or senior crew 
taking the place of Isabel Bradley, who had 
had to withdraw on account of illness. 
Florence Evans was stroke. The others of the 
crew were: Lucile Joscelyn, Maude Freeman, 
Bess Emerine, Katherine Thorpe, Clara 
Paton, Evalina Perkins and Ida Laubenstein. 

The captain of the blue or junior crew was 
Carol Rice: Maude Hayden was stroke. 
The rest of the crew were: Adolphia Garnsey, 
Grace Farley, Marion Newland, Marion 
Griffin, Marie Saxton, Mabel Straker and 
Lavinia Fera. 

Francis Harris was captain of the green or 
mixed crew. Cornelia Gaty was stroke. The 
rest of the crew were Florence Gates, Special, 



Elsie Doleman, '14, Risser and Canfield, '17, 
Ray, Attwill and Boehner, '16. 

At "ready, set and stroke" from Mr. Ord- 
way, the coach, the crews were off. The three 
were so evenly balanced that at no time during 
the course was one boat over a half length 
ahead of the others. The girls were in good 
condition and held their stroke very well. 
The captains set a rather even, steady pace 
until the point was passed, when with stirring 
class calls they spurred their girls to a stiff 
spurt. According to the judges the green 
crew was ahead by about three or four feet 
until, with two or three powerful strokes, the 
junior class actually lifted their boat over the 
line. The race was so close, however, that the 
girls did not know who had won but had to 
await the decision of the judges, Dr. G. M. 
Winslow and Mr. E. J. Winslow. Their 
report was that the junior crew came first 
by about one foot, the senior crew second and 
the green crew third. 

Mr. Upham of the Riverside Recreation 
Grounds generously gave the winning crew 
pound boxes of candy and the losers one 
eighth of a pound boxes. These were greatly 
appreciated. Mrs. Rice, Carol's mother, gave 
her crew red, white and blue parasols and 
took them to Ringling Brothers' Circus. 
The girls were enthusiastic over these atten- 
tions. 

The single canoe races were as exciting as 
those of the crews. Since we wanted them 
all to win, it was hard to cheer for anyone; 
it happened often that one girl cheered for 
them all. Dorothy Crane and Jessie Shep- 
herd had one canoe; Edna Edwards and 
Naomi Bradley, a second; Eloise Bordages 
and Eleanor McCarty, a third; and Hallie 
Dickie and Katherine Chase, a fourth. 

From start to finish the race was very close 
between the Edwards-Bradley and the Shep- 
herd-Crane crew, the latter were finally pro- 
nounced winners. 

The day was a big success; the girls and 
teachers concerned deserve great credit. The 
rest of the school thanks them heartily for one 
of Lasell's most thrilling events. 



LASELL LEAVES 



269 




THE FINISH OF THE CANOE RACE 




THE JUNIORS 




THE SENIORS 



270 



LASELL LEAVES 



MAY DAY 

In answer to everyone's hopes, May Day 
was all that could be desired in the way of a 
bright, sunny day. By half-past three the 
lawn was crowded with guests. At four 
o'clock the program began with the pro- 
cessional, "Honor and Praise to the Queen 
of Spring," written by Marguerite Belt and 
sung by the entire school. 

MAY DAY PROCESSIONAL 

Honor and praise to the Queen of Spring, 
Garlands of flowers at her feet we fling; 

Summer is come and our queen today 

Whose praises we sing, is Queen of the May. 

Now a joyous throng, we come to revel in the gladsome 
summer hours 

Nature full of heart, is spreading for us pathways 

bright with many flowers. 

Cares are banished now, for we can welcome naught 

but happiness today, 
Make every heart, make every heart light and every 

eye bright 
Let love and youth and gladness hold full sway. 

For May is queen, for May is Queen, for May is 

Queen. 
Swell then the chorus two hundred strong, 
All hearts shall echo the gladsome song. 
On then, nor pause, in our duties gay, 
Our homage we pay To the Queen of the May 

In festal array Our homage we pay. 
Hail, Queen of the May. In festal array, 

Our homage we pay, Hail, Queen of the May. 

From Carter Hall the classes marched 
four abreast to the throne and then 
divided into two long lines, down which Nell 
Woodward and Florence Evans led to the 
throne the May Queen, Maude Freeman, and 
her Maid-of-Honor, Isabel Bradley. Marjorie 
Winslow made a very sweet Flower Maiden. 
The Seniors, in caps and gowns, each carry- 
ing a long-stemmed American Beauty, the 
gift of the Junior Class, sang then a greeting 
to the chosen queen. 

SENIOR MAY DAY SONG 

With joy and great festivity we come today 

To pay sincerest homage to our Queen of May 

We will ever honor and adore her 

And pledge our loyalty as we all bow before her. 

She's the fairest and the dearest of all 

And all her subjects now before her fall. 

Gladly we now sing before thy throne 

All hail our glorious Queen of the May, 



With hearts full of love we now greet you 
And hope through all your life 
You'll have the same to meet you 
Here's to the maiden of honor, too, 
And here's to one that we love 
Now we pass along in order 
So that all may come before her 
Hail, all hail, our Queen. 



They were followed by the Juniors, all in 
white with bands of blue and gold ribbon 
about their arms as insignia of their class. 

JUNIOR SONG 

To you our May Queen 

We bring heart and hand. 

Sweet queen of our happiest day! 

Of you we'll think 

And remember your charms, 

When we are all far away. 

You are so gracious, so sweet and so true, 

Emblem of our Alma Mater so dear. 

Nineteen sixteen humbly bows before you, 

Our Queen of the May. 

The Sophomores with their gowns orna- 
mented with purple and yellow balloons 
came next and sang the following song: 

SOPHOMORE CLASS SONG 

Down at Lasell 

There is a class, 

Numbers 1917. 

We're all here in a mass 

To wish you, our May Queen, 

The Maiden of our choice, 

All happiness that's possible, 

That's why we rejoice. 

In turn came the Freshmen in blue and 
black, the Preparatories in red and white, 
the Specials last, as Tipperary Maids, greeted | 
the Queen with the song. 

SPECIAL SONG 

Tipperary maidens, we who greet the Queen of Mayl 
Irish are we? Well, we'll show that Irish hearts are| 

gay. 
Among the other costumes bright, our green and white| 

you'll see 
Each lassie in the special class makes this her specialty^ 
Chorus 

It's a gay day, this our May day, 

While we sing to our Queen. 

Let her know her special sujects 

By their costumes white and green 

As we come to meet our sovereign 

Every heart is true, 

While loyalty and love we offer, 

Our May Queen to you. 



LASELL LEAVES 



271 



After these greetings all seated themselves 
on the grass to watch the dances given under 
Miss Warner's direction. The Marguerite 
Dance was very graceful and the Japanese, 
Fairy, and Wood Nymphs Dances were fas- 
cinating; but perhaps the most successful 
dance was that of the Dutch youths and 
maidens; for the click of the wooden shoes 
seemed to please the audience immensely. 
The Maypole lads and their partners in 
genuinely old English costumes, wound the 
intricate maze of blue and white streamers. 




THE MAY QUEEN 

A remarkable Polish dance was then given 
by Hala Zach. This ended the program, but 
not our memory of it; for the fair-haired 
Queen, her stately Maid-of-Honor, the dainty 
Flower Maiden, and the Merry Dancers will 
live long in the hearts of their admirers. 

After the dances came a grand march, led 
by the May Queen, the Maid-of-Honor with 
their attendants, the Senior President and 
Vice-President. It ended by Cushman Hall 
on the Grove Street side where the Seniors 



planted a rose bush. They then gave the 
spade to the Junior Class, in care of their 
Vice-President, Anna Cornwall. The singing 
of the Alma Mater closed the program. 

The May Queen and Maid-of-Honor were 
led in state into the dining-room, after all 
others were seated. The Sophomores had 
decorated the Senior table very prettily and 
presented each Senior with a tiny silver 
frame containing the picture of their president, 
Nellie Woodward. To her they gave, also, 
a picture of the Sophomore president, Jes- 
sie Shepherd. 

The many alumnae and old girls declared 
that this May Day was the prettiest and most 
successful they have ever seen. Thanks is due 
to Miss Warner's persistent efforts. 



Commencement Concert 

Wednesday night, June 2, as a finale to a 
year of good concerts, the very successful com- 
mencement concert was given. The "Elegy 
for four violins," a composition by Mr. 
Goldstein himself, was especially beautiful. 
The girls playing it were accompanied by Mr. 
Goldstein, Mr. Dunham at the organ, and 
Dale Whipple at the piano. The entire pro- 
gram follows: 

PROGRAM 

Part First 

PIANOFORTE. Etude Arensky 

Miss Dale M. Whipple 
VOICE. Gloria Buzzi-Peccia 

Miss Marie H. Klenze 
PIANOFORTE. Valse Impromptu Liszt 

Miss M. Adolphia Garnsey 

VOICE, a. Irish Folk Song Foote 

b. Requiem Homer 

Miss Helen L. Benson 

VIOLIN. Chanson Polonaise Wieniawkst 

Miss Marguerite Hall 

PIANOFORTE. Rigoletto Paraphrase Verdi-Lisz 

Miss Ethel L. Robinson 

Part Second 

VOICE. Down in the Forest Ronald 

Miss Anna L. Cornwall 
VIOLINS. Elegy for four violins Goldstein 

Misses Marguerite Hall, Ruth Harris, Sarah Hammond 

and Ruth Griffin 
PIANOFORTE. Arabesque Debussy 

Miss Katherine A. Hoag 
VOICE. "As when a dove" Handel 

Miss Marion H. Newland 



272 



LASELL LEAVES 



PIANOFORTE. Polonaise in E major 

Miss Pauline B. Rav 
VOICE, a. Lullaby 

b. Ah, Love but a day 

Miss Irene R. Apfelbaum 
PIANOFORTE. Overture, Ruy Bias 
Misses Adolphia Garnsey, Rose Baer 
Dearborn and Helen Benson 



Liszt 

Lieurance 
Beach 

Mendelssohn 
Katherine 



GLEE CLUB CONCERT 

The long looked for May 22 was beautiful 
enough to please the hearts of the most 
exacting. By three thirty in the afternoon 
men and flowers started towards Lasell. 
Happy girls appeared to receive them, to 
show their guests the grounds and interesting 
features of the school and otherwise enter- 
tain them until five or six-thirty when de- 
licious luncheon was served in the dining 
room. At eight o'clock in the gymnasium 
a very well arranged program found ready 
appreciation ; but the clever encores composed 
by the members of the club made an especial 
appeal. Those on "The Faculty," "The 
Daily Program" "The Baseball Team," and 
"The Crushes" were all well done. The one 
entitled, "There is a school in our town," 
setting forth the enjoyment of which we may 
not partake, needs no comment. 

The good-night song by Mildred Cloake 
was a fitting ending to this fine program. 
Miss Goodrich and Miss Benson should feel 
repaid, if the comments of the audience are 
to be believed. 



Miss Katherine Hoag gave a concert in 
the gymnasium on May 26 that was very 
well received. Miss Hoag's work showed the 
result of careful study, and she is to be con- 
gratulated on the splendid program which 
was given. 



PIANOFORTE 

Gavotte (B minor) 
VOICE 

The Sky Lark 

Cradle Song- 



Program 



Bach 
(Old English) 



The Lass with the delicate air 
VOICE 

Aria (from Carmen) 

Bergere Legere 

Jeune Filette 

Du bist die Ruh 
PIANOFORTE 

Arabesque 

Sonata (1st movement) 
VOICE 

Caro Mio Ben 

Mattinata 

Ave Maria 

Oh for a Dav of Spring 
PIANOFORTE 

Polonaise 



Dr. Arne 

Bizet 

Weckerlin 

Weckerlin 

Schubert 

Debussy 
Grieg 

Giordani 

Tosti 

Schubert 

' Andrews 

Paderewski 



TENNIS 



The final of the tennis tournament which 
was postponed on account of rain was played 
off Wednesday morning, June 9. Elsie 
Doleman and Elizabeth Richards were very 
evenly matched and it was not until the last 
ball had been served that it was possible to de- 
cide which was the winner. Elsie Doleman, how- 
ever, took the last set with a score of 7-5 
after winning the first 6-4 and losing the sec- 
ond to Elizabeth Richards with a score of 6-2. 

Elsie will receive a silver cup and will also 
have her name engraved on the school cup. 



THE ART EXHIBITION 

The Annual Art Exhibition was given in 
the Studio, Thursday afternoon, June 3. 
Work in oils, water colors, charcoal, cast 
drawings, monograms, caricature, house-de- 
signing and furnishing, handicraft, glass 
painting, stenciling, pottery and free-hand 
drawings was attractively shown. Those 
whose works were displayed are Evelyn Dun- 
ham, Edith Hodges, Jacquelyn Bickford, Lu- 
cille Grazier, Marguerite Belt, Katherine 
Hardwick, Merveille Gratz, Edna Edwards, 
Gladys Rankin, Elizabeth Richards, Char- 
lotte Whiting, Katherine MacDonald and 
Phoebe Haskell. The exhibit proved that 
the opportunities for studying art at Lasell 
are exceptionally fine. 



LASELL LEAVES 



273 



SWIMMING EXHIBITION 

Thursday afternoon at 2.30 sharp the 
annual swimming exhibition opened with the 
races for speed which Marie Kolb, Helen 
Hardwick, Isabel Bradley, and Harriet 
Frey entered. The race was won by Marie 
Kolb at six and two fifths seconds. She re- 
ceives a silver cup as prize. The spectators 
were startled by a splash when Ruth Boehner 
fell in the water. She stayed there until she 
had removed her dress and shoes and had 
come out in a Lasell Seminary swimming suit. 
The diving which followed was so well done 
that it was hard to judge. The cup was 
finally awarded to Cornelia Gatey. Others 
who entered were Beatrice Marx, Marie 
Kolb, and Ruth Boehner. An exhibition of 
strokes was given by Isabel Bradley; old 
breast stroke, side, overhand, crawl, and 
several others. The long distance plunge 
followed with Helen Hardwick, Cornelia 
Gatey and Marie Kolb as entries. It was 
won by Helen Hardwick with a distance of 
thirty nine feet and six inches. She also re- 
ceives a cup. 

A stirring life saving exhibition followed 
Avhen Marie Kolb rescued Eloise Bardages, 
and Marie Saxton used the Dr. Schaeffer 
prone-pressure method of resuscitation and 
brought her to life. 

The exhibition closed by the following 
girls forming an "L. S." in the water as they 
floated: Margaret Jones, Ruth Boehner, 
Adolphia Garnsey. 



THE HOME ECONOMICS EXHIBIT 

The annual Home Economics Exhibit was 
held in the sewing-rooms and in the practice- 
kitchen on the afternoon of June 3. Com- 
petent guides conducted the many guests 
about the rooms and afterwards took them 
to the lawn where refreshments were daintily 
served by students of the department. The 
display of dresses, suits, hats, lingerie, em- 
broidery and basketry called forth many 
compliments for both students and teachers. 



The results of the year's work must be most 
gratifying as well as valuable. 

In the practice-kitchen rooms was found a 
tempting display of breads of various sorts, 
French pastry, salads, mock roast duck, 
planked steak, canned goods, picnic lunches- 
all of which made one's mouth water. The 
model luncheon displayed in the dining room 
was perhaps the most remarkable feature of 
the display, although the properly balanced 
meal shown in the serving-room excited a 
great deal of interest. The girls in the de- 
partment have evidently received good train- 
ing, and have profited by it. 



ALUMNAE MINSTREL 

The Old Girls and Alumnae showed the new 
girls that they were still very much alive and 
interested in their Alma Mater by giving a 
most entertaining Minstrel Show in the 
gymnasium, Thursday night, June 4, at 
eight o'clock. The entrance of the orchestra, 
alias end-men, caused screams of laughter 
which continued throughout the evening. 
Even now the remembrance of their huge 
song-books marked "Lest We Forget" starts 
us chuckling. We are all convinced that 
"Actions speak louder than words" although 
we do not forget the jokes, the wonderful 
whistling, and the songs, especially that of 
the one who "taught herself to yell." W^e were 
delighted with Margaret Livermore as Inter- 
locutor and enjoyed to the utmost the ballads 
by Sara Shuttleworth and Miriam Flynn. 
It seemed like old times to have Lois 
Brader at the piano. 

The Alumnae's closing songs, school songs, 
cheers and "Alma Mater" ended the happy 
evening. We have decided that if we, by be- 
coming Alumnae, can, in our turn, give as 
much enjoyment to the girls that are to 
follow us, we shall be glad to join the ranks 
of that present lively organization. The 
printed program of this happy affair was as 
follows : 



274 



LASELL LEAVES 



Opening Medley 



Program 

Alumnae and Old Girls 
Interlocutor 
Margaret Livermore 
Ballads 
Sara Shuttleworth Miriam Flynn 

End Men 
Margaret Jones Eunice Votaw 

Amy Brannan Evelyn Schmidt 

Kathleen Knight Mildred Goodall 

Closing Chorus 



SENIOR RECEPTION 

Saturday evening, June fourth, at eight 
o'clock a reception was given in honor of the 
Seniors. The guests were received by Nellie 
Woodward, the senior president, Dr. and 
Mrs. Winslow and Miss Potter. The beau- 
tiful gowns, the flowers and orchestra helped 
to make the occasion a success, long to be 
remembered. Refreshments were served in 
the dining-room by the girls of the Junior 
Class. 



BACCALAUREATE SUNDAY 

Light showers did not interfere with a 
large attendance at the baccalaureate ser- 
vices held in the Congregational church 
Sunday morning, June 6. 

After the singing of "Ancient of Days," a 
favorite processional with Lasell students, 
the opening exercises were conducted by 
Dr. Gordon, the pastor of the church assisted 
by Dr. Butters of the Methodist Church. 

The Rev. A. J. Muste, of the Newton- 
ville Congregational Church, then gave a re- 
markably illuminating and ennobling message. 
As he opened one after another of the 
wonderful rooms in "the palace of life," he 
inspired his hearers with a desire to make 
themselves worthy of entering and enjoying 
their glories. His sermon, in part, was as 
follows : 

"My text consists of two great sentences, 
one from the Old Testament, 'He hath set 
eternity in their hearts;' and one from the 
New Testament, 'We have all come short 
of the glory of God.' He hath set eternity 
in our hearts, infinite, limitless possibilities 
are within us and before us. The tragedy 



of human life is that so often we come short 
of the glory to which God has destined us. 

There are, for example, great realms of 
beauty that the human spirit has hardly 
begun to explore. Nature perpetually per- 
forms miracles before our eyes. How many 
drink in this beauty and become glad with 
the wine of its intoxication? There is the 
mysterious realm of music. Even the great- 
est masters have not yet begun to express 
what it is in music to say to the human 
heart, nor have the greatest critics begun to 
analyze its meaning and its power. There 
is the realm of imaginative literature, poetry 
in particular. How many people even in a 
so-called educated audience know anything 
at first hand of Homer and Virgil, Dante or 
Goethe, Shakespeare or Milton, Shelley or 
Keats? Perhaps we cannot all become 
trained lovers of nature, music and poetry, 
but there are great realms of beauty and 
high, pure joy that each may enter. We sin 
against God and ourselves when we go 
through life blind and deaf to the wonders 
of His world. 

Likewise there are great fields of knowl- 
edge still to be explored, and no age has had 
greater reason than ours to thrill with the 
possibilities of new knowledge that open out 
in mystery and majesty before the mind of 
man. The nineteenth century has taught us 
that the search for truth is endless and end- 
lessly rewarding. As the past was mediaeval 
darkness compared to the light of to-day, 
so shall our age yet seem darkness compared 
to the light that is to be. 

So too the realm of action holds forth end- 
less possibilities. We live in the age of 
telephone, telegraph, wireless, flying mach- 
ines, in an age to which change has become 
a normal condition and that has struck the 
word 'impossible' out of its vocabulary. 
We are to see momentous advances in agri- 
culture, industry, science, mechanics, social 
organization. It is good to be living in a day 
when the human soul realizes that He hath 
indeed put eternity in our hearts. 



LASELL LEAVES 



275 



"Front life bravely, then. Demand great 
things of it. Above all, keep your soul clean 
and high, for if you sin, if you let the body 
grow weak, the mind dull, the soul dirty, 
then there is something of all this beauty 
knowledge, achievement, that you will have 
to miss. Every time you look at an unclean 
thing you dim your eye so that there is some 
beauty in this world they will never see. 
Every moment you waste means that some 
truth will never dawn in splendor on your 
soul. Every time you weaken yourself by 
sin and unbelief, you put some achievement 
forever beyond your reach. And this is 
hell — that there should be beauty, and we 
not see it, truth and we not able to com- 
prehend it, brave work to do and our hands 
paralyzed. 

Remember that great possibilities of de- 
velopment exist for you in the realm of 
character and the soul. Jesus of Nazareth 
is the super-man in whose image your char- 
acter may be fashioned if you will. You may 
enter upon rich religious experience if you 
will. God is as near to you as he ever was to 
any saint. Keep burning before your eyes 
the vision of the kingdom of God, of what 
humanity on earth is yet to be. If war, in- 
justice, dishonesty and selfishness reign 
among men, it will be because we desire to 
have it so. The greatest sin in the world is 
not theft, murder or unpiety : it is to grow dull 
and unambitious, to fail to make the most 
of life. That is to crush the divine spark in 
us. Stir up the eternal in you. Open your 
eyes to the glory to which God destines you. 
And press on after it. To many of the 
ancients the Golden Age was in the past. 

To many Christians it has seemed in the 
future. Rather let us feel that it is in the 
present, here and now. No one ever had 
bestowed on him a greater blessing than is 
yours — that of being alive and young in the 
most crucial, interesting and hopeful period 
in human history". 



CLASS DAY 

At half past four sharp, Monday morning, 
June 7, the loyal Juniors hopped into suits 
from the year '07 and by breakfast had filled 
the Lasell wagon to the top with daisies for 
the Senior daisy chain. Not only the Juniors 
but Sophomores and other classes, too, spent 
the day helping the seniors in the prepara- 
tion for the big event of their year. It was 
not until seven thirty that evening that all 
doubts were settled that the class day exer- 
cises could be held out of doors. The many 
electric and arc lights made the campus so 
bright and cheery that the unsettled weather 
was forgotten. 

At eight o'clock, sharp, the seniors, led by 

Jessie Shepherd, president of their sister class, 

who carried their senior banner, appeared 

around Carter Hall, singing the processional, 

written by F. Lucile Jocelyn. 

Tune — Cornell Crew Song 
Onward with our hearts so loyal, 
To our Alma Mater true, 
We the class of one nine one five 
Come tonight our pledge to renew. 
For "Sequere Optima" 
Shall our motto ever be. 
Nobly let us strive to live 
To the world our best to give 
For the name of Alma Mater 
Ne'er to shirk! 

For the fame of Alma Mater 
To Work! Work! Work! 

Ever will we seek the highest 
In the name of old Lasell. 
Ever will her memory cherish 
On these happy days e'er dwell 
And "Sequere Optima" 
Shall ever guide us on. 
Onward! Let us strive to live 
So the world our best to give, 
Fifteen will the chorus ever 
Proudly swell, 

Of the fame, the praise, the honor 
Of Lasell. 

The Juniors took the chain from the Seniors 

and draped it around the platform, as the 

Seniors took their seats. The welcome speech 

was admirably given by Nellie Woodward, 

Class President. It was as follows; 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME 

A joyful greeting to you, one and all. 
Nineteen fifteen bids you the heartiest of 



276 



LASELL LEAVES 



welcomes to our Class Night gaieties. Class 
Night, dearest night of all the year; worked 
for, waited for, talked of as a wondrous event 
that we hardly dared think would ever take 
place so far away it seemed. 

Our welcome to you is not merely a matter 
of form; the first thing in due course on a 
Class Night program, — but it is the most 1 
genuine and the gladdest thing about it 
all; a sincere and personal assurance to you 
that it pleases us not a little to think that 
you care enough to come and share with us 
our happiness in these our festivities both 
of tonight and of the last few days that are 
the crowning glory of our Senior year. Glad 
indeed are we to see you. 

Dr. Winslow, you first of all, and Mrs. 
Winslow, we would welcome. It is our hope, 
our purpose to prove in the coming days our 
gratitude for the unfailing friendship that 
you have always shown us; and to prove our 
worthiness of the trust you have placed 
in us; a trust, the thought of which makes us 
proud and happy. 

To you, Miss Potter, and to all of you, our 
other friends of the Faculty, we extend our 
greeting and also our appreciation of your 
constant interest in us and your friendly 
help in the time of need. We shall endeavor 
in our turn to give to others the helping hand 
and the word of friendly counsel. 

Now we come to our parents and friends. 
How glad we are to welcome you, for with- 
out you our Class Night would have been 
far from joyous. Oh that some day we may 
do for some other girl what you have done for 
us — give her the opportunity and privilege 
of coming here to Lasell. Just how much this 
opportunity has meant to us, we cannot 
put into words tonight, but you shall see 
it in our endeavors to make good as the days 
and months go by. We will live our thanks 
instead of voicing them. It certainly is 
good to have you here. 

Thanks as well as welcome go to you girls 
here at school, for have you not given us the 



help of your friendship and of your loya 1 
support all the year? In everything we have 
undertaken you have stood close by, ready 
to back us up whenever we needed you. 
Girls, we are glad to know you as we do; in 
many respects you mean Lasell to us. Your 
being here helps us all the more to be happy 
tonight. 

This year has been especially successful 
and happy. How should it not have been? 
Was it not especially made to bring profit 
and pleasure to 1915? Here, doing our 
work in peace, favored with prosperity, 
lapped in comfort and plenty, we have run 
with success the last quarter of our long 
course, and have come out victorious! Yes, 
it has been a good year! 

The Class of Nineteen Fifteen is glad to 
bid you welcome! 

Then came the welcome song. It was as 
follows : 

SENIOR WELCOME SONG 

One Nine One Five welcomes you tonight, 

To see you gathered here again, adds much to our 

delight. 
Seniors of last year and those that are to be 
And both our sister classes — ' Fifteen now sings to thee: 

(1913 Song) 

Hail purple and gold! 

Hail sisters fair! 

Dear old Thirteen, your colors we'll e'er wear 

Now cheer for — 

(1914 Song) 

'Fourteen we now do sing to you 
To our Seniors we'll e'er be true 
All through last year you aided us 
In all we had to do. And 

(1916 Song) 

We have had the same good luck this year 
From the Junior class who are your sisters dear 
So let's give our hearty welcome cry, 
Hurrah for old 'Sixteen! 
So let's shout our hearty welcome cry 
Hurrah for old 'Sixteen! 

(1917 Song) 

All hail then, to our Sophomores! 

Grandest class in all Lasell! 

We will ne'er forget these favors 

And our gratitude we'll tell 

And so now again we thank you 

For all you have done this year 

Our love as of old, goes to purple and gold — ■ 

1917 that's you! 



LASELL LEAVES 



277 



(1915 Song) 

Lasell our very best give we to you 
And our sincerest tributes bring 
To you we come, in unison, 
Our Alma Mater dear, to sing 
The numerals Fifteen will ever stand 
Symbols of our trust as protector 
Of the name and worthy fame 
Of dear Lasell, our Mother. 

Bess Emerine next gave the roll call in 
which each member of the class was presented 
with a remembrance descriptive of some 
strong personal trait. To their president they 
gave at this time a travelling bag fitted out in 
ivory; to Kitten Carter a bunch of roses as 
tribute of their love and friendship to their 
little queen. A good deal of fun was caused 
when M. Bauman was unexpectedly called 
up to recite, and Katherine Hoag and Maude 
Freeman to sing Scottish melodies. Susan 
Tiffany was awarded the "big stick" of the 
class, not because of any resemblance what- 
ever to T. R. but because of her success in 
moulding school organizations. A catchy 
song followed which won much applause. 

SONG 

There're lots of things what ought to be but aint! 

Why, we're taught to think each alumna is a saint. 

But were you in the gym one night. 

When we nearly died in our delight? 

Why! there're lots of things what ought to be, but aint! 

There're lots of things we ought to know but don't! 
Those law lectures ought to soak us through: — -but 

won't. 
'Tis pretty bad when suddenly 
And an awful test is sprung on ye. 
Well! there're lots of things we'd like to say — but 

don't! 

There're lots of places where we'd like to go but can't! 

The movies are a place where we just "shan't" — 

Now what's the sense of all the fuss 

If they are good enough for us? 

Why there're lots of times we'd like to go — but can't! 

There're lots of things what ought to be — but ain't! 
Dr. Winslow makes remarks about some paint 
Now we wonder who's been having dreams 
Of painting the Deer House as it seems — 
There're lots of things that might be fun — but ain't! 

There're lots of things you'd like to know but don't! 

There're lots of things you're wild to know but won't! 

Where did the Seniors go one night 

When they'd their Spread by candle light 

There folks around who ought to know but don't! 

There're also things that shouldn't be but are 
For instance, your attention good — so far 



You've really been — oh very kind; 
Sometimes its awful hard to find 
An audience so respectful as you are. 

The following excellent poem, written by 
the class poet, Susan Tiffany, was then 
given. 

POEM 

Lasell, to Thee, Thy children come for blessing 

Ere from Thy face, into the world we go 
All sadness now within our hearts repressing, 

We bring our hopes to Thee 
To Thee, whose mother-care we would acknowledge 

Whose love has been to us a guiding star, 
To lead us on from doubts and indecisions 

To know the best, and seek it, near or far. 

Coming from far, to share each task and pleasure 

Children of North and South, of East and West 
Seeking together here, for wisdom's treasure 

Following her noble quest. 
Year after year we've climbed to higher levels 

Paying no heed to chance misstep or fall 
Till now we face the sun upon the hilltop 

In answer to Thy onward urging call. 

Full grave and weighty problems press us sore 

But we shall face them steadfast and serene. 
O Alma Mater, learning more and more 

In stress, on Truth's strong arm to lean. 
Some worthy deeds, we purpose to accomplish 

To make Thy name revered, a shining light 
Proving our loyalty and fond affection, 

Strengthening the bond, that doth our hearts unite. 

Fidelty, truth, honor, love and kindness 

The lessons you have taught us day by day 
Shall prove a light for us where else were blindness 

On our appointed way. 
So to our homes beloved, and to our country 

We'll faithful service do. as in us lies 
Aiming at womanhood noblest, finest 

With all the graciousness that it implies. 

Lasell, Thy latest daughters bear Thy honor 

Forth to Life's conflict as a trusted shield; 
Nineteen fifteen shall ever wear upon her 

Thy favor in the field. 
Rich treasure of glad memories we cherish 

And other Junes shall see us back return, 
Our friendships precious, thus, to rekindle 

Till like to sacred altar-fires they burn. 

Helen Benson then pleased the audience 
with this song, to the tune of "Goodbye, little 
Girl, Goodbye." The illustrated class prop- 
hecy, given by Maude Freeman and Doris 
Waller, in the costumes of 1940, kept the 
crowds in gayest of laughter. 

The Seniors followed the prophecy by sing- 
ing this song to their sister class, the Sopho- 
mores. 



278 



LASELL LEAVES 



SOPHOMORE SONG 

Dear school mates, our Senior year soon will be o'er 

Our life here a dream of the past, 

Yet, O Sophomores dear, with your memories sweet 

In our hearts you will stay to the last. 

'Twas you who came over one morning at six 

Oh, early you proved you were true! 

Tho' flowers fade away, long will memories stay 

If loyally pledged us by you. 

Chorus 
Little sisters, fond and true 
We'll remember you our whole life through; 
And when we all come back next year, 
You'll find that we still love you dear. 
Now the time to part has come; 
We pledge our love to you every one 
In our hearts there will rest 
The two things we love best — 
Our dear Alma Mater and you! 

The parties and dances you gave us this year. 

Your May decorations also 

We remember with joy, and they cheered the full dull 

hours 
When we dwelt with Toil, Labor — and so 
Your purple and gold are the Senior's delight 
We've admired them all the year through; 
And ever it seems that we see in our dreams 
Those colors that symbolize you. 

Chorus 
Little sisters, fond and true, etc. 

Then Maude Wetherbee cleverly pre- 
sented to the school the mementoes of '15. 
These included slams on "bed mixing," 
"crushes," "unsought-for opinions and ad- 
vice," "alertness" and a general "bawling 
out" of the Junior class. 

SONG TO THE JUNIORS 

Dear folks, behold our Junior friends, 
The wisest class of all! 
Why they know all there is to know — ■ 
At least they will always tell you so. 
Why — they knew all if this year's stunts 
Before they came last fall — ■ 
And so we show them off to-night 
This wisest class of all! 

Our Caps and Gowns we took one day 

You hadn't one word to say — 

Altho some song that you had planned 

You used later on as second hand 

You let us take our tables, too, 

And afterwards said — "we knew!" 

Well — you ought to be ashamed if you really knew 

To be so awful slow! 

In spite of all your wisdom — 

We fooled you just the same. 

You're pretty good at guessing, 

But guessing's not the game. 

Our caps and gowns we took with ease 

These pins — our tables, too — 

In fact— we've done just what we pleased 

With hindrance none from you. 



Now here's a bit of good advice — 
Advice is what you need! 
If you are all so very bright — 
And want folks to think you're wise 
You mustn't sing your praises, 
Nor blow your own tin horn — 
Let everybody see for themselves 
What a marvelous bunch you are. 

This most interesting selection was closed 
by a soothing song showing that though class 
spirit was high, affection between the rival 
classes was not lacking. 

Let us tell you Juniors dear, 

That we have appreciated you this year 

In our hearts a place you've won, 

Let us tell you that we love you — Everyone. 

The presentation of the class gifts was made 
by Florence Evans who closed the program 
with a very impressive farewell to their Alma 
Mater. She said : 

"Class Night has come again! You have 
listened to our fates and have seen our 
futures vividly portrayed ; it is now for me to 
bid you all good-bye. We have looked 
forward to the end of the year with sadness, 
I admit; now let us look awhile on the op- 
timistic side. Had our parents not been 
able and willing to give us the privilege of 
being Lasell girls, we should not have our 
treasure of happy memories, that we now 
hold so dear. Our good-bye does not signify 
an ending. It is but the beginning of some- 
thing new. To-morrow brings change for 
us all; and we of 1915 must now begin to 
show in the best way possible to us our 
appreciation of the firm, loyal and steadfast 
friends made here at Lasell. Likewise we 
must strive each in her own individual way, 
to be happier, nobler women. 
^ To the school we Seniors desire to leave a 
gift which shall mean much to every coming 
Lasell Senior. In Gardner, circled around 
the Sunday night fire, we have felt veritably 
like one family. This feeling we have so 
enjoyed and so value that we want it to 
mean as much to those who are to come after 
us. Hence we leave andirons and other 



LASELL LEAVES 



279 



furnishings for our fireplace, also a wicker 
lounge for the house on the hill. 

It is a custom to say, "Good-bye," on 
Class Night; but the word suggests separa- 
tion, and we of 1915 can never lose out of our 
lives, never be really absent again from those 
who will remain here after we are gone. 
You Dr. Winslow and you, Miss Potter, 
faithful friends and advisers that you have 
been, we shall see as often as we are able, 
and always with gladness. It is but half a 
good-bye we are bidding you now. And you 
others of our faculty, too, we are not forget- 
ful who we owe to your willing endeavor to 
help us and make our stay here a pleasant 
one. With you also we shall exchange glad 
greetings in the coming days, with many an 
exclamation of pleasure at the re-union. 

Sophomore Sisters; you have been loyal 
to the uppermost, nor could we have asked 
for stronger or more unswerving support. 
From time to time we have already tried to 
show you our appreciation of this; now once 
more we wish to express to you our sincerest 
gratitude. 

For you, girls, the Seniors of to-morrow, 
we wish a Senior year as happy as ours has 
been. The friendliness of our two classes 
has been delightful, the spirit existing all 
that could be wished and we thank you for 
this, and for all you have done for us. 

Classmates: hitherto we have always stood 
together, in heart and purpose, and we 
always shall. We need not say good-bye, 
since it is distance alone that separates us, 
and thanks to modern ingenuity, that dis- 
tance is nowadays never far. 

With this in mind shall we not light- 
heartedly forget that we are leaving Old 
Lasell tomorrow and remember only how 
incomparably rich we are in friendships, 
life's truest gold. Instead then of good- 
bye, the class of 1915 bids you one and all 
good-night. 

To the tune of this "Recessional," the 
Seniors marched up through the archway 
in front of Cushman where they joined the 



band and Sophomore president, bearing the 
Senior banner and loving cup. 
RECESSIONAL 

With voices in gladness ringing. 
With hearts full of loyalty, 
We, Lasell, vow e'er to keep 
Thy ideals faithfully. 
In future years remembering 
The joyous days of the Past, 
We'll honor the name of Lasell 
As long as life shall last. 
Fifteen! Fifteen! Fifteen! 
Fifteen! Fifteen! Fifteen! 
Fifteen! Fifteen! Fifteen! 
With voices in gladness ringing. 
With hearts full of loyalty, 
We. Lasell, vow e'er to keep 
Thy ideals faithfully. 
In future years remembering 
The joyous days of the Past, 
We'll honor the name of Lasell 
As long as life shall last. 

The Senior torch bearers, chosen from 
the Junior class, came up through the 
gateway and joined their Seniors there. 
The procession marched once around the 
campus and then stopped in front of 
Cushman forming a semi-circle, with 
the torch bearers standing just behind the 
Seniors. Veda Ferguson gave a splendid fare- 
well and then the class joined in the following 

song. 

FAREWELL TO CUSHMAN 

Old Main, to you 

We come farewell to say. 

We'll not forget days gone for aye. 

Each room our hearts doth fill 

With memories dear. 

Oh, we'll remember you each future year. 

Chorus 
Farewell, dear Cushman; 
Farewell to you. 
We pledge devotion 
And love so true. 
To you, Nineteen Fifteen 
Bids fond farewell to Cushman Hall. 

The march was then continued to Gardner 

where Martha Schumann, standing beneath 

the large 1915 electrical sign, bade farewell to 

the Senior Home. This song which is certainly 

appropriate for that farewell was sung by the 

class. 

SONG TO GARDNER 

Oh Gardner, our home, thou hast sheltered us well 
Dear house on the hill top where as class mates we 

dwell 
Good times by thy fireside with music and fun. 
Entertaining o'er week ends and all else we've done 
These have been our chief joys since our school years 
begun. 




PROCESSION AROUND THE CAMPUS 




TO THE FLAMES 



LASELL LEAVES 



281 



Though the next year may find us far away from Lasell 
Our thoughts will be turning to this home loved so well. 
Sweet memories we'll cherish of happy hours here 
Our hearts knit in friendship to classmates so dear 
Full of brightness you've been, full of love and good 
cheer. 

Jessie Shepherd then lead the line along the 

lower path to the Crows Nest where Evelyn 

Dunham gave the farewell to the much-loved 

nest in the tree. 

CLASS NIGHT CROW'S NEST 

At Lasell on a hill, there is the loveliest spot 

So dear to every Senior Class; 

'Tis the dearest gift that falls to their lot 

And treasured is by every lass. 

Let's sing again to our dear Crows Nest 

For fondly we love it still 

All the year this retreat has the senior girls blest 

But good bye now, dear Crows Nest on the hill. 

The program closed with the scene around 
"The Flames" into which each Senior cast an 
emblem of the thing most detested during her 
school life from, the wall paper, to Senior 
responsibilities. 

The Seniors then locked arms, sang, and 
drank to one another's health from the loving 
cup which Jessie Shepherd presented to 
them. 

LOVING CUP SONG 

Here's to you 

Here's to our jovial friend 
And now in this company we drink before we 

part 
Here's to you 

The Class Exercises were then closed with 
the singing of a good night song and of the 
Alma Mater. 

Mrs. Martin wishes us to say here that the 
1915 girls were the most harmonious with her, 
and the most responsive to their president of 
any class she ever drilled. They have had no 
dissenting word nor disagreement during their 
whole preparation for Commencement. 



THE LAST CHAPEL 

On Tuesday morning, June 8, the students, 
the alumnae, the faculty and the guests 
assembled in the chapel for the last service 
of the year. At its close, Dr. Winslow an- 
nounced the winners of the many Lasell 
contests and gave out diplomas and certifi- 
cates of the different courses. 

To the surprise of the girls, the results of 



the Law test were read first. The girls were 
especially delighted at the high marks re- 
ceived by their Senior schoolmates which 
ranged from 90 to 100 plus (the plus being 
given because of the good form used, thanks 
to Miss Witherbee!) Diplomas in music too 
were given Frances Johnsen, Piano and Marion 
Newland, Voice. The receivers of certificates 
in music: Helen Benson and Adolphia Garn- 
sey, Piano; Katherine Hoag and Marie 
Klenze, Voice. The long list of those who 
were entitled to certificates in Home Econom- 
ics was read next. They were as follows: 

Elizabeth Beach, Ida Beane, Katherine 
Bingaman, Elsie Doleman, Florence Evans, 
Veda Ferguson, Frances Harris, Elizabeth 
Hildreth, Lucile Joscelyn, Marie Klenze, 
Clara Paton, Vilette Peck, Evalina Perkins, 
Helen Pope, Margaret Powell, Doris Waller, 
Maude Wetherbee, Gladys Wilkes, Nellie 
Woodward. 

To Evelyn Dunham was given a certificate 
in Drawing and Painting; to Edna Beaver, 
Marion Newland, Mildred Ordway, Mabel 
Straker, Lillian Griffin, Vera Willis, certificates 
in Book-keeping. 

There were numerous awards for athletic 
contests, A silver cup was given to Carol 
Rice, captain of the winning crew, to be held 
until next year. Of the winning crew Carol 
Rice and Maude Hayden were each entitled 
to a bar on their sweaters won in 1914; Grace 
Farley, Mabel Straker, Marion Newland, 
Marie Saxton, Adolphia Garnsey, Lavinia 
Fera, Marian Griffin won "L" sweaters. 

Dorothy Crane and Jessie Shepherd were 
awarded silver cups for having won in the 
single canoe race. 

Field Day letters were awarded as follows: 
Florence Evans "TT" to wear on sweater 
won 1914. 

Bess Emerine, sweater with T. T. ; Marion 
Griffin, sweater with T. T. ; Marie Kolb, 
sweater with T. T. ; Carol Rice, entitled to 
three bars for sweater won in 1914. 

Those entitled to letters for Basket Ball 



were: 



282 



LASELL LEAVES 



Carol Rice, Florence Evans, entitled to bar. 

Dorothy Mathias, Mabel Straker, Mildred 
Cloake, Orissa Attwill, Marie Kolb, Helen 
Gerret, Kathrine Allen win "B. B." 

Silver cups for swimming contests were 
given to the following: 

Cornelia Gaty, cup winner in diving event. 

Marie Kolb, cup winner in event for speed. 

Helen Hardwick, cup winner in plunge for 
distance. 

Miss Packard then read the names of the 
girls who had gained extra credits for recom- 
mendations in studies. 

Martha Schumann, average 94 1-18%, 3 credits. 
Adolphia Garnsey, average 93%, 2 credits. 
Lucile Joscelyn, average 92.9%, 2 credits. 
Carol Rice, average 93 1-8%, 2 credits. 
Lenette Rogers, average 93 1-10%, 3 credits. 
Gladys Wilkes, average 93 3-4%, 2 credits. 
Katherine Prentiss, average 93 1-5%, 2 cred- 
its. Doris Lord, average 95%, 2 credits. 

Great excitement reigned when Dr. Win- 
slow held up the tiny gold and silver loaves, 
first and second prizes in the bread making 
contest. The first prize was won by Eliza- 
beth Hildreth and the second by Elsie Dole- 
man. Honorable mention was given to Veda 
Ferguson and Gertrude Korn. 

Two new prizes, in the form of a silver cup 
and a seal, were awarded to members of the 
Senior Class for faithful and successful attain- 
ment in scholarship. All were pleased to have 
them go to Lucile Joscelyn and Gladys Wilkes. 
Doris Waller received honorable mention. 

Four post-graduate students had seals 
placed upon their certificates: Elsie Doleman, 
who holds the highest number of credits, 
Marie Klenze, Mildred Westervelt and Clara 
MacDonald. 

Two members of the Student Council were 
given pins for they had served on that organi- 
zation for two years. These were Nellie 
Woodward and Marion Beach. 

The silver cup for the Tennis Championship 
has not been awarded as the finals have not 
yet been completed. At present the place 
lies between Elizabeth Richards and Elsie 
Doleman. 

The singing of the Alma Mater completed 
these interesting announcements. 



COMMENCEMENT DAY 

On Tuesday morning, June 8, the school 
procession led by Dr. and Mrs. Winslow and 
the faculty, took their places in the Congre- 
gational Church, the use of which had again 
courteously been granted for the graduating 
exercises. The altar had been decorated with 
hanging baskets of orange colored calendulas, 
fever-few and ferns, so as to give an artistic 
effect and to carry out the 1915 colors. The 
church was crowded to the doors with friends 
and alumnae who were present in unusually 
large numbers. 

During the exercises the audience was ex- 
ceptionally favored in hearing the remarkable 
violinist, Miss Seydel, play the Berceuse of 
Strube, and the Meditation from Massenet's 
Thais. It is only on rare occasions that an 
artist of such excellence can be heard. 

Mr. Ferguson's singing of Schubert's Om- 
nipotence was also greatly admired. They 
were both ably accompanied by Mr. George 
Dunham. 

Prayer was offered by the Revered Dr. 
McCollistar, Dean of Tufts Divinity School, 
and the address of the morning was given 
by the Dr. Charles R. Brown, Dean of 
the Yale School of Religion. He said, in 
part: 

"Let me bring you a motto on this Com- 
mencement Day. It is the motto of the old- 
est college for women in America. It is 
from the song of an ancient singer who wished 
that the daughters of his country might be 
as 'corner-stones polished after the similitude 
of a palace.' 

"You have here the three main elements in 
the finer type of womanhood: character, cul- 
ture, sympathy. Let the young women be in 
character as solid and reliable as a corner- 
stone; you always know where to find her. 
She is not blown about by every breeze of 
outside influence. She lives by settled 
principles. 

"Let her be smooth and fair, gracious and 
charming, polished after the similitude of a 
palace! The polish of the granite block is 
not something laid on from the outside — it is 
the essential quality of the granite revealing 
itself in all its beauty. The culture of the 



LASELL LEAVES 



283 



true woman is the woman's own inner self 
finding expression in those ways which add 
to the beauty and glory of her life. 

"Let her in the spirit of sympathy be 
ready to take her place in society as the stone 
takes its place in the wall of the palace. She 
is ready to subordinate personal preferences 
and her own selfish convenience that the 
social structure may thereby be reared in all 
its noble usefulness. Character, culture, 
sympathy, these three! If these qualities be 
in you and abound you will without fail make 
your due contribution to the world's precious 
store of worthy and gracious womanhood." 

After the address Dr. Winslow presented 
to the graduating class their diplomas, while 
Miss Potter read the names of the members. 
Dr. Winslow in a brief address commended 
the class for their loyalty to the ideals of the 
school, assured them of the interest felt in 
them and laid upon them the charge so nobly 
expressed in the words: The Seminary sends 
you forth to represent her. You bear her 
name: you must protect her honor. 

The names of the thirty-six graduates are: 

Irene Rose Apfelbaum, Fort Wayne, In- 
diana; Irene Clark Ball, Massena, New York; 
Margrethe Marion Bauman, Grayling, 
Michigan; Elizabeth Sherwood Beach, 
Binghamton, New York; Ida Leona Beane, 
Auburndale, Massachusetts; Helen Lucile 
Benson, Tower, Minnesota; Katherine 
Grant Bingaman, Plainfield, New Jersey; 
Isabel Elizabeth Bradley, Bolivar, New 
York; Myrtle Alvina Brix, Portland, 
Oregon; Catherine Garland Carter, Lynch- 
burg, Virginia; Marion Cutting, Fort Wayne, 
Indiana; Evelyn Hawley Dunham, Brattle- 
boro, Vermont; Bess Evalyn Emerine, 
Fostoria, Ohio; Florence Miller Evans, 
Cincinnati, Ohio; Veda Ferguson, Bozeman, 
Montana; Maude Loftus Freeman, Chelsea, 
Massachusetts; Elizabeth Fales Hildreth, 
Brattleboro, Vermont; Katherine Adelaide 
Hoag, Ogden, Utah; Frances Louise John- 
sen, Providence, Rhode Island; Florence 
Lucile Joscelyn, Newport, Vermont; Mar- 



garet Virginia King, Warren, Ohio; Ida 
Roads Laubenstein, Ashland, Pennsylvania; 
Ruth Amanda MacGregor, Rumford, Maine; 
Bernice Louise Marx, Cincinnati, Ohio; 
Ethel Elizabeth Murray, San Saba, Texas; 
Clara Lake Pa ton, Leominster, Mass- 
achusetts; Ada Frances Patterson, Ashland, 
Ohio; Vilette Marion Peck, Norwich, Conn- 
ecticut; Evelina Eliza Perkins, West 
Newton, Massachusetts; Martha Caroline 
Schumann, Hartford, Connecticut; Katherine 
Thorp, West Roxbury, Massachusetts; 
Susan Emeline Tiffany, Blandford, Mass- 
achusetts; Doris Rogers Waller, Toronto, 
Ontario; Maude Thompson Wetherbee, 
Lyndonville, Vermont; Gladys Wilkes, Dallas, 
Texas, Nellie Elizabeth Woodward, 
Brookline, Massachusetts. 



FAREWELL TO THE CROWS NEST 

At 12.30 after the Commencement Ex- 
ercises the Seniors marched in single file to 
take their last stand in the Crows Nest on 
which their banner was hung. They first 
sang a farewell song which was composed 
by Nell Woodward and then their class song. 

COMMENCEMENT CROWS NEST SONG 

Time has come, girls, to give over 
Our retreat 'neath shadows sweeping, 
Now our Crows Nest to the Seniors 
Of Sixteen we give its keeping. 
Guard it well, e'er keep bright, 
The honor of its name, 
For it is the dearest spot, girls, 
You may call your ain. 

Take a vow, girls, to be loyal 
To this Crows Nest ever dear. 
Here, as to a throne room royal 
We'll come back in a future year. 
Ever be, oh dear Sixteen 
To old traditions true 
Then we'll gladly give today 
Our dear Crows Nest to you. 

CLASS SONG 

Lasell our very best give _ we to you, 
And our sincerest tribute bring. 
To thee we come, in unison. 
Our Alma Mater dear, to sing. 
The numerals 15 will ever stand 
Symbols of our truest as protectors; 
Of the name and worthy fame 
Of dear Lasell, our Mother. 



284 



LASELL LEAVES 



Upon coming down out of the Crows Nest 
after removing their banner, the class of 
1915 formed in a double line at the foot of 
the step taking off their caps placed them 
over their hearts. The Juniors then, led by 
Anna Cornwall, vice-president, and Rose 
Baer, treasurer, marched up between the 
Senior's line and placed on the side of the 
Nest the 1916 banner, of King's blue and gold. 
The first song was a traditional one: 

Now once again the Juniors meet, 

To take their old tradition seat 

We take today what is our due 

What 1914 gave to you. 

This Crows Nest where we take our stand, 

We'll hold as Seniors grave and grand 

Hail to the shades of Seniors gone before, 

Hail to 1915, Seniors no more. 

We thank you for this cool retreat, 

From class room toil and noonday heat 

We'll hold tradition old and dear 

In days of toil and hours of cheer. 

And in this place where oft you've stood, 

We'll think of you in loving mood, 

Hail to the shades of Seniors gone before 

Hail to 1915. Seniors no more. 

The second was an original song and melody 
by Mildred Cloake. 

Now au revoir 1-9-1-5, 

Au revoir but not goodbye, 

Soon each of you must face the world 

For parting time grows nigh. 

So good luck, health, wealth and prosperity, 

Ever attend your way, 

May your future life be gay. 

The officers of the two classes then joined 
hands at the foot of the steps and all sang the 
Alma Mater. 

The class of 1915 wished us to say here that 
they were greatly pleased to have so many of 
the Alumnae and old girls at the closing ex- 
ercises, as their presence lessened the hour. 
To the entire school also their coming has 
been a help. 



CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR NOTES 

Florence Hauslein led Christian Endeavor 
on May the eleventh, taking as her topic, 
"Examples and Influences." Anna Cornwall 
sang "Abide With Me." 

On May the eighteenth, Dr. Winslow 



talked to us about the present war, reminding 
us that there are certain things we can do to 
help bring about peace. 

The prayer meeting on May the twenty- 
fifth was led by Mr. Frank F. Davidson, 
President of the Dover Street Rescue Mis- 
sion, Boston. He gave a very earnest and 
helpful talk on the past, the present, and the 
future of the Christian Church. 

Barbara Ann Jones, '14, former president 
of the C. E. Society led the meeting on June 
the first. She read from the book "The Man 
in Lonely Land," the story of "The Man Who 
Did Not Know" that all the people in the 
world belonged to him until a little child led 
him along the many roads where there was 
suffering. He learned to relieve these suf- 
ferers wherever he found them, and never 
desired again to travel over the road that 
leadeth nowhere. 



COMMENCEMENT VESPERS 

The chapel was filled to overflowing, 
Sunday night, June 6, when Henry Turner 
Bailey led the Commencement Vespers. The 
processional was again "Ancient of Days." 
Helen Benson accompanied by Doris Lord, 
at the piano and Ruth Harris and Sara Ham- 
mond with violins, sang the beautiful song, 
"O Holy Father," with her usual strength and 
feeling. 




SCENE FROM THE PLYMOUTH TRIP 




D1T0RIA 




When this, the June number of the Leaves, 
reaches you, members of the Class of 1915, 
your Commencement Exercises will be over 
and you will probably be at home enjoying 
your well-earned rest. It is not enough for 
us to say that we are very sorry to see you 
go, for you have held a high place in the 
hearts of all. During this whole year, you 
have set for us a splendid standard and we 
have attempted to follow it. You have 
gained an honorable name here at dear 
Lasell; we are all sure that "The numerals 
'15 shall ever stand" as marking a class with 
splendid life and spirit. We feel confident 
that you will all make names for yourselves 
in other fields also and carry out some of the 
many helpful suggestions which have been 
given during this year. Continue to live up 
to your worthy motto, "Sequere optima," 
during the years to come as you have lived 
up to it during your school life. 

Remember, girls, that what you are doing 
will always be of great interest to all here at 
school. We hope that you will ever have 
enough interest in the school, for which you 
have done so much, to desire to keep in 
touch with her. 

The girls of Lasell wish the Class of 1915 
all the joy and happiness possible, and hope 
to see or hear from every member next year. 
Best of luck! Au revoir! 



loved Gardner, to thank the Class of 1915 
for their splendid gifts to that house. The 
fire set will mean much to the girls during 
the winter term, when they gather in groups 
around the fire-place. Such occasions will 
recall to many of us the pleasant evenings 
which the Class of 1915 has given with their 
song parties. The handsome couch also is a 
most acceptable gift, adding much to the 
comfort and attractiveness of the hall. 

This thoughtfulness is just a sample of the 
generosity of the Senior Class. 



The Editor wishes in behalf of all the 
coming classes which will soon in our much 



The following lines were written by our 
art editor to interpret the meaning of the 
design shown on the cover of this number 
of The Leaves. 

THE TWO PATHS 

Two paths in the Road of Life there be. 

Two paths — both lead to the mighty sea. 

The one with rough sharp stones is strewn, 

The other with blossoming flowers o'ergrown; 

The one leads safe to the harbor shore, 

The other is lost forevermore. 

What are the names of these paths, you say? 

Why, the Path of Work and the Path of Play. 

Listen, O Seniors, my counsel wise: 

Play is a vision for childhood's eyes; 

Choose ye the Path of Work for your own. 

Now ye are women and older grown. 

Beware, lest you make a calamitous choice, 

And weakly yield to the tempter's voice. 

For, tho' Pleasure to-day seems to charm and to 

bless, 
Her goal is the House of Unhappiness; 
But Work, tho' she fills with stern struggle the 

hour. 
Leads surely at length, where the guerdon is won. 
The purpose achieved and the tasks all done. 
To the harbor at last, to the Port of Power. 

Edith F. Hodges. 




Lasell girls wedding bells began ringing in 
May, ushering in beautiful "Commencement 
Days" for girls other than our seniors. 

Dorothy Bevans' wedding was a military 
one, for this Lasell girl, the daughter of a 
Lasell girl (Desdemona Millikin, '92, is also 
the daughter of Major James L. Bevans, and 
her husband, Captain Floyd Kramer, is of 
the Medical Corps United States Army. 
The marriage occurred May 25 at Fisher's 
Island, N. Y., where Dr. Bevans has been 
recently appointed. 

On Tuesday, June 8, occurred the marriage 
of Rosalie Seinsheimer, '12 to Mr. Nervin J. 
Heldman, at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

On Wednesday, June 9, occurred the marri- 
age of Marguerite Haley, '11, to Mr. William 
John Weir at Sioux City, la, Mr. and Mrs. 
Weir will be at home after August first at 
Sioux City. 

Edna Nichols became Mrs. John Upton 
Crosby on Saturday, June 12, at Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

On Wednesday, June 16, Cora Mildred 
Hasty was united in marriage to Mr. Clinton 
Ray Thompson at Auburn, Maine. 

We have also received invitations to the 
wedding of Josephine Siggins to Dr. Henry 
Edwin Utter, brother of our Mary Starr, '12, 
to take place on Wednesday, June 23, at 



West Hickory, Pa. A number of our Com- 
mencement visitors were expecting to attend 
the wedding of this popular "old girl." 

Our congratulations to these Lasell brides. 

We have recently received the announce- 
ment of the engagement of Mary Wilcox 
to Mr. Emile Landru. Mary used to talk of 
specializing in Home Economics but we had 
no hint of her carrying out her plans in just 
this way. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Smith have an- 
nounced the engagement of their daughter, 
Eleanor Elizabeth, to Mr. Allan Irving Dean, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Dean of Daniel- 
son, Conn. Mr. Dean is a civil engineer for the 
Massachusetts Highway Commission and a 
member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity of 
Syracuse University. 

Our best wishes to these young friends. 

During these Commencement days the one 
most missed of all was our Principal Emeritus 
Dr. Charles Cushman Bragdon. He did not 
forget us and sent a loving message through 
Dr. Winslow. 

In a note received from Frances Allen, she 
writes "I am just leaving for California 
where I shall spend the greater part of the 
summer" and expresses a hope of meeting the 
Lasell California party. 



LASELL LEAVES 



287 



Cecelia Smith, who is spending the summer 
at Coronado, California, also hopes that she 
will have the opportunity of entertaining our 
preceptress and the Lasell friends at her home. 
The same wish was expressed by the hospitable 
Chicago Lasell Club. These courteous over- 
tures are greatly appreciated by the travellers. 

Lasell is greatly indebted to Lela Goodall, 
'08 and Josephine Woodward, '10 for their 
enthusiastic and successful "stirring up" of 
the "old girls" to return this Commencement. 
We do not recall so large a reunion of "old 
girls" at Commencement time than occurred 
this year. And how they rejoiced in the 
prosperity of our school, which they confessed 
was a surprise to them "during these war 
times!" 

One of our most welcome guests was Callie 
Le Seure, '03 who came early and stayed late, 
to our great delight, thus giving herself an 
opportunity to really know the workings of 
the school, and her words of approval and 
praise we greatly appreciate. 

We would like to mention in turn each dear 
one of the loyal girls who "came home"and 
who seemed to feel so happily "at home." 

Commencement seemed incomplete with- 
out the gracious presence of our Miss Blaisdell 
but it was a comfort to feel that she was on 
the ground and as keenly interested as ever. 
Although dear Miss Nutt was resting at her 
sister's home in Newton, a number of her 
girls found her out and had pleasant visits 
with her, and many more sent their greeting 
in the form of beautiful flowers. 

One of the most unique and charming 
features of this Commencement was the 
stunts of the different classes in the dining 
room on Commencement Day. Who can 
ever forget the attractive appearance of the 
class of 1910 as they came down the stairs, 
wearing their class colors in the form of pretty 
capes and bearing baskets filled with bou- 
tonnieres and bon bons with which they 
generously showered the guests, also the 
original songs and class colored costumes of the 
classes of 1903, 1911, 1912, 1913 and 1914. 
Each class in turn wore armlets of Lasell 
blue decorated with the class numeral. 



With unusual pleasure we give below the 
roll of honored guests at Lasell during the 
Commencement days. We would like to 
write many pleasant things about each of 
these girls but space forbids. We thank them 
for coming and hope they will come again 
another year. 

Mrs. Fanny Gray Merrick, '56, Mrs. 
Mary Shaw Rogers, '56, Mrs. Flora Drew 
Sampson, '57, Mrs. Emma Sears May, '57, 
Mrs. Fannie Sykes Davis, '57, Mrs. Caroline 
Hills Leeds, '61, Angeline C. Blaisdell, '67, 
Mrs. Ella Richardson Cushing, '73, Lillie R. 
Potter, '80, Lillian M. Packard, '83, Mrs. Nel- 
lie Packard Draper, '84, Mrs. Marietta Rose 
Green, '86, Mrs. Etta Stafford Vaughan, '86, 
Mary Lulie Hogg, '88, Mary Witherbee, '92, 
Mrs. Jennie Arnold Felt, '93, Nellie Richards 
'93, Mrs. Lotta Proctor Chapman, '94, 
Harriet Scott, '94, Mrs. Josephine Chandler 
Pierce, '96, Mrs. Alice Jenckes Wilson, '99, 
Mrs. Ethel Johnson Viles, '99, Mrs. Gertrude 
Watson Linscott, '99, Mrs. Alice Ashley 
Patten, '00, Mrs. Mary Upham Clark, '02, 
Callie Le Seure, '03, Mabelle Whitney, '03, 
Mrs. Barbara Vail Bosworth, '05, Mrs. Alice 
Leslie White Ailing, '05, Mrs. Mildred Peirce 
Fuller, '06, Mrs. Maude Simes Harding, '06, 
Mrs. Dorothea Turner Moulton, '06, Agnes 
Bullard, '08, Charlotte Ryder, '08, Mrs. 
Stella Marx Rosenberg, '09, Maria Riker, 
'09, Olive Bates, '10, Amy Brannan, '10, 
Julia Crafts, '10, Mildred Goodall, '10, Mrs. 
Martha Hazelet Crooks, '10, Mary Lum- 
bard, '10, Mary Cornelia Stone, '10, Susan 
Stryker, '10, Mrs. Vera Bradley Findlay, '11, 
Mrs. Barbara Dennen Carpenter, '11, Nina 
Dietz, '11, Mrs. Grace Harvey Hall, '11, 
Margaret Jones, '11, Edna Kauffman, '11, 
Kathleen Knight, '11, Gladys Lawton, '11, 
Doris Powers, '11, Helen Sayre, '11, Helen 
Thirkield, '11, Dorothea Africa, '12, Grace 
Alexander, '12 Ruth Bachelder, '12, Mrs. Ruth 
Coulter Bierer, '12, Miriam Flynn, '12, 
Mildred Hall, '12, Orra Hammond, '12, 
Florence Jones, '12, Marion Joslin, '12, Annie 
Merrill, '12, Ethel Moore, '12, Clara Parker, 
'12, Elinor Ryan, '12, Clara Trowbridge, '12, 
Mary Starr Utter, '12, Rosalthe Williams, '12, 



288 



LASELL LEAVES 



Juliette Beach, '13, Mary Cummings, '13, 
Mary Fenno,'13, Dorothy Fink,' 13, Charlotte 
Joseph, '13, Elizabeth Linn, '13, Margaret 
Livermore, '13, Ada Swanger, '13, Hannah 
Bingaman, '14, Lois Brader, '14, Alleda 
Burnett, '14, Mildred Cutting, '14, Ruth 
Davis, '14, Gratia deZouche, '14, Elsie Dole- 
man, '14, Myra Eby, '14, Angeline Emery, 
'14, Mabel Flagler, '14, Marcia Fogg, '14, 
Dora Goodwillie, '14, Dorothy Hartshorn, 
'14, Mildred Hotchkiss, '14, Barbara Jones, 
'14, Mabel Jones, '14, Lena Vee Kelley, '14, 
Marie Klenze, '14, Carolyn Moore, '14, Ruby 
Newcomb, '14, Evelyn Schmidt, '14, Florence 
Shields, '14, Mildred Smith, '14, Helen 
Soule, '14, Charlotte Swartwout, '14, Abbie 
Viener, '14, Eunice Votaw, '14, Esther Alden, 
Elizabeth Bailey, Mrs. Anna Andrews Barris, 
Mrs. Edith Waller Bermond, Mrs. Louise 
Gurley Betts, Elizabeth Carter, Mary Curtiss, 
Mrs. Nellie Briggs Chandler, Judith Dollings, 
Mildred Goddard, Ruth Hall, Phoebe Hallock, 
Josephine Harris, Mrs. Mildred Marshall 
Hayden, Mrs. Alice Mayo Hicks, Madeline 
Higgins, Mrs. Blanche Bussell Hoffman, 
Martha Keith, Gertrude Knickerbocker, Sara 
Lane, Mrs. Lillian Upton Lawton, Louise 
Lucas, Hazel MacGregor, Adelaide Miller, 
Mrs. Emma Wall Pinkham, Mrs. Frances 
Gray Porter, Polly Porter, Mrs. Alice Tay- 
lor Potter, Clara Robinson, Mrs. Ellen Stone 
Robinson, Florence Rogers, Mrs. Etta Mac- 
Millan Rowe, Sara Shuttleworth, Mrs. Mary 
Wells Smith, Dorothy Smith, Eleanor Smith, 
Hilda Smith, Reta Spiro, Cora Stone, Ruth 
Talcott, Jean Walker, Alice Wardman, Mrs. 
Edith Burke Wells, Sophie Wendt, Violet 
Irene Wellington, Eunice Williams, Avalon 
Wilson, Marguerite York, Natalie York. 



MEETING OF THE ALUMNAE 

The last, but by no means the least im- 
portant event of Commencement Day was 
the annual meeting of the Lasell Alumnae As- 
sociation which was called to order by the 
president, Miss Lillian Packard, in the 
Seminary Chapel at three o'clock. 

After the president's cordial greeting to one 



and all, the class of 1915 were welcomed as 
members of the Association by a rising vote 
gracefully acknowledged by Miss Woodward, 
president of the graduating class. 

Reports were read by the Secretary and the 
Treasurer, the latter showing a total deposit 
of $1,040.46 up to date, which is very en- 
couraging in view of the larger financial 
helpfulness toward which the Association 
aims. 

From the Caroline Carpenter Memorial 
Fund $55.62 was this year enjoyed by a very 
worthy beneficiary, and the chairman of the 
Alumnae Fund reported a request for a $100 
loan to be used during the coming year as 
previously arranged. 

The returns from, the mid-winter Reunion 
were used for a small but needful scholarship 
in Home Economics and as it is a great satis- 
faction for Lasell to be able to respond to the 
many appeals for help in various branches, 
the class of 1857 was heartily applauded for 
its generosity in granting for a second year, 
scholarships in organ and stenography. 

This is also the year when the Charlotte 
Bancroft Scholarship becomes available for 
the first time, and the motion carried that 
$100 should be taken from the Treasury as a 
gift from, the Alumnae to be used for a 
scholarship in any department deemed wise 
by the dispensing committee of which the 
President shall be chairman. 

Miss Lela Goodall, for the "Enthusiasm 
Committee" reported gratifying response 
from, many classes who made bright spots in 
the dining-room, and in the chapel by the 
distinctive coloring and arrangement of the 
class costume, and it was voted that the 
committee continue the good work another 
year with Miss Goodall as chairman, Jose- 
phine Woodward to serve with her, other 
assistants to be selected by the chairman. 

From classes graduated before 1860, five 
were present, and three members from the 
class of 1861. Eleven of the 1911 girls returned 
seventeen of 1912's graduates, and twenty- 
seven of the class of 1914. 

There were about twenty-five at the meet- 



LASELL LEAVES 



289 



ing from 1860-1900, and more from all 
classes were probably present during tfie day, 
but to be counted as "really-truly return en- 
thusiasts" one must be in evidence at the 
Alumnae Meeting! 

Everyone was inquiring for our dear Miss 
Nutt and many were the expressions of sym- 
pathy and regret that illness prevented her 
from attending the Commencement activities. 

The Association sent loving greetings to 
Miss Blaisdell who was very much missed 
as this was her forty-second Commencement 
and the first one she has failed to attend. 

Miss Ruth Crandall sang most charmingly 
a group of bird songs, and Mrs. Draper read 
an article concerning Elizabeth Gardner 
Bouguereau who, after her graduation from 
Lasell in 1856, studied abroad with Rosa 
Bonheur, met the great artist Bouguereau and 
was married to him when she was forty-six 
and he was seventy-two, after a courtship re- 
corded as the greatest love match of the studio. 
She is still painting in her own studio in Paris 
and writes of the fearful conditions prevailing 
there at the present state of siege. 

Miss Potter caused no little merriment by 
her "stunt" for 1880, and Dr. Winslow's 
ever-cordial word of welcome to all made the 
Alumnae feel that they are really doing some- 
thing by way of contributing to the increasing 
growth and success of the School. 

Dr. Bragdon's message expressed deepest 
disappointment that he could not be with us 
because he "ought not" and he sent his love 
to "all those who care." A unanimous greet- 
ing was sent to him from the Association with 
the assurance that the disappointment was 
mutual. 

Tribute was paid to the following Lasell 
girls who have passed away. 

Mrs. H. R. Hayden, '58. 

Mary L. Woods, 73. 

Etta Ellis Holway, '81. 

Roberta Clark Crull, '05. 

Ruth Butterfield Jones, '06. 

Dorothy Steele, '12-'13. 
The meeting was adjourned after joining in 



the new Alumnae song, written by Miss Ellen 
Palmer. 

Officers for next year. : 

President, Miss Lillian Packard, '83. 

Vice-President, Miss Lela Goodall, '08. 

Secretary, Mrs. Maude Simes Harding, '06 
Treasurer, Mrs. Ella Richardson Cushing, 73. 
Mid Winter Committee. 

Miss Mabel Whitney, '03. 

Miss Lulie C. Hogg, '88. 

Miss Evelyn Schmidt, '14. 
June Committee. 

Mrs. Etta Stafford Vaughan, '86. 

Miss Kathleen Knight, '11. 

Miss Nellie Woodward, '15. 
Executive Committee. 

Miss Lillie R. Potter, '80. 

Miss Ruth Bachelder, '12. 

Mrs. Katherine Washburn Peyser, '06. 
Maude Simes Harding, 

Assistant Secretary. 





SCENES FROM PLYMOUTH TRIP 




A FEW REMARKS FROM U$ 

New Trier Echoes — Would not a few ex- 
changes improve your magazine? In other 
respects it is so good that we have no criti- 
cisms to make on it. 

Commerce Caravel — Your literary depart- 
ment is fine; your cuts are good and your 
sketches add a great deal to your magazine. 
Your cover is appropriate. 

The Lit — Well arranged magazine; good 
departmental headings. On the whole a 
magazine well worth reading. 

Daedalian Quarterly — "That Handsome 
Beau" is one of many cleverly written stories 
in your magazine. Why have you no joke 
or personal departments? 

The Mirror — Your class notes are interest- 
ing not only to a student of your school, but 
to anyone who may chance to read them. 
You have top-notch literary and athletic 
departments. 

MedfordH. S. Review — We like your head- 
ings for departments. Good cover designs. 
We suggest, however, that the "ads" be 
kept in an exclusive place and not put in 
miscellaneously. 

The Iris — Interesting and well arranged 
magazine. Have you no athletics? Lasell 
girls are lovers of athletics; to us, therefore, 
it seems a serious omission. 

Miltonvale College Monitor — We like your 



magazine but wish you would enlarge your 
literary department. You could also take 
the suggestion offered to Marroon and White. 

The Echo — Your exchange and local de- 
partments are fine, but would not a few 
lively stories improve your paper? 

The Magpie — Your magazine deserves 
praise. It is well arranged and has complete 
departments. It is one of our most favored 
exchanges. 

The Student — Your article, "Women in 
Politics" is straightforward and direct and 
gives us some of your ideas about suffrage. 
On the whole your magazine deserves special 
mention. 

Pasco School News — We wish to congratu- 
late you on your paper. The cuts give us a 
clear idea of your fine type of students. Your 
departments are in good proportion. 

The Ramble — Is your school not large 
enough to support a magazine instead of a 
paper? Your reading matter is good and 
well arranged. 

The Quarterly Tatler — A splendidly ar- 
ranged paper. Departments in good pro- 
portion. The cuts add greatly to your maga- 
zine. 

The Roman — We are glad to see your 
paper again. We have not seen such an ex- 
cellent assortment of cuts in any of our 
exchanges. The illustrator for the headings 



LASELL LEAVES 



291 



of your departments certainly deserves a Iris; Daedalian Monthly; The Student; The 

great deal of credit as does the author of Miltonvale College Monitor; Pasco School 

"A Belgium War Romance." News; The Acropo lis; The Sturgis School; 

The Megaphone — A remarkable magazine The Goldenrod; The Opinion; Aegis; The 

in every respect. Another of our favorite Scroll; The High School Banner; The Brim- 

exchanges. Next year we hope to see you mer School Magazine; News; The Lit; The 

oftener. Commerce Caravel. 



A FEW REMARKS FROM OTHERS 

Lasell Leaves — We are waiting anxiously 
to see the outcome of "The Best Man." The 
Leaves is good all through. — The Mirror. 

The story "A True Heroine" in the Jan- 
uary Lasell Leaves, Boston, Mass., is very 
well written. Some jokes would probably 
improve your paper. — The Gleam. 

The Lasell Leaves, Boston, always is one 
of our best exchanges. No unfavorable 
comment can be made on it. — The Student. 

Lasell Leaves — A very good magazine with 
an interesting "Literary" department. Your 
"Local" department shows a good deal of 
school spirit and is written so well that it 
does not bore outsiders. But why put a 
part of your "ads" before your reading 
matter? This spoils the appearance of your 
otherwise well-arranged magazine. Your 
"jokes" do not come up to the standard of 
your other departments and it would be 
better to have more extensive and better 
jokes and not mix them up with your Ex- 
changes, or leave them out entirely. Your 
magazine on the whole is excellent with no 
serious defects. — The Quarterly Tatler. 

The exchange column of the Lasell Leaves 
of Auburndale, Mass., is better than that of 
any other magazine we have received. A 
few of the column headings could stand im- 
provement. — The Opinion. 



Lasell Leaves acknowledges with thanks 
the receipt of the following exchanges: 

The Magpie; The Maron and White; New 
Trier Echoes; Boston University Beacon; The 
Hermonite; M. H. S. Review; The Gleam; 
The Optimist; The Tiger; The Owl; The Quar- 
terly Tatler; The Echo; The Mitrror; The 



'Ever see a close race?" 

'Sure! I spent three months in Scotland." — 



Ex. 



Prof.— -"Aren't you taking my course this 
year? 

Student — "Can't possibly. I walk in my 
sleep." — Ex. 



Possible Employer — "Hm! so you want a 
job, eh? Do you ever tell lies?" 

Applicant— "No, sir, but I kin learn." 
Ex. 



Dentist — "Open wider, please — wider." 
Patient— "A- A- A- Ah." 

Dentist — (Inserting rubber gag, towel, and 
sponge.) — "How's your family?"— Ex. 



"I understand that you have a new motor- 



car. 



"Yes." 

"Do you drive it yourself?" 

"Nobody drives it. We coax it." — Ex. 



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New England's 
Greatest Store 

FOR THEIR VARIOUS NEEDS 



Here one may choose from 

unequaled assortments of 

Clothing Furnishing Rugs Pictures 

Artwares Trunks and Luggage 

and the many other things so frequently 
needed during college days 



Best of all, selection here is never from 
commonplace stock but from the best that 
Europe and America can produce 



Jordan Marsh Company 



BOSTON 



Tailored 

HATS 

New Models for Misses 
$10.00 and $15.00 




Believing that the plainest tailored hat 
should have as much style and individual- 
ity as the most elaborate dress hat, Chan- 
dler & Co. represent the best models of 
Paris and London — yet at very moderate 
prices. 

Cfjanbler & Company 

151 Fremont Street, JSoaton 



LASELL LEAVES 



293 



C. F. Hovey Company 

Summer, Chauncy and Avon Streets 

BOSTON, MASS. 

OUR MILLINERY 

Combines Style and Quality 

New Hats in 

Sailors, Pokes, Turbans and 

Tricones 

Dress Hats Afternoon Hats 

Tailor Hats 

Hair Hats with Flowers 

Large Sailors with Wings 

Maline Hats with Handsome 

Bows and Flowers 

$10.00 to $21.50 




The Plastic Shoe 



(Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 




In Low or High Cut 
and also in Pumps 



The Plastic Shoe 
is the result of 30 
years of study in 
the search for a 
shoe that will help 
all foot troubles and 
still retain a grace- 
ful appearance. 

The Plastic Shoe 
assists one to walk 
as nature intended. 
It removes the 
strain and ache 
resulting from walk- 
ing or standing in 
ill fitting shoes. 



Thayer, McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



When You Visit Lasell Stop at 

NYE PARK INN 

46 GROVE STREET 
Between the Seminary and Station 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 
FIRE PROOF GARAGE 



294 



LASELL LEAVES 



CHINA AND GLASS 

The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in this line 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glass 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits every season by our buyers to the 
best makers in Great Britain, France, Germany, Austria and Amer- 
ica. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS Gallery 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

FRANKLIN, COR. HAWLEY ST., BOSTON 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 

Compliments of 
GEO. J. BARKER LUMBER CO. 



WALTHAM, MASS. 

Georg'e C. Folsom 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 

W. F. HADLOCK 
Newsdealer and Stationer 

Developing and Printing 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CAPODANNO & ALBANO 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco. 

331 AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Tel. Con. 

C. A. DONOVAN 

345 AUBURN STREET AUBURNDALE 

Ladies' and Men's Furnishings 
Dry Goods and Small Wares 

ELLIOTT W. KEYES 
PHARMACIST 
Drugs- Medicines-Chemicals-Choice Confections 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 



HAYDEN 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 

College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 

COTTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 
CAPS and GOWNS 

to the American Universities and 
Colleges, to Lasell Seminary and 
scores of other Academies. 

CLASS CONTRACTS A 
SPECIALTY. 

PULPIT and CHOIR GOWNS™ 

ncwton Ice Company 

MILLER BROS. 

Addr? 8 f! ce Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 



PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Receipts 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 PORTLAND STREET, BOSTON 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for Price List of over 60 kinds 





CARDS AND GIFTS 

ortio Ke^w ^tioj3 

149 TREMONT ST., ROOM 923, BOSTON, MASS. 

Waists and Dresses Made at Low Prices 
WAISTS $3.50 DRESSES $8.00 & $10.00 

C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 
fflu&it Bealers 

Announce their Removal to 

2B Park Street, Boston. Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Three doors above their old store. Send for our recent 
catalogues. Mail orders filled the same day as received. 
Music sent on selection if desired. 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



295 



SCHOOL 
STATIONERY 



Note Books 

Students' Paper 
Fountain Pens, etc. 



Engraved and Printed 



Programs 



Invitations 



Dance Orders 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON 7 SQUARE 



BOSTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 686 Haymarket 



SPORT COATS 
MACK1NAWS 



SERGE MIDDY SUITS 



SPECIALTIES 

FOR 

COLLEGE GIRLS 



Send for Illustrated Booklet 

Henry S. Lombard 

22 to 26 Mercants Row 
BOSTON, MASS. 




Ladies are delighted 

with the results of using Camp- 
bell's Stain on Floors, Furni- 
ture and Woodwork. 

Gives superb finish, brings out 
the natural grain of the wood. 
Write for color card 

Carpenter-Morton Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Established 1882 



Incorporated 1904 



GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Cogtumtr$ 

6 Boylston Place, Boston, Mass. 

College Dramatic Work a Specialty 
Telephone Oxford 145 



Jfflaugu3 
printing 
Company 

jWassarimjsetts 



296 LASELL LEAVES 



Telephones Hay market 2311-2312 



Flowers 
of Quality 



HOUGHTON -GORNEY CO 

:-: Florists :-: 



119 TREMONT STREET, 

[Park Street Church] 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Specialty 

Flower Shop of Boston 



FLOWERS' TELEGRAPHED TO ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Free Delivery to Lasell 



A photograph of Distinction made at your Summer home by 

Horns; Jfabtan Pacfjracf) 

will possess a rare charm acquired by long experience in taking people, 

especially children in their accustomed surroundings. 

Incidentally there is no more attractive place to make a portrait than 

a Summer home where there are many opportunities for natural 

backgrounds. 

We make no extra charge over our studio prices for going to your 

home anywhere. 

647 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON 

COPLEY SQUARE Telephone 4155-4156 Back Bay. 

Studios also in Providence and Worcester 



nun nwinaTT— irmT—mriTnrH mim m-m-i—-- ■—— 



L. P. HOLLANDER CO, 

202 Boylston Street 



The New Spring Designs in 
DRESSES, SUITS, GOATS 
and MILLINERY 

are beginning to arrive, and should 
prove interesting to every girl who 
takes pride in her personal appear- 
ance. 



Orders by mail will receive prompt 
and careful attention. 



When in Boston 

Lunch at the 

CONSIGNOR'S UNION 

25 Temple Place 

Luncheon 1 1-3 Afternoon Tea 3-5 

Home-made Bread, Cake. Pies, etc. Served 
and on Sale. 



Advertise 

in the 
LEAVES 




L_ 



FALL, NUMBER 

OCTOBER 



1915 




BOSTON 
STUDIOS 

161 TREMONT ST. 

Tel. Ox. 858 
164 TREMONT ST. 

Tel. Ox. 2687 




NEW YORK 
STUDIO 

306 FIFTH AVENUE 



HTHE distinctive individuality of our photo- 
*• graphs will appeal to you. They repre- 
sent a wonderful advance in methods — and 
while the elements that enter into their pro- 
duction are the most expensive known in the 
Art of Photography, the cost will be to you 
will be no more than that of the indifferently 
made photograph. 

Your patronage is most cordially invited. 

: Class photographs for Lasell Seminary 



V RETAIL 



CHARGE 



Our Stock Never Gets Old 

NEW GOODS ARRIVE EVERY DAY 



Diamonds 
Watches 
Silver Goods 
Combs 
Cut Gass 
Coral Jewelry 
Roman F earls 
Ebony Goods 



Vanity Cases 
Photo Frames 
Leather Goods 
Fountain Pens 
Brass Good3 
Chafing Dishes 
Percolators 
Parisian Ivory 



Our Watch and Jewelry Repair Departments do 
the best work at very low prices 



MR. F. F. DAVIDSON 
AUBURNDALE 



LASELL LEAVES 




A 

Coming-out 
Announcement 

(~)ER new department, devoted ex- 
clusively to misses apparel, has 
just made its opening bow — and is 
already one of the most popular 
debutantes in the world of fashion. 
Our third floor is now given over 
to showing unusual styles and val- 
ues in misses apparel. 



JF. $. ©'Connor Co. 

157 Fremont §bl., Boston 



New England's Leading Specialty Shop. — Suits — Gowns 
Coats —furs — Blouses — Neckweai Hosiery 



*><- i _»-«- .-» 



1 




OUR STOCK OF 

LADIES' FURS 



shows the smartest and most popular 
styles for the Fall and Winter season. We 
buy only from reliable Furriers and can 
save you from 25% to 30% on every piece 
we sell. 



P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 




An excellent book 
for Music Students 

DEVELOPMENT 

OF 

SYMPHONIC MUSIC 

T. W SURETTE 

$1.25 



The Boston Music Company 

26 & 28 West St. 26 & 28 

BOSTON MASS. 



LASELL LEAVES 



AN OLD CARPET HOUSE 

"C10R 98 YEARS we have been dealing in Floor Coverings, and 
■*■ today we are undoubtedly the best known Carpet and Rug 
House in New England. 

We have more capital invested in Floor Coverings than any other con- 
cern in Boston, we show a much larger assortment and our prices are 
as low, if not lower, than elsewhere. 

We have customers in nearly every State in the Union, and many fami- 
lies have traded with us for several generations. 

For many years we have supplied the Carpets used in Lasell Seminary. 

Our Record Should Invite Your Confidence 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

646 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St., Boston 



Meyer Jonasson & Co 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Waists, Shirts, Sweaters 

and Furs 



GARMENTS FOR SEMINARY GIRLS 
A SPECIAL FEATURE 




THE NEW WALKING TOOT 

A New Model in Lace or Button in Dull Calf or Paten 

Leather with Cloth or Kid Top, Low Heels. Ridinj 

Boots and Dress Boots in many styles. 

10% cash discount to students and faculty of Lasell 
160 Tremont Street, Boston 



1 ih K i in 



DUX FEMINA FACTr' 



Vol, XXXXI LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., OCTOBER. 1915 No. 

Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-clas3 matter at the Boston. Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 
JESSIE SHEPHERD 



Local Editor 
MAUDE HAYDEN 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



Editor-in-chief 
CAROL RICE 

Art Editor 
CHARLOTTE WHITING 

Personal Editor 
HELEN MERRILL 



Subscription Editor 
JESSIE SHEPHERD 

Assistant Subscription Editor 
MARGARET POWELL 



Exchange Editor 
ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 

Off for a Morning Galop 4 Editorial 14 

Literary 5 Personal 16 

Locals 9 Exchanges 23 

Supplement 25 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar Inside front cover 

Thomas Long Inside front cover 

F. P. O'Connor Co 1 

Boston Music Co 1 

P. P.Adams 1 

T. E. Moseley Co 2 

Mever Jonasson & Co 2 

John H. Pray & Sons Co 2 

Jordan Marsh Co 33 

Thayer McNeil Co 33 

C H. Hovey & Co ii 

Houghton Gorney Co 34 and 35 

Wellesley Inn 35 

Delicatessen Store 35 

Capodanno & Albano 35 

Hayden 35 

Newton Trust Co 36 

Pinkham & Smith 36 

Lasell Inn 36 

Chandler & Co 37 



Angus & Clark 37 

Kornfeld 37 

English Tea Room 38 

A. Shuman & Co *38 

Damon *38 

H. S. Lombard 38 

A. T. Bridges 39 

Smith Bros 39 

Sands Furber 39 

Collins & Fairbanks 39 

F. W. Davis . . . '39 

George C. Folsom 39 

Boulevard Pharmacy 40 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton 40 

Carpenter. Morton 40 

George P. Ravmond 40 

Woodland Park Hotel 40 

T. D. Whitney 40 

C. W. Thompson 40 




■i 



1 




i 
2 



IN THE CORDOVA MOUNTAINS 

A few years ago I was staying with my 
mother and sisters in the Cordova Moun- 
tains. Our house was situated in a rather 
lonely part of the mountains which were a 
distance of eight hundred miles from Buenos 
Aires where my father had gone on business. 

The nearest houses at all were a few little 
wooden huts, near the railway station which 
was merely an empty box car with a chair 
and table inside. One of the few houses was 
used for a small store where canned food and 
a few other things could be got. For most of 
our food we had to send a long distance. Meat 
was not to be had nearer than thirty miles, 
and butter had to be fetched from an "es- 
tancho" twenty miles away. The distances 
mentioned will give some idea of the remote 
ness of the region. 

About five o'clock one morning my sister 
May and I started off on horseback for a 
day's Vide in the mountains, bent on looking 
for excitement. Our search was rewarded 
as you shall presently learn. 

May carried her rifle slung over her shoulder 
and we each had bags of food strapped to 
our saddles. We rode, about all the morn- 
ing stopping only for breakfast, and lunch, 
by some rippling stream. During the morn- 
ing my sister shot several partridges 
which we put in an extra bag we had with us, 
and strapped it with the others to her saddle. 

In the Cordova Mountains trees are few 



and far between. On our way home, howeverj 
May saw one with a very large nest in the 
branches. Being greatly interested in birds' 
eggs of which she had several she sug- 
gested that I hold the horses while she 
tried to get at the nest. 

Finding the tree too high for her to reach 
the nest from the ground, I led one of the 
horses underneath so that she could stand oti 
his back. 

The extra height enabled her to put her 
hand in the nest from which she took out an 
immense brown eagle's egg. 

We had barely mounted our horses again 
when we saw r , flying straight towards us, a 
very large eagle evidently the owner of the 
nest, which looked as if he meant to attack 
us. Throwing her reins to me, May grabbed 
her rifle, and taking careful aim, fired be- 
tween her horses' ears. 

Like rail mountain ponies this one had been 
trained to the sound of a gun and therefore 
not minding it in the slightest, never moved a 
muscle. There was an anxious moment for 
my sister, not wishing to kill the bird, unless 
it was absolutely necessary had shot at one of 
his outspread wings. 

For a second we were not sure whether the 
bullet had reached its mark. Suddenly the 
huge creature dropped to the ground. Think- 
ing he was unable to move, May dismounted 
and went towards the place where the in- 
jured eagle was vainly trying to fly. As 



6 LASELL LEAVES 

she approached, the bird regarded her with a By the time we got started for home with 

fierce and angry glare, then giving a shrill the eagle, it was quite late in the afternoon, 

screech, turned round and began to run We still had several miles to cover, but these 

desperately, one wing trailing uselessly after we had to accomplish at a walking pace. My 

him. May had attained her object. mother and sister were greatly surprised to 

After trying for some time to catch the see us, come riding up to the house, at 

bird which although wounded could run very dusk, with the ferocious bird, and they 

fast, May at last returned to where I was made us recount our adventure in full almost 

waiting with the horses and mounted, saying before we got off our horses, 

that the only thing to do was to ride the eagle For several nights we put the bird in the 

down. :So I galloped on for he had run securest place we had, namely the tool shed, 

quite a distance, then made a wide circle, During one of these nights, however, to our 

coming round in front of the bird, which sorrow and chagrin he made his escape, 

promptly turned, only to be headed off by He was such a beautiful bird, large, strong, 

May. and fierce looking that he would have made a 

For half an hour or more, we kept the bird fine picture for an artist's brush. Had he 

running but mostly in a circle, trying to dodge not escaped we were going to take him back 

our horses, as we rode round near him. Dur- with us to England and give him to the Zoo- 

ing that time he was obviously becoming logical Gardens. 

tired, the very thing we wanted. Once when But, to judge by the way he acted when we 
he thought our vigilance was slightly relaxed had him, he would always have rebelled 
he rested for half a second; seeing this we against his captivity. Perhaps, then, it is 
stopped our pursuit. Whereupon he stood as well that he again found his freedom be- 
at a safe distance and glared at us furiously, fore it was too late. 

As we saw that he was unwilling to run any Gertrude Shaw 

longer unless obliged, May dismounted, and 

while I kept guard she quickly unsaddled her A TRUTH 

horse and took off the saddle blanket. Prudy was comfortably curled up on the 

Getting the sign fro'm her, I diverted the huge couch before the fire-place. She was 

bird's attentiOm, and in that second, May ran apparently interested in her story book and 

silently up behind and threw the blanket very much at peace with the world. In 

deftly over his head. Then she grasped him reality, the two big eyes that were fastened 

tightly with both hands. We hUad at last upon the white pages, snapped and sparkled 

caught the eagle, but the bird with an angry with angry resentment as her little ears took 

cry, struggled so desperately that May had in the conversation. 

all she could do to hold the creature while I "I know that Hal went through college 

fetched some rope which we had with us, and with only a high-school preparation, George," 

helped her tie his legs together. Prudy heard her mother saying, "but I also 

I then saddled her horse and having h dped know that it would be much easier for Joe, 

her to mount, we again started for home, if he went to a college preparatory school 

May found riding no easy matter with a where he would get special attention. Joe 

heavy eagle tucked under one arm, his head isn't quite as bright as Hal, anyway." 

just showing from the blanket. The golden "Joe is as bright as any fourteen-year old 

eyes sent out many malicious glances and the youngster I have ever seen," retorted Father 

cruel curved beak made many futile attempts slightly irritated. 

to peck her face, but he was too cleverly held "You must admit he doesn't pay any heed 

to gain his desires. to lessons, then," Mother returned in an 



LASELL LEAVES 



appeasing tone. "Still, I suppose it is be- 
cause he has always been so mischievous 
that he hasn't had time for his studies. 
That's another thing, George. He needs to 
be taught obedience ; I'm afraid I let both him 
and Prudy off too easy. I declare I can hard- 
ly do a thing with those two monkeys any 
more!" In spite of the volcano raging with- 
in her, Prudy chuckled to herself at this last 
remark and Father was heard to grumble 
something about "time, parties and tom- 
foolery." Neither Prud nor her mother 
caught the import of the words. 

"Well, what do you think?" Mrs. Jaffray 
asked after a rather awkward silence. She 
was slightly piqued at the unfavorable atti- 
tude her husband had taken. 

I think it's all foolishness, if you want to 
know the honest truth," he burst forth. 
"What good will it do? Not a speck. I 
didn't have a college education but I notice 
I'm supporting a family of five, very well. 
Now, there's Hal, a finer, smarter boy you 
couldn't find and instead of coming home to 
work, he goes gallivanting off to Europe, a 
week after graduation, to have a good time. 
That's what a college education does for a 
boy!" 

Prud sniffed. What had come over her 
father? She remembered well the day of 
Hal's graduation; how proud he was of his 
big, handsome son; how he had urged him 
to go abroad for a three months' jaunt be- 
fore getting down to the grind of business; 
how he boasted to his friends at home that 
his sons were going to have the best possible 
education ;that already his eldest son had 
proved what an exceptionally fine thing a 
college education was; how he had even be- 
moaned the fact that he hadn't had one him- 
self. Oh, the inconsistency of man! 

The sputtering finally subsided. "You 
know best, of course, dear, so I'll not say 
another word about it," said Mrs. Jaffray 
softly as she rose to leave the room. Father 
groaned inwardly. Why was she always so 
dear and good about things he refused her. 



This submissive manner — oh, well, let her 
have her own way! Mother always seemed 
to be right, anyway, in spite of his judgment. 
He wouldn't give in immediately, though. 
No, sir! 

He looked extraordinarily cross and for- 
bidding as he sat entrenched behind his 
crinkly newspaper, but as Mother passed be- 
hind his chair and gently patted his head, the 
hard, determined lines disappeared and he 
broke into a merry chuckle. 

"You win, Mother," he cried almost 
boyishly while he clasped her caressing hand. 
"Have your own way — it's always best in 
the long run, I've learned. Mother's always 
right." 

So they began to make plans for their 
younger son's education, Father becoming 
far more enthusiastic as they progressed 
than Mother. She began to realize what it 
would mean to be separated from her little 
mad-cap boy. And Prudence? What would 
the poor child do without her pal and brother? 
She spoke this last thought aloud. 

"Oh, Prud!" scoffed Father, "she can look 
out for herself and learn to live without Joe. 
She'll have to begin some time and there is 
no time like the present." 

"Yes, I suppose she'll soon forget him," 
agreed Mother and dismissed that thought. 

It was then that Prudence began seriously 
to think what Joe's departure would mean to 
her. Life without Joe? Half the fun would 
be gone! Mother and Father didn't think 
of that. No one thought about her, what she 
would like or what she wouldn't. Mother 
and Father didn't love her that was all. 
Nobody loved her. Well, maybe Virginia 
loved her a little speck — she would go up- 
stairs and find out. She slipped noiselessly 
from the couch, tip-toed out of the room and 
upstairs to seek her sister, Virginia, a debu- 
tante of a year who seemed to understand her 
better than anyone — except Mother, of 
course. A lump rose in Prud's throat — 
Mother didn't love her any more, she only 
loved Joe, Virginia and Hal, made plans for 



* 



LASELL LEAVES 



them but not for her. Prud swallowed hard 
to wash away that great big lump and then 
began to skip down to Virginia's room. 
. '.'/What is it, Prud?" asked big sister, turn- 
ing away from the long mirror where she was 
combing her hair. No wonder, thought 
Prud, she was so reluctant to take her eyes 
from her lovely reflection, merely to rest 
them upon her freckle-faced, sun-burned, 
little sister. 

"May I go to the lawn-party with you this 
afternoon, Ginger? I'll be awful good." 
She had not intended to ask that for she 
really didn't care about going, but one has 
to say something — one can't ask outright for 
sympathy. 

"Why, you dear little goose, whatever got 
that into your head! You didn't get an in- 
vitation, dear, and besides you aren't old 
enough yet. Now run along, I want to get 
dressed." 

The lump again presented itself, only this 
time much larger and more dangerously 
near the surface. Hurriedly she turned and 
left her sister's room. The cruel injustice of 
it all. Why didn't she get an invitation? 
Why wasn't she old enough? Why did Joe 
have to have an education? Why didn't 
anybody love her? She flung herself in her 
own little bed and sobbed these ques- 
tions to herself. Well, if nobody loved 
her she would leave them and then they'd 
all be sorry. She would take some cookies, 
steal down cellar, out through the cellar door 
and take the road that led past old Mr. 
Flannigan's farm. Then, she would meet 
some nice old lady, who would take care of 
her, who would appreciate and love her. 

She would grow up to be beautiful, even 
more beautiful than Virginia, marry a rich, 
handsome Count, or Duke, and live happily 
ever after. The more vividly she pictured this 
wild dream, the more determined she be- 
came to set out upon her journey. 

Preparations were easily made, although the 
cookies had to be given up because Annie, the 
cook, was still in the kitchen and she might 
ask questions. Prud slipped out of the cel- 



lar door, just as she had planned, taking 
unnecessary precautions as she made her 
way through the garden, to conceal herself 
behind shrubs and bushes. At last she was 
on her journey. 

As she trudged along in the dusty country 
road, the novelty of her expedition soon be- 
gan to wear off. She wished she had taken 
Jumbo, her pony, with her. Then, she re- 
membered that Father had told her that 
very morning that she couldn't ride Jumbo 
until he recovered from his lameness. Her 
bitter resentment took fire once more; tears 
sprang to her eyes. Her feet hurt her; the 
sun was unmercifully hot; no one loved her 
and she wished she were dead. Oh, how she 
hated everybody and everything! So deep 
in her reveries was she, that she no longer 
watched her way. Her tortured little feet, 
ever faithful to their mistress, carried her to 
the grass-hedged road-side where one, worn 
out by this unusual treatment, collided with a 
stone and sent its owner flat upon the ground. 
Grief, then, took full sway. 

Henry Hamilton was returning from the 
Country Club at a leisurely pace which was 
quite uncommon for that young man. That 
morning, he had played a splendid game of 
golf besides being highly amused by the gay 
chatter of his young friends on the club veranda. 
Nevertheless, he had broken away from the 
group on the plea of extra work at the office 
Why had he done it^ He didn't exactly 
know himself. Perhaps he was tired. Per- 
haps he wanted to be alone in order to think 
of the handsome girl he had passed that 
morning. He smiled as he recalled how easily 
she managed her horse as it frisked and danced 
at the side of the road. Slowing his roadster 
down he gave the girl the idea that his 
thoughts were only for the welfare of her 
high-spirited horse but he took the oppor- 
tunity to snatch more than a hurried glance 
at the young rider so trim in her black habit. 
She had smiled her acknowledgement of the 
courtesy and cantered on. 

[to be continued) 



MSBA 




l l , 'r.-!i/lii!ii*l|W 



* '■■ i', :i% ..' ■ V 



\i\ " 



SSI 




Wl» t ■WM T lll Mil 



OPENING NIGHT 

Wednesday night, September 22, as we 
came down into the dining room, our ears 
were greeted by the music of an orchestra 
which played pleasingly all through the five 
courses of the excellent dinner. 

After Miss Potter had announced that the 
whole school was invited to go out into the 
gymnasium to dance the girls lost no time 
in getting there and choosing partners. There, 
to the tune of "Will you give me the fifth?" 
Oh, the eighth then!" and "Don't forget that 
third" we managed to arrange some im- 
promptu programs. The dance was very 
informal but it closed a very happy evening 
both for the old girls who were so glad to get 
back and meet the new girls ; and for the new, 
who were thus introduced into our good times 
at Lasell. 



FROLIC IN THE GYM 

The announcement made in chapel, the 
morning of Saturday, the 25th of September, 
that the whole school was invited to the gym- 
nasium for a frolic that evening received 
hearty applause. Helen Overholser, presi- 
dent of Christian Endeavor, explained that we 



were all to come out for an informal "good 
time," and to bring pillows. 

That night, at 7.30 the gymnasium rapidly 
filled, so that when the "Obstacle Race" was 
announced there was a crowd of on-lookers. 
Out of about six girls, both old and new who 
attempted the race, Helen Gerrett made the 
best time, going over the steps, rope, horse, 
and walking a "balance board" in eleven 
seconds. 

When the "obstacles" had been removed, 
the girls filled up the space, facing the stage, 
where the rest of the entertainment took 
place. The members of last year's Glee Club 
who are back this year, Naomi Bradley, 
Onalee Lang, Dorice Lord, Laura Hale, and 
Norma MacMillan, sang some of the encores 
which were so popular last year. The girls 
appeared to enjoy them very much, especially 
the one concerning a "Perfect Day at La- 
sell" 

The Glee Club then sang some songs which 
were familiar enough to the girls so that every- 
body joined in. 

The pillows were then disposed of and the 
girls danced for the rest of the evening. 
Some of our girls who have the gift of "tick- 



10 



LASELL LEAVES 



ling the ivories" and who were public-spirited 
or generously inclined supplied us with good 
dance music. The evening ended much too 
soon, the girls all agree. 



THE LAUNCH RIDES 

Thursday afternoon, September the twen- 
ty-third, eighty of us girls enjoyed a launch 
ride on the Charles River. We went in two 
parties, one leaving the school at 2.30 and the 
other at 3.30. Our party, chaperoned by Miss 
Collins, Miss Irwin, Miss Packard and Miss 




Witherbee, heard snatches of glowng ac- 
counts from the others, who were leaving the 
boat landing as we reached it. Our highest 
hopes were realized, as we steamed down the 
winding river between the lovely wooded 
banks as far as the Waltham Pumping 
Station, where we turned. The old girls who 
had had that ride before were as charmed 
with the beauties of the river as were the new 
girls who were viewing it all for the first time. 



OLD GIRLS— NEW GIRLS DANCE 

On Saturday evening, October the second, 
the Old Girls gave their annual Dance to the 
New Girls in the gym. Through the kindness 
of Anna Cornwall, perfectly wonderful music 
was furnished by Walter Johnson's Boston 
Orchestra. They seemed to enjoy playing as 
much as we did dancing, and were very 
generous with their encores. The delicious 
punch disappeared early in the evening, 
but we were enjoying the dancing by that 
time too well to miss it. Despite the crowded 



condition of the gymnasium, gay couples 
wound in and out with remarkable ease. 
Altogether the evening was a great success. 
Everyone said she had "had the time of her 
life." 

THE BUNKER HILL TRIP 
A party of sixty-five girls went on the trip 
to Bunker Hill and the Navy Yard, Monday, 
morning, October fourth. The party chap- 
eroned by Mr. Ordway left the elevated train 
at City Square and went to the Navy Yard 
first, but the rest of us stayed on until we 
came to Thompson Square. From there we 
had a short walk up a steep hill to the foot of 
Bunker Hill Monument. The statue of Col. 




SCENES FROM THE TOP OF 
BUNKER HILL MONUMENT 

Wm. Prescott stands in front of the monu- 
ment. One of the girls remarked that he 
appeared to be petrified from standing there 
so long in one position. We walked around 
the monument to see the bronze tablets 
marking the place where the trenches were 
once behind which our soldiers fought. One 
of the girls asked Miss Rand if the fence along 
the top of the slope behind the monument was 
the original fence. Most of us bought a few 
post cards to send home and then all but 
three climbed the two hundred and ninety- 
five steps to get the beautiful view of the 
surrounding city. 

From Bunker Hill we had a short walk to 
the Navy Yard; as we entered we had to 
check our cameras, lest we carry away any 
secrets. The first sound that reached us 
was the martial music of a Marine Band. 
Near the bandstand a company of Marines 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



were going through the Manual of Arms. 
Our party was fortunate enough to be allowed 
on and escorted over three ships, — "The Con- 
stitution" ("Old Ironsides") the torpedo 
boat destroyer, "dishing," and the crui- 
ser, "Chicago." Several other ships were there 



Although Mrs. Shaw did not win all of us 
to her point of view, she set us to thinking. 




being overhauled, among them a revenue cutter, 
a cadet training ship, and a torpedo boat. 
After leaving the Navy Yard we took the 
elevated train at City Square and as we sank 
into our seats there were heard sighs of weari- 
ness mingled with bits of conversation about 
the worth-while things we had just seen. 



GLEE CLUB OFFICERS 

We are very glad to announce the result of 
the Glee Club elections, which are as follows: 

President, Onalee Lang; Vice-President, 
Naomi Bradley; Secretary and Treasurer, 
Mildred Cloake; Leader, Dorice Lord and 
Business Manager, Norma McMillan. 

With such officers, the work of the Glee Club 
this year will surely be a success. 

LECTURES 

On the first Thursday of the term, we en- 
oyed a very interesting talk from Mrs. Shaw, 
the mother of one of our new girls. Mrs. Shaw 
has been an active militant suffragist in 
England and so she could tell us very clearly 
some of the reasons for which the women of 
England have been willing to risk their lives 
and reputations. 

The most interesting story was the one in 
which Mrs. Shaw told how she, with the help 
of just a few others, managed to get the W. 
S. P. U. banner up on London Tower. It 
was a very interesting story and well told. 



Thursday afternoon, September 30, Miss 
Potter gave us a talk on "Manners and Cus- 
toms." She spoke of the manners which 
hold both here and elsewhere. We hope that 
this gentle reminder will be sufficient and 
that Miss Potter and the rest of the teachers 
will be able to commend the manners of all 
of the 1915-1916 girls. 



DR. VINCENT'S LECTURE 

Wednesday evening, September the twenty- 
ty-ninth, Dr. Leon H. Vincent gave an il- 
luminating lecture on "Victor Hugo." We 
were all glad to welcome Dr. Vincent back 
once more, and are pleasantly anticipating 
the remaining three lectures of this year's 
course. 



SCHOOL ROSTER 



Allen, Gertrude 
Anderson, R. E. Virgi 
Asbury, Dorothy M. 
Astill, Lillian M. 
At twill, Orissa M. 
Babcock, Edith 
Baker, Florence E. 
Baker, Gertrude M. 
Barnes, Dorothy 
Bauman, Helen L. 
Beach, Marion 
Beatty, Fleet A. 
Bell, Florence 
Berg, Ruth E. 
Berkey, Wilda I. 
Bickford, Jacquelin T 
Bisbee, Louise 
Boehner, Ruth L. 
Bordages, Eloise C. 
Bradley, Naomi S. 
Brady, Hazel 
Brate, Dorothy 
Brooks, Helen E. 
Buettner, Gertrude C, 
Burbank, Judith 
Burnap, Ruth M. 
Burt, Josephine 
Busey, M. Jeannette 
Cabrera, Rosenda 
Canfield, Mary E. 
Carleton, Elizabeth 
Carlisle, Elizabeth K. 
Chan, Mae T. 
Chase, Kathryn E. 
Christie, Beulah M. 
Cloake, Mildred P. 
Cottrell, Lucile 



Melrose, Mass. 
nia Jamestown, N. Y. 
Bloomfield, N. J. 
Providence, R. I. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Maiden, Mass. 
Edgewood, R. I. 
Johnson, Vt. 
Pratt, Kans. 
Grayling, Mich. 
New Milford. Conn. 
Three Rivers, Mich. 
Attleboro Falls, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Claremont, N. H. 
Newport News, Va. 
Rumford, Me. 
Malvern, Iowa. 
Beaumont. Tex. 
Boliver, N. Y. 
Bloomfield, N. ]. 
Albany, N. Y. 
So. Berwick, Me. 
Chicago, 111. 
Thompsonville, Conn. 
Whitinsville, Mass. 
Urbana, 111. 
Urbana, 111. 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Germantown, Philadelphia, 
N. Weymouth, Mass. 
Cleveland, O. 
Wakefield, Mass. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



Coward, Beulah E. 
Crane, Dorothy 
Crane, Edna L. 
Dana, Gertrude 
Dearborn, Katherine L. 
Deering, Dorothy 
Dickey, Hallie J. 
Drought, Elizabeth M. 
Egerton, Beatrice 
Edwards, Edna A. 
Edwards, Mildred E. 
Fera, A. Lavinia 
Flattery, Georgina K. 
Folkers, Lucile E. 
Foster, Helen J. 
Frankel, Emelia K. 
Fraser, Gladys G. 
Freeman, Helen F. 
Frey, Harriet M. 
Garnsey, M. Adolphia 
Gates, Fannie M. 
Gaty, Cornelia V. 
Gerrett, Helen S. 
Graham, Clara 
Gratz, Merveille M. 
Griffin, Marion M. 
Griffin, Ruth E. 
Hale, Laura S. 
Hall, Marguerite 
Halstead, Christine 
Hammond, Sarah M. 
Harper, Florence O. 
Harris, Frances M. 
Harris, Ruth 
Harrison, Flora M. 
Harvey, Marion 
Hauck, Lena M. 
Hayden, Maude J. 
Hayward, Nora I. 
Hersfield, Harriette 
Hinners, Mildred J. 
Hobson, Edith H. 
Holman, Edith C. 
Hotchkiss, Anita D. 
Houghton, H. Marie 
Houston, Rachel A. 
Hovey, Bettina 
Howe, Helen N. 
Hunter, Frances 
Jenks, Alice B. 
Jillson, Mildred O. 
Johnson, Malvina E. 
Jones, Margaret V. 
Judd, Pauahi 
Keppel, M. Marie 
Krueger, Viola C. 
Laffey, Lillian E. 
Lang, F. Onalee 
Lang, M. Antoinette 
Lang, Phyllis H. 
Laprey, Helene M. 
Larkin, Isabel M. 
Lawton, Lillian S. 
Lerch, Marion A. 
Lesh, Helen L. 
Leventhal, Jennie 
Lewis, Violet 
Libby, Mildred B. 
Linke, Gertrude S. 
Lipps, Julia 



Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 

Sparrow's Point, Md. 

Negaunee, Mich. 

Roxbury, Mass. 

Nashua, N. H. 

Biddeford, Me. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Corry, Pa. 

Harvard, Mass. 

Sour Lake, Tex. 

Kingston, R. I. 

Chicago, 111. 

Brookline, Mass. 

Frankfort, 111. 

Newport, Vt. 

Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Campaign, 111. 

Urbana, 111. 

Utica, N. Y. 

Chicago, 111. 

Chittenango, N. Y. 

Morristown, N. J. 

Greenfield, Mass. 

Lima, O. 

New York City 

North Bloomfield, Conn. 

Onset, Mass. 

So. Glastonbury, Conn. 

Holliston, Mass. 

ClasonPt., N. Y. City 

Rockville, Conn. 

Still Pond, Md. 

Rumford, Me. 

New York City 

Houlton, Me. 

Richford, Vt. 

Portsmouth, O. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

Middleville, Mich. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Rogers Park, Chicago, 111. 

Mount Airy, Philadelphia, Pa 

Sergeant Bluff, Iowa. 

Seymour, Conn. 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

So. Charlestown, O. 

New York City 

Melrose, Mass. 

Kankakee, 111. 

Pawtucket, R. 1. 

So. Attleboro, Mass. 

Winthrop, Mass. 

Utica, N. Y. 

Auburndale. Mass. 

Corry, Pa. 

Newark, N. J. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Waverly, N. Y. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Waverly, N. Y. 

Providence, R. I. 

Mukwonago, Wis. 

Brattleboro, Vt. 

Columbus, O. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Cambridge, Mass. 

North Dartmouth, Mass. 

Gorham.N. H. 

New Britain, Conn. 

So. Bethlehem, Pa. 



Long, Ariel E. 
Lord, Dorice M. 
Louis, Helen M. 
Luden, Marjorie 
MacMillan, Norma C. 
MacMillan, Orrea 
Mathias, Dorothy 
McCarty, Eleanor LeP. 
McCausland, Eleanor F. 
McCulloch, Henrietta 
Mclntyre, Margaret S. 
McLellan, Hazel 
Merrill, Helen M. 
Moore, Mary Frances 
Moore, Virginia 
Morris, Florence H. 
Morrison, Marjorie E. 
Moss, Katherine A. 
Nichols, Helen 
Nichols, Lois A. 
Norcross, Esther C. 
Ober, Reta P. 
Ordway, Mildred A. 
Overholser. Helen 
Palmer, Carita L. 
Palmer, Hazel L. 
Peterson, Edna B. 
Pike, Helen M. 
Post, Elsie M. 
Powell, Margaret B. 
Ranger, Puth M. 
Ray, Pauline B. 
Raymond, Dorothy 
Reagan, Bernice H. 
Redmond Dorothy H. 
Rice, Carol M. 
Rich, Lydia 
Rich, Mary G. 
Richards, Elizabeth G. 
Rideout, Juliette R. 
Roberts, Esther L. 
Rogers, Lenette M. 
Rosenberg Frances D. 
Saunders, Helen M. 
Saxton, Marie J. 
Shaw, Gertrude E. C. 
Seymour, Beatrice H. 
Sheldon, Madeline 
Shepherd, Jessie C. 
Skinner, Eugenia R. 
Smith, Dorothy B. 
Solof, Dora P. 
Stafford, Florence C. 
Stanley, Marion M. 
Stephan, Helen A. 
Stewart, Dorothy J. 
Stiles, Elizabeth 
Straight, Ruth E. 
Strain, Mildred A. 
Straker, Mabel E. 
Stronach, Annie E.' 
Sweet, Alma E. 
Sydeman, Stella M. 
Taylor, Mary Louise 
Taylor, Ruth G. 
Tillinghast, Helen 
Tredway, Grace 
Trice, Margaret L. 
Ufford, Margaret E. 
Wallach, Madeline 



Evanston, 111. 
Lawrence, Mass. 
Danville, 111. 
Reading, Pa. 
Glen Park, N. Y. 
Watertown, N. Y. 
Joliet, 111. 
Corning, N. Y. 
Gardiner, Me. 
Peoria, 111. 
Sharon, Pa. 
Barton. Vt. 
Enosburg Falls, Vt. 
Columbus, O. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Oneonta, N. Y. 
Melrose, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Greenfield, Mass. 
East Arlington, Vt. 
Old Town, Me. 
Beverly, Mass. 
Orleans, Vt. 
Claremont, Calif. 
McLean, 111. 
Oneonta, N. Y. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Gloucester, Mass. 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Fort Worth, Tex. 
Providence, R. I. 
Somerville, Mass. 
Brookline, Mass. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Madison, N. J. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Keokuk, Iowa 
Keokuk, Iowa 
Fort Fairfield, Me. 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
So. Carver, Mass. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Oneonta, N. Y. 
London, England. 
Winsted, Conn. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Middletown, Dela. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
White River, June, Vt. 
Huntington, W. Va. 
Corapolis, Pa. 
New Britain. Conn. 
Kingston. N. Y. 
Toledo, O. 
Gardner, Mass. 
Hastings, Nebr. 
Easthampton, Mass. 
Attleboro, Mass. 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
Milford, Mass. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 
Wakefield, Mass. 
Central Village, Conn. 
Columbus, O. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Spokane, Wash. 
New York City 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



Warren, Ruth S. 
Welch. Blanche C. 
Whipple, Dale M. 
Whiting, Charlotte A. 
Williams, Elizabeth 
Willis. Vera 
Winslow, Evelyn 
Winslow, Ruth C. 
Woolf, Leslie 



Worcester, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 
Orleans, Vt. 
South Sudbury, Mass. 
Salem, Mass. 
Gorham, N. H. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Nashua, N. H. 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 



DAY STUDENTS 



Beaver. Edna 
Clark, Ann 
Cutter, Helen M. 
Oilman, Marjorie D. 
Nicksrson, Myrle I 
Sands, Mildred 



Norwood. Mass. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
Auburndale. Mass. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Brookline, Mass. 
Newton Centre, Mass. 



Wright. Josephine E. Auburndale, Mass. 



Just after dinner, Wednesday night, Sept- 
ember 29, when all of the girls were collected 
in the halls, everyone was startled by the 
pleasant ( ?) sound of our rising gong. At the 
same time came a rush from 70 and a passage 
was easily made when fifty Seniors ran out 
toward the Crows Nest. As soon as all had 
managed to get up there, the class gave their 
yell. Then to the tune of "Boola Yale" 
they sang the following song: 

Goodness, gracious, what's that cheering? 
'Tis the Seniors 1916 
They have something now to tell you 
Listen, people, here's some news. 

Everyone was delighted to hear the follow- 
ing list given as the officers of the 1916 class. 
President, Frances M. Harris; Vice Presi- 
dent, Marian Beach; Secretary, Naomi Brad- 
ley; Treasurer, Mabel E. Straker; and Cheer 
Leader, Mildred P. Cloake. 

Everybody then joined in on the Alma 
Mater which the Seniors started. 



The first meeting of the Christian Endeavor 
Society on September the twenty-seventh 
was led by Miss Hager, Secretary of the Stu- 
dent Volunteer Movement. She gave an 
inspiring and broadening talk about her work 
among the schools and colleges of the United 
States. The Volunteer Movement has 
developed through the desire of the students 
to help our less fortunate brothers and sis- 
ters across the seas. A Student Volunteer 



pledges himself to go, if possible, to some for- 
eign land as a missionary, teacher or doctor. 

Miss Potter led Christian Endeavor on Oct- 
ober fifth and gave us one of her very helpful 
talks on the topic, "Get the Habit." She 
told the girls that if they would only get the 
habit of spending a few minutes each day 
with God, it would be to send them off on 
their day's work brighter and happier. 

The first Vesper Service of the new year 
was led by Rev. A. J. Muste, speaker on 
Baccalaureate Sunday of the 1915 Commence- 
ment. He gave us a very earnest and strong 
talk on "Ideals." 

Rev. McClure of the Episcopal Church of 
West Newton led the Vesper Service on 
October third. He took as the basis for his 
talk the story of the Golden Calf and showed 
us how people were coming more and more to 
worship literature, art and nature for their 
sakes alone, instead of serving God in Nature, 
literature and art and worshipping Him 
through them. 




^^ 




DlTORLfl 




We, the old girls, heartily welcome the new 
girls, one and all, to our beloved Lasell. 
We hope that already we have made you feel 
so much at home that you have seen our spirit 
here. You have entered a wonderful school 
for which we all want to work this year as 
hard as we possibly can. Let's raise its stan- 
dard to the highest notch. "Give to Lasell 
the best you have and the best will come back 
to you." The class spirit here is strong. En- 
ter into it. Take hold and work with life 
and enjoyment. You will realize more and 
more as the year goes by what fun you can 
have at Lasell both in work and play. 

The Seniors wish again to extend the in- 
vitation to each girl to come over to Carpenter 
and Gardner whenever she can. They are 
holding open house all of the time. 

We hope that this year of 1915-1916 will be 
one, long remembered for its various oppor- 
tunities and enjoyment. 



All of you girls here at school heard of 
the Lasell Leaves, when the purpose of the 
magazine was explained in chapel; but we 
wish to remind you again of some of the 
things all of you girls can do for it, 

The Leaves is the mouth piece of our dear 
Lasell. We, therefore, wish it to speak clearly, 
truthfully, and well for all the school. Don't 
make or even allow the few girls, who have 



charge now, to do all of the work. Let us 
make the paper representative of every class 
and of group of girls. 

There are four to five positions left open on 
the staff now which we greatly desire 
to fill with girls who are not Seniors in 
order that there may be some experienced 
persons to leave the paper with next Spring. 

There are a great many things that all of 
you girls can do to help besides subscribing 
which we hope you have done by now. Some 
of these things are sending in stories, and 
poems, and writing up trips or parties when 
the local editors ask you to do it. We hear 
some saying right away, "Oh, I can't write a 
thing, I never could." Well, then there are 
still other things to be done. You can write 
down any funny things overheard in the halls 
or classroom and hand them in. Word comes 
to us that you want more jokes ; that you want 
a joke column. It is up to you girls then to 
hand in those that you hear. Then we are 
anxious to have our magazine made interest- 
ing by pictures. Take some when you are 
out walking and whenever you go on any trip 
and then give copies to someone on the staff. 

If all of the girls would contribute material, 
and you can do it, we could publish a maga- 
zine which it would be hard to excel and which 
we would not be ashamed to show to our 
most exacting critics. 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



All of the old girls were saddened by the 
news of the death of our beloved nurse, Miss 
Nutt. We sadly miss her gracious presence, 
her cheery greetings and her kind devotion 
to our needs. 

We wish here to extend our deepest sym- 
pathy to her family in whose sorrow we in a 
measure share. 



Any new venture is begun with a bit of 
doubt as to its success. This is the first year 
that Lasell has found a place for a resident 
family of horses. The hiring from near by 
stables or the rather long trips to riding ac- 
ademies is past. Whenever the desire comes 
and studies do not interfere a ride through the 
lovely shaded paths may be enjoyed by 
those whose parents are willing. 

Instruction is offered to those who have 
never ridden, five lessons free of charge, and 
additional ones for a small sum. It is our 
plan that at the end of the five lessons each girl 
will know the rudiments so that she may en- 
joy the rides and have sufficient knowledge 
so that she can readily acquire the graces 
that should come as the result of practiced 
horsemanship. "Safety First" is our chief 
slogan and we take every precaution possible. 
Good horsemanship consists, not in seeing 
how fast a horse can gallop and the rider still 
stay on but in managing the animal deftly 
and keeping a good seat no matter what the 
gait. 

The autumn and spring months should 
bring especial pleasure. Nothing could be more 
lovely than the coloring in the woods just 
now unless it will be the fresh green of spring 
and the arrival of our feathered friends. 
One bridle path leads through an unusually 
delightful stretch of woods, full of enticing 
byways and luring "Runaway Roads." 

Best of all perhaps, for those who already 
love animals anyway, is the fact that new 
friends are being made. When we under- 
stand the rare intelligence, the real affection 



that horses can and do show, and all their 
interesting little tricks, we are glad to add 
them to our list of real companions. 

Cooperation is necessary for the success of 
anything, so we ask that you all do what is 
in your power to help us live up to our motto, 
"Safety First." Thus our memories will all 
be of pleasant happy times and we will know 
that this new pleasure-giving sport is a 
success. 

Come out some morning when the sun is 
just lighting up the tops of these New Eng- 
land hills and see if the sound of the horses 
hoofs and the creak of saddle leather isn't 
all that the poets say it is. 



"There is ever a song somewhere, my dear. 
In the midnight black or the midday blue; 
The robin pipes when the sun is here 
And the cricket chirrups the whole night through 
The buds my blow and the fruit my grow, 
And the autumn leaves drop crisp and sear; 
But whether the sun, or the rain, or the snow 
There is ever a song somewhere, my dear, 
There is ever a song somewhere." 

James Whitcomb Riley. 







Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Goodman of Hart- 
ford, Conn., announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Gladys Goodman, to Francis 
Edward Stern of New York. 
L |From Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wallace Powers 
comes the announcement of the engagement 
of their daughter Doris Hazel, to Mr. Philip 
W. Thomas. 

Mrs. Joseph MacDonald announces the en- 
gagement of her daughter, Clara, '14, to Mr. 
E. M. Dealey. 

The engagement of Miss Myrtle Alvina 
Brix, '15, to Mr. Henry Buehner, of Port- 
land, Oregon has just been received. 

The following unusually long list of happy 
marriages would indicate that Cupid has 
been working successfully during the Lasell 
vacation days. 

On Tuesday, June 8, occurred the marriage 
of Rosalie Seinsheimer, '12, to Mr. Norvin 
J. Heldman at Cincinnati, O. 

June 13, Dorothy Canfield, '14, became 
Mrs. Raymond Minshal Cheseldine at Bever- 
ly Hills, California. Mr. and Mrs. Cheseldine 
are at home in London, O. 

Clara Dorothy Prince and Mr. Donald 
Horace Dickerman were married on Satur- 
day, June 19, at Bedford, Mass. 

On the nineteenth of June, Mildred Esther 



Koch, '13, became Mrs. Harold R. Kauf- 
mann at Cincinnati, O. 

Mrs. Edgar A. Reincke announces the 
marriage of her daughter, Lillie, to 
Mr. Herman August Kley, on Saturday, 
June 19, at Bolton Landing on Lake George, 
New York. 

On Wednesday, July 28, occurred the 
marriage of Elizabeth Harriet Linn, '13, to 
Mr. Charles Hebard Manness at Chautauqua, 
N. Y. Mr. and Mrs. Manness' address is 
Pequaming, Mich. 

Mildred Grace Westervelt, '13, and Mr. 
Herbert David Warner were married on 
Saturday, July 17, at South Bend, Ind. Mr. 
and Mrs. Warner are at home at 320 West 
Navarre St., South Bend, Ind. 

The wedding of Alice Mildred Fuller to 
Mr. Walter Channing Dunbar occurred on 
Wednesday, July 21, at Brockton, Mass. 

On the twenty-fifth of August, Mary Eliza- 
beth Van Arsdale became Mrs. Edward Mey- 
er Pitkin at Greencastle, Ind. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pitkin are at home in Greencastle, Ind. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Herbert Beach an- 
nounce the marriage of their daughter, Eliza- 
beth Sherwood, '15, to Mr. Ralph Winfred 
Bierer, on Wednesday, September 22, at 
Binghamton, N. Y. 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



On Saturday, September 25, occurred the 
marriage of Madelene Taws Halberstadt to 
Mr. Herbert D. Kynor. After November 
first, Mr. and Mrs. Kynor will be at home at 
622 Ouincy Ave., Scranton, Pa. 

The marriage of Olive Ford Bates, '10, to 
Mr. George C. Dumas occurred on Wed- 
nesday, September 1, at Hanover, Mass. 

September 11, Grace Miriam Alexander, '12, 
became Mrs. Spencer Martin Van Deusen at 
Springfield, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Van Deusen 
will be at home in December at Westfield, 
Mass. 

Lasell joins with a host of friends in hearty 
congratulations to these fair brides and 
favored grooms. 



During the vacation days a dear company 
of little ones have come to gladden the homes 
of "old Lasell girls." On July 10, 1915, Oliver 
Fuller Eldridge was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert G. Eldridge (Carrie A. Fuller) ; on 
July 13, Philip John Whiteway, Jr., was 
welcomed at the home of Mr. and Mrs. P. J. 
Whiteway (Dorothy Payne, '14) ; on July 19, 
Henrietta Elizabeth Schmidt was born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Becker Schmidt (Julia 
Potter, '06) ; on July 20, Devereux Gerrard 
Hoyt was born to Mr. and Mrs. Harry O. 
Hoyt (Florence Stark); on July 20, little 
daughter, Gertrude Marston Arey came to the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Arey (Ruth 
Marston, '06) ; on August 20, Virginia Leahy 
came to gladden the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Lawrence Leahy (Fern Dixon, '07) : 
on September 6, Samuel Webb Tilton was 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Elliott Til- 
ton (Glenna Webb) and Mr and Mrs. F. A. 
King (Marion MacArthur, '12) welcomed 
little Eleanor MacArthur King, on August 22. 

Lasell sends a loving welcome to each dear 
little "new comer." 

Lasell receives with open arms her latest 
new girl, wee Priscilla Winslow, Born Oct. 
8. Heartiest congratulations to our Prin- 
cipal and Mrs. Winslow, also this dear little 
daughter. 



Among the new members of the Faculty 
are Miss Nelson, who succeeds Miss Riker as 
assistant in Household Economics and Lela 
H. Goodall, '08 is assisting in the Mthematics 
Department, Jean McKay, another of our 
best "old girls" who comes back as instructor 
in horse back riding. Senora Belen Q. Arte- 
sani is the new instructor in Spanish and has 
already two enthusiastic classes. 

We are delighted to receive this word from 
Mr. John Taft, father of our Ethel, '08, who 
writes, "Our daughter, Ethel, has been at 
Lima, Ohio, in the Public Library, as assis- 
tant librarian for the past two years. She is 
doing very well there and if her health 
allows, she expects to take a year's course in 
special work in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Jeanette Ritter Heller sends a greeting to 
Lasell telling us that her husband will start 
in September for a three year's course in 
Theological Seminary. She speaks of the 
serious illness of her little daughter, Mary 
Louise but hopes some day she will be strong 
and well and a Lasell girl. 

Julia Funkhouser Mellin exclaims, "My! 
Wouldn't I just love to see all of my old friends 
again. I do wish they could see my three 
sturdy boys and baby girl," and indeed 
friends at Lasell would be glad to see you, 
Julia. Come "home" when you can. 

Phoebe Hallock, Ruth Hall, Florence Skin- 
ner and Susan Tiffany, '15, were the guests of 
Ruth Tuthill in the early summer. It goes 
without saying that they had a delightful 
reunion and Lasell came in for her share of 
pleasant reminiscences. 

Bernadine J. Monaghan gives Jean Flem- 
ing Williams address as 1538 Saginaw St., 
Salem, Ore., and also adds the interesting 
information that Jean has three children, 
two boys and a girl. Am glad to have word 
from and about these dear "old girls." 

Mabel Sawyer Rogers, '95 sends the glad 
information that Mabel Lutes, '95, is gradu- 
ally working her way nearer Lasell. This 
winter she will teach in Springfield, Mass. 
Mabel also adds the interesting word that on 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



May 14 there came to her home a little son, 
Charles Sawyer Rogers. Our congratula- 
tions to parents and small boy. 

Katherine Fassett (Mrs. John Chandler) 
whose address is Meadowbrook Farm, Ster- 
ling Junction, Mass. is a friend of our new 
girl, Margaret E. Ufford?. These girls were 
friends in Spokane, Washington. 

Through the kindness of Ida R. Bushnell 
we learn that Anne Bushnell Simpson, '88, 
is in Pensacola, Florida and that she has since 
her marriage been blessed with two sons. Ida 
was glad to hear that Lulie Hogg, '88, is now 
a near neighbor of Lasell's and speaks with 
appreciation of her sister Julia, '94, who was 
at one time Ida's roommate in the old school 
home. Ida's permanent address is 265 
Saint Paul Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Bernice Eldridge is this year a student at 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, School for Nurses, 
Baltinor^, Md. We wish her success in her 
new wo'k. 

Agnes Wylie West, '05, called at her school- 
home this summer and how glad we were to 
welcome her. In a note to Dr. and Mrs. 
Winslow acknowledging the receipt of the 
baby book, she writes," "It is a sweet re- 
minder of Lasell. Our two boys keep me 
very busy, but they are the greatest joy in 
the world. Best wishes to you all at Lasell. 
I shall never forget how happy were my years 
there." 

Marjorie Carleton Stewart writes a line in- 
troducing to Lasell three new girls, Jeanette 
Busey, Helen Freeman and Josephine Burt. 
Marjorie's husband is on the Faculty of the 
State University of Illinois. 

Although Mrs. Ordway is not a Lasell girl 
we feel, on account of Mr. Ordway 's associa- 
tion with our school, that we must claim wee 
Barbara born August 12, as a Lasell girl. 
Lasell's heartiest congratulations to the 
parents and little daughter. 

Among the daughters of "old Lasell girls" 
enrolled in our school this year are Judith 
Burbank, daughter of Harriet Mabel Lord and 



Bettina Hovey, daughter of Janie Field Ed- 
gerton. Twice welcome are the sisters of 
our "old girls" Virginia Moore sister of 
Carolyn Moore, T4, Helen Lesh, sister of 
Charlotte Lesh, '12. 

While in Chicago we learned that Frances 
Leavitt Patterson, '03 died in the early 
Spring very suddenly leaving a little two 
weeks old son. Her husband was on the 
hospital staff of Saint Luke's Hospital in 
Chicago. Lasell mourns the untimely death 
of this graduate and extends her sympathy 
to the bereaved family. 

One of the saddest words which came to 
Lasell during the summer was the account of 
the sudden death of Dorothy Hartshorn's, '14, 
little brother who was killed in an automobile 
accident September 15. Our tenderest sym- 
pathy to Dorothy and her family. 

Margaret Henning had a delightful trip 
over the Canadian Rockies and a fine time 
in California. She was disappointed in not 
meeting Lasell friends. 

Susan Tiffany, '15 and President Nellie 
Woodward, '15, with Mrs. Tiffany as chape- 
ron have just started on their journey to the 
golden West. We understand they go by 
automobile to Chicago and from there by 
rail to California. This ideal journey will 
extend over many months. Our best wishes 
go with these friends. 

Sophie Barrett, '14, sent a fascinating card 
from Denver Mountain Park, Colorado, 
where she and her family have been spending 
the summer. She writes with enthusiasm 
of her experiences in Colorado. 

Eleanor E. Smith was a guest this summer of 
Wilhelmina Joscelyn Swett, '13, at Newport, 
Vt. Eleanor declares "Willa" an excellent 
housekeeper and ideal hostess. In her own 
words she writes, "We had quite a reunion of 
the old Lasell girls one evening Marion New- 
land sang at the Newport Yacht Club House 
so Helen Foster, Lucille Joscelyn and myself 
went down to hear her. She sang well and 
we were proud of her. One day we went to 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



Lyndonville to attend the Methodist Camp 
Meeting. Mr. Joscelyn preached in the 
morning and afternoon and directly after 
dinner we attended the children's meeting 
of which Lucille Joscelyn had charge. She 
enjoyed her work and how the children did 
love her." 

Since school opened our Preceptress re- 
ceived a kind message from Lael Irvine des- 
scribing a wonderful journey through the 
great West which she declares was verv edu- 
cational and inspiring." She closed her 
message with — "Nothing would give me 
greater pleasure than to be with you again 
and I shall always cherish the memory of 
my one happy year at Lasell." 

Forward seems to be the watchword for 
Florence Evans, '15. In her God-speed 
message to Lasell for 1915 and 1916 she 
writes, "I have been so Lasell homesick this 
last week that I want right now to engage 
places for Ethel Murray, Doris Waller and 
myself for Commencement week. Have 
had a splendid summer this year. Am going 
over to the University twice a week for the 
course in Modern Drama and the Gymnasium 
work." She closed by wishing the very best 
year for her dear Alma Mater. 

Miss Potter was delighted with AmyTuthill 
Ruth's sister, (who was one of the California 
party.) and her friend and travelling com- 
panion Gladys Wright. They are planning to 
enter Lasell next fall and will receive cor- 
dial welcome. 

In a pleasant letter to Maude Hayden, 
Rose Hoefflin writes from her Iowa home. "I 
am glad I had one year of Lasell life — a year 
never to be forgotten. My heartiest wishes 
for a happy and successful year. God bless 
the class of 1916." 

Mabelle Whitney, '03, was "on hand" at 
the opening of school and we greatly appre- 
ciate her unfailing kindness in coming to us 
each fall to help welcome the new girls. 

Sophie Wendt and Mabel Jones, '14, were 
also among our earliest and most welcome 
callers. 



Lurella Krentlerand Lucy L.Terry were East 
attending the wedding of Grace Alexander, 
'12 and took time to visit Lasell. We greatly 
appreciate their coming and thank them for 
their loyalty to the old school home. 

Hazel Carey Adam, '05, was a recent guest 
of Helen Carter Marcy, '06 and dropped in 
upon us unexpectedly. Hazel looks just 
about as young as on the day of her gradua- 
tion but tells us that her two daughters, the 
oldest eight years old, are attending school. 
We have to believe her, as to dates and ages, 
but find it difficult! 

Carolyn Moore, '14, came with her sister 
at the opening of school. We wish we could 
have kept her for a post graduate course, but 
thank her for leaving such a fine substitute. 

Ida Jones, '05, came out of her way to 
spend a night in Auburndale and visit Lasell. 
We have not quite forgiven her for treating 
us so formally, in other words putting up at 
the Inn instead of coming right "home." 
However, we were more than glad to catch 
even a brief glimpse of this dear "old girl." 

Emily Shift Dunn came back to Auburn- 
dale for eight weeks this summer in order to 
be with Martha Ransom and wa^> kind enough 
occasionally to visit Lasell. 

Miss Anna Raymond, instructor in Latin 
at Lasell for the past two years is now en- 
joying her position in Beaver College, Beaver, 
Pa. Lasell best wishes follow her. 

We are all glad to welcome back Miss 
Irwin who will resume her work as in- 
structor in Latin. 

During the opening days of the school 
year we were gladdened by an occasional 
glimpse of Mrs. Charles C. Bragdon, wife of 
our Principal Emeritus. Mrs. Bragdon 
and Miss Ransom have recently started for 
California but will stop en route in Williams- 
port, Pa., where they will be the guests of 
Sarah Ransom Hazelet. 

In her cordial message to Doctor Winslow, 
Callie Le Seure, '03, reports a delightful 
summer spent in New England in company 
with her father and mother. She stopped in 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



Hartford long enough to have a pleasant 
visit with Bertha Hayden King, '03, and her 
two beautiful children. 

Mabel Case Viot, '94, was fortunate in 
meeting a number of Lasell folk during her 
Western trip. She tells of a very pleasant 
call from "Dr. Bragdon and Belle" in Los 
Angeles. In Sand Lake, Michigan, she spent 
two days with her old Lasell roommate, 
Mollie Taylor Rathbun and "saw five of her 
six children"-— one of the little group was 
away camping. In Seattle, Mabel was 
fortunate in meeting again June Hoyt 
Moore. In Portland she writes, "we had 
less than twenty-four hours but managed to 
see Carrie Steel Ewing, '95, who motored 
around the boulevards with us and took us 
to see her sister Josephine who was also at 
Lasell "in my day." Through Dr. Winslow's 
courtesy the Secretary of the Portland Lasell 
Club was informed of my coming and very 
graciously offered to serve me, but un- 
fortunately I did not receive her note until I 
reached San Francisco." 

To Dr. and Mrs. Winslow in her note ac- 
knowledging the receipt of the Lasell Baby 
Book, Dorothy Payne Whiteway, '14, refers 
to her fine big boy as one of the best babies 
in the world." 

Constance Davis is Secretary of the Lasell 
Portland, Oregon Club and reports a won- 
derfully successful "getting together" of old 
"old Lasell girls" at their first meeting. 
Mrs. Clara Steel Ewing, '95, was 
elected President and Marjorie Read business 
manager." One of the most hospitable and 
unique decisions of this young club Constance 
expresses in the following words: "We are 
to be always ready to entertain any who may 
come to Portland from Lasell, especially the 
teachers. We will deem it a favor if you, 
knowing of any teacher passing thru Port- 
land will tell them of our club and give them 
our President's or Secretary's address." She 
speaks of Lillian Buehner Ladd's little daugh- 
ter, now three months old. We shall await 
with interest the name of this little Oregon 
girl. The following Lasell girls were present: 



Caroline Steel Ewing, '95, Eila Patterson 
Rogers, '05, Margarita Beuhner Sailor, '06, 
Meta Beuhner Noble, '06, Marie Cogswell 
Gelinsky, '06, Josephine Steel (Mrs. Charles 
Warrens), Clara Lewis (Mrs. S. F. Owen), 
Helen B. Danforth (Mrs. C. B. Baker), Helen 
N. Brooks (Mrs. Herbert Bradley, Marjorie 
Read, Rachel Chambers, Nettie Roulston, 
Lillian Buehner Ladd, Lucile L. Lothrop (Mrs. 
H. D. Haley) . 

Many Lasell girls of recent day. will 
remember Helen Greene, Doctor Winslow's 
secretary, and will be interested to learn of 
her happy marriage which occurred on Wed- 
nesday, September 15, to Mr. Percy Brooks 
Hussey at Loudon, N. H. Mr. Hussey is 
District Supervisor of the New England Tele- 
phone Company. 

Ida R. Laubenstein, '15, reports a very en- 
joyable summer. She writes, "Martha 
Schumann was with me during the month of 
July and Sara Lane during August." She 
closed by wishing the school the very best 
success during the coming year. 

Olive Bates Dumas, '10, writes with en- 
thusiasm from her new home and promises 
later a snap shot of her home and husband. 

The engagement of Anne F. Merrill, '12, to 
Edward W. David of Germantown, Pa., was 
announced on Oct. 18. 



LASELL GIRLS— WEST 

Our Westward-Ho trip was interrupted, 
but as long as it lasted it took us through a 
zone rich in friendly Lasell girls. 

While in Chicago enroute to and from Minn- 
eapolis we tried to get in touch with Mary and 
Dora Goodwillie, but were disappointed, for 
both tim.es they were "down East." Many of 
the other Chicago "old girls" were a-field. 
However, to her surprise and our delight 
we located Ruth Ketcham, '13, at study in the 
"Gregg School." 

Julia Potter Schmidt, '06, was our Chicago 
hostess. Were it not a case of being "in the 
family" we would like to say some very nice 
things about Julia, her husband, and precious 
baby daughter. 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



We frequently visited Lillie Potter in the 
Presbyterian Hospital, where she was con- 
valescing from a serious operation, and prov- 
ing herself a very brave and patient invalid. 

In Evanston we were the guests of Mabel, 
Ida and Florence Jones. Margaret was tem- 
porarily with the "down East" folks. That 
was a never to be forgotten day spent in their 
ideal home, made so by the presence of Mr. 
and Mrs. Jones as well as the clear girls. 

It was vacation time for the rest of us, but 
Frances Bragdon, '05, was busy serving as 
Private Secretary to one of the heads of the 
Northwestern University. 

While at Frances' home her cousin, Rebec- 
ca Shepherd, dropped in and we had a friendly 
visit. We had not met since "before the War" 
which means the summer of 1914 when we 
were together in Venice. 

Leaving the girls we crossed the street to the 
Bragdon homestead where we found Mrs. 
Shepherd with whom we enjoyed a real Lasell 
chat. Part of the time was spent in her de- 
lightful old garden with its attractive new 
pergola. 

Our July journey between Chicago and 
Minneapolis was made comfortable in steam 
heated cars, just think of that! 

Shortly after reaching this twin city, we 
had a chance meeting with Mary Taylor, and 
her mother. Later we called at Mary's home 
which overlooks lovely Lake Calhoun and 
the same day tried to find Marguerite Owen, 
but were disappointed. We heard some very 
nice things about Mary's work in the State 
University. 

Under the guidance of Mary Potter Mc- 
Conn, '05, the President of the Minnesota 
Lasell Club, we called at the hom.es of many 
"old girls." 

We found Eleanor Warner Salisbury living 
in a very attractive home not far from Lake 
of the Isles. Her two dear baby boys sort of 
"took to us" at once and thereupon promptly 
preempted a warm corner in our hearts. 
Eleanor is a model housekeeper as well as 
mother. 



Dorothy Chaffee Stroud seems not a day 
older than when student at Lasell. Her little 
daughter is a beauty and looks like her mother! 
We hope this is satisfactory to Mr. Stroud whom 
we were sorry not to meet. 

There is no more loyal or enthusiastic 
Lasell girls in Minneapolis or any where else, 
than Bertha Lillibridge Merrill. Although 
not of our day, my niece and I both wanted 
to claim her. We shall not soon forget her 
dear children, two girls and a boy; her de- 
served tributes to Miss Carpenter and Dr. 
Bragdon and the pleasant picture of her as we 
saw her in the beautiful Minneapolis home. 

We are moved to call Mrs. Lucy Rogers 
Gove "the first lady" of the Minneapolis 
Lasell group. She was graduated from 
Lasell in 1860. Intensely interesting were 
her stories of Lasell in olden times and also 
of the "village of Minneaplis" as she found 
it fifty-five years ago. 

Myra Schofield Magnuson is a near and 
friendly neighbor of Mrs. Gove. Myra— 
too, introduced us to a shy winsome little 
lassie, her daughter, we were sorry to miss 
the rest of the family. 

Minnie Trimble is one of the busiest and 
happiest women in Minneapolis. She is now 
Executive Secretary of the Minnesota Wo- 
man's Suffrage League. 

Katherine Wheeler, '04, Marion Joslin, '12, 
and Edith Waller, Bermund '15, were away, so 
toour regret were Mrs. Washington Yale (May 
Emery, '98,) and the Christensen sisters. 

We found dear Mrs. Burnett, Alleda, and 
their guest, Hannah Bingaman, '14, at home. 
We had a typical Lasell conversation. In 
the midst of our visit a stalwart attractive 
young man appeared whom A. declared was 
"a cousin." This was no doubt true as far 
as she was concerned. We sensed the situa- 
tion and made a quick departure in favor of 
"the cousin." 

Elizabeth House McMillan came over to 
Minneapolis one day and lunched with us. 
We told her Lasell news and she in turn 
answered a lot of questions relative to her 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



happy family. We were especially interested 
in the newest member, a dear little daughter. 

Barbara :and Nell Jones' sister, Mrs. Allan 
D. Albert is a resident of Minneapolis. 
We can't claim her as a real Lasell girl 
but have adopted her. Her husband, Mr. 
Albert is called "the most eloquent speaker in 
the twin cities." We were favored in listen- 
ing to some of his inspiring messages. 

Dear Minnesota girls, Lasell is content to 
leave her reputation in your safe hands. 
Come back to the school home as often as 
possible. L. R. P. 



TOO CLEVER! 

After having been promised that drinking 
water was just ahead, and having padlled for 
fifteen minutes, Mabel dropped this remark: 
"I guess it'll be Winter before the Spring." 



JOKES 



"CAN YOU IMAGINE" 

All "95" 's on your report card. 

"Sister" Lawton and Phyllis Lang in last 
year's styles. 

Carol Rice with curly hair. 

"Sis" Frankel with long dresses on. 

Katherine Dearborn "on restriction." 

Greater contrast than Edith Babcock's 
stockings and ties. 

Mervelle Gratz with the same dress on 
two days running. 

Miss Nelson in a bad humor. 

A dignified Senior. 

A basket ball score like this: Lasell, 15 — 
Radcliffe, 7. 

Silence in 70. 

A full mail box. 

No assignment in Senior Bible. 



Senior: "When I graduate, I shall step into 
a position of $20,000 per." 
Freshman: — "Per what?" 
Senior: — "Perhaps." 



Tired Student: — "I guess I'll take a nap.' 
Roommate — "Where to?" 



Mid, on canoe trip. — "I guess I'll hit that 
turtle." 

Fran:— "Be sure you don't turn turtle.' 



Helen Bauman doesn't mind taking a 
chance at guessing but we hope most mem- 
bers of XIX Century History are . better 
guessers. 

Miss Rand asked how many there were in 
the Bastille when it was taken and H. B. said 
about 14,000. Really there were about 7. 

Pretty good, Helen! 



We wonder what the new girls think the 
Student Council is. 

The other day a girl asked whether the 
teacher who caught her out of her room dur- 
ing study hour would report her to the Stu- 
dent Council? 

Another asked what you did to join? 



Let us hope that after a year in our splendid 
cooking course, a girl won't ask, "Which is the 
yolk of this egg? This white part?" 



After seeing the decoration which Mervelle 
wore over her eye the other evening, we won- 
der what sort of barbarians Bancroft con- 
tains. 



Miss Dolley to New Girl : "If you wish light 
extension, you should come to me." 

New Girl: "The man has already been here 
and extended my light." 





We are glad to acknowledge the following 
June Exchanges: — 

Alpha, New Bedford H. S.; Wise Acres; 
Gale Pennant, Galesville, Wis. ; Echoes, Fort 
Lee, N. J.; The Forum, Lockport, H. S. ; The 
Monroe IT. S. Bugle Osceole, Ark. ;Grotonian, 
Groton, Mass.; Mirror, Central H. S. Birm- 
ingham, Ala.; Aegis, Beverly H. S. Mass; 
Abbott Observer, Farmington, Me. ; Jabber- 
wock, Girls' Latin School, Boston; Thyme and 
Lavendar, Drew Seminary, Carmel, N. Y. ; 
Now and Then, St. Paul Academy, Minn.; 
The World, St. Paul, Minn.; Shucis, Sche- 
nectady, N. Y.; Bon Bon, Greenfield, H. S. 
Mass.; Goldenrod, Wayne, Ind.; K. II. S. 
Record, Kingfield, Me.; Hillbilly, Somerville 
H. S. Radiator, Mass. ; Keene Kronicle, 
Keene, N. H.; Echo, Gouverneur, N. Y. ; 
Sassamon, Natick, Mass. ; Lawrence H. S. 
Bulletin, and the following September issues: 

The X-Ray, Anderson, Ind.; Artisan, 
Bridgeport, Conn; and Sharps and Flats, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The World, St. Pa'ul, Minn; — Your June 
number is one of the most interesting ex- 
changes that we have ever seen. The cover 
is very effective. The illustrations of your 
stories are of a sort seldom seen and show 
good spirit. But why not have the Exchange 



column come up to the rest of the paper, and 
enlarge it? 

The Shucis — You, also, have a very pleasing 
cover. The photographs add greatly to the 
paper's attractiveness. The story, "Pray You, 
Love, Remember," is a clever one. 

The X-Ray, Anderson, Ind. — Your paper is 
interesting and the cuts are good. Your joke 
department is very full and is a great source 
of enjoyment. 

The Purple and Gold — Don't you think that 
a few cuts combined with your photographs 
will make your paper more interesting? Also 
a few stories would help. 

Lostl — Several good cuts from department 
heads. Finder please return to the Dial, 
Brattleboro, Vermont. 

Thyme and Lavendar, Carmel, N. Y. — You 
also lack cuts. Don't you think they would 
add a great deal to your paper? 

Noiv and Then, St. Paul, Minn. — What a 
fine lot of stories you have! Your material 
is excellent, in fact, all the way through. The 
paper is good and very well printed. 

Grotonian, Groton, Mass. — Your photo- 
graphs are numerous and good but some of 
them might be printed better. "Movie 
Making and Movie Taking" is very enter- 
taining. 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



Abbott Observer — We are very glad to have 
your paper among our exchanges as it is one 
of the best. Your cuts are excellently drawn 
as well as full of spirit. 



AS THEY SEE US 

Lasell Leaves — Your paper is one of the 
best that we received. Your cover is always 
attractive, but it is unusually so this month. 
All the departments are well-written and the 
cuts, of which there are always a large num- 
ber, add a great deal of interest to the paper. 
On the whole it is a paper which is interesting 
not only to the students, but to others as 
well. — The Aegis. 

Lasell Leaves — The artistic cover design led 
us to expect much from within and we are 
pleased to say that our expectations were 
amply fulfilled. Your numerous pictures 
should add to the local interest in your paper. 
— The Echo, Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Lasell Leaves — This is an interesting and 
attractive magazine. A little more material 
of a serious character would be an improve- 
ment. — Sharps and Flats. 

Lasell Leaves — Yours is one of the best 
papers we have received this year! Your 
cover design is very attractive and your cuts 
suggestive. Your exchange editor might give 
more space to criticism. — Gale Pennant. 

Lasell Leaves — Your Easter number has its 
usual attractive appearance. The metrical 
translation of "Dido's Curse" is excellent. We 
have vainly searched your exchange column 
for a criticism of our paper. Your estimate 
of our attempts would be much appreciated. — 
Abbott Observer. 

From Auburndale, Mass., comes the Lasell 
Leaves, put out by a board of editors of young 
women. It shows a whole lot of work and 
spirit. "Only a Golf Ball," for a light story, 
is very well written. The large number of 
pictures adds life and interest to your paper. 
You certainly do have some good times in 
school. May we see your next issue? — The 
Shucis. 



Lasell Leaves — You have a very attractive 
paper. Your clever cuts and photographs 
add wonderfully to its appearance. Your 
stories are above the average that we re- 
ceive. — The For Jim. 

A paper that a stranger reads with great 
interest is Lasell Leaves, Auburndale, Mass.— 
Jabberwock. 

Lasell Leaves — All your departments are 
good. Your criticisms of exchange are ex- 
cellent. — Wise Acres. 



ECHOES FROM THE AMERICAN CLASS 

ROOM 

"In India a man out of one cask may not 
marry a woman out of another cask." 

"Benjamin Franklin is the founder of 
electricity." 

"Tennyson wrote in Memorandum." 

"Ben Johnson is one of the three highest 
mountains in Scotland." 

"The spoils system is the place where 
spoiled things and waste are kept. The 
board of health has largely taken the place 
of this." 

"Queen Elizabeth was a charming cro- 
quette." 

"A deacon is the lowest kind of Christian." 

"Lord Raleigh was the first man to see the 
invisible Armanda." 





dJb dS 



FOR ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS 

" Once a Lasell girl, always a Lasell girl ' ! 




C^> 



MEMORIAL NUMBER 



WORTH REMEMBERING 

One of her mottoes, 

It's the song ye sing 
And the smiles ye wear 




That's a-makin' 
The sun shine 
Everywhere 

— James Whitcomb Riley 



MARY L. NUTT 



One year ago Miss Nutt's greeting was 
sent to you through the Supplement, this 
month it is our sad privilege to chronicle the 
going home of our "dear Miss Nutt" who for 
twenty-four years has been not only our nurse 
but our friend. We miss her sweet face and 
cheery laugh in our midst and her passing at 
all hours of the day and night with some bit 
of refreshment in her hand for the girl who 



needed her, and the alertness with which she 
looked for some game or bit of reading to 
brighten the long hours spent in "61." In 
sickness or in health she cared for us. 

When she left Lasell a few days before 
Commencement for a much needed rest at 
the home of her sister, Mrs. Whitney, we 
little dreamed she would never return. 

Everything was done for her comfort that 



LASELL LEAVES 



27 



love and skill could suggest but the summer 
days did not bring back the expected strength 
and old-time energy and after weeks of suf- 
fering she went to her well-earned reward. 
Like Miss Carpenter whom she loved 
much she did not wish to make any trouble 
or cause any sorrow so, just before the open- 
ing of school, on September seventeenth the 
end came. The funeral services were at her 
sister's home in Newton in charge of her 
pastor, Dr. Butters, and Dr. McClure and 
on the following day she was carried to Mont- 
pelier, where in the shadow of the Vermont 
hills which were always her inspiration she 
rests. 

Among the profusion of flowers were those 
from the Lasell faculty and friends, the 
Lasell Alumnae Association and the employ- 
ees. Her room at Lasell was filled with 
flowers on the opening day of school. 

In the last days of life her mind turned 
constantly to her work of many years but 
when tempted to worry about it she would 
quote Miss Carpenter's words in the same 
situation and be content. "It isn't my work 
any more." 

Lillian M. Packard. 



A MESSAGE BY TELEGRAPH 

When Principal Charles C. Bragdon, of 
Pasadena, Cal., so long at the head of our 
seminary, heard that she had gone home, he 
telegraphed the editor of Z ion's Herald this 
expressive tribute: 

"Mary L. Nutt was a rare woman, and of 
a kind that is becoming rarer — too rare — in 
this our compromising day, for she not only 
would not compromise but she never had par- 
ley with the thought of it. Straight laced 
perhaps — some who did not know her would 
have called her so — but she was so sweet in 
her soul and body, so loving in her thinking, 
so gracious in her doings that one could 
never see the lacing for the curves. Her 
religion was no garment; it was herself. 
If ever the 'love' of the best chapter in the 



dear old book was incarnated in a human form, 
the name that form bore in its earthly 
manifestation was Mary L. Nutt. There 
was one other long ago translated to her nat- 
ural home, and of her Miss Nutt often made 
me think. I used often to look after her 
as she went about her unselfish, cheer-giving 
work at Lasell, look and wonder, and as I 
looked peace would come to me, no matter 
in what perplexing stress of circumstances 
I might be. The whole family of Lasell 
all over this land will sorrow as for the less 
of a personal friend, but will feel that she 
has gone to her rightful home. Dear Miss 
Nutt, it is not given to many to be loved and 
reverenced as you were and always will be. 
You don't need us; but how can we get along 
without you?" 



MISS POTTER WRITES IN ZION'S 
HERALD 

"Most modest of friends, and yet what a 
power for righteousness she was in our school- 
home, this dear 'Saint Mary' as our principal 
emeritus sometimes called her! Once dur- 
ing her recent days of suffering a basket of 
lovely roses was brought to her bedside and 
with it this message from two of her devoted 
Lasell girls, 'With dearest love, best of best 
friends! And may the blossoms help just a 
little.' Yes, that was it — best of friends to 
each and all of us. Nursing was only a part 
of Miss Nutt's life-work at Lasell; and who 
can rightly estimate her labor of love, her 
selfless service all through these years? This 
beautiful friend of ours, now stooping to 
bind up with skill and tenderness the wounds 
of some injured girl, and again slipping into 
the room of a discouraged pupil, and by wise 
and loving counsel and in her own blessedly 
optimistic way, heartening the discouraged 
one or moving the wrongdoer to try again, 
how easy it was for her to do for others, this 
friend who had 'learned to live richly be- 
cause she richly gave!' Some have been con- 
tent to be known as 'the friend of little chil- 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



dren.' This she was, but more than this, 
old as well as young coveted and found an 
abiding place in her great, loving heart. 
Devoting herself with rare conscientiousness 
to her professional duties, she kept in touch, 
also, with the world movements. Her 
training at Mount Holyoke College and sub- 
sequent years as a teacher, together with a 
natural love for literature, made her a valuable 
counselor to more than one puzzled pupil. 
Sorely shall we miss her gracious, loving 
presence, but we must go on courageously 
without her, if we would still be worthy of the 
friendship of this best of friends. What was 
the secret of her sweetness and strength? 
'She thought on the things that were just and 
pure and lovely and of good report, and the 
God of peace was with her.' " 



MISS WITHERBEE 

For the Faculty 
"Oh, wake her not with any tears 
From out her miracle of rest; 
She sleeps with all her perfect years 
Laid whitely at her breast. 
And so, farewell! For Love and Hope 
Shall stand as angels round her tomb; 
But, ah, to bear the silent house, 
The aching, empty room!" 

Our Comforting Sister, as one among us 
called her, who for years so long and so 
sweet with her dear presence stood ever ready 
to help, to soothe, to bind up, to heal us in 
our various bodily ills — where is she? We 
pass the door of the room for so many months 
and years made sunny with her cheery 
smile and welcoming voice, and in its ap- 
pointments so vocal of her tastes and of her 
affections, and, looking in, see not the gentle 
face of our friend, nor hear her hospitably 
urgent, "Oh, do come in!" Yet scarce it 
seems that she has gone, not to return; more 
that she has but stepped over to one of the' 
cottages to lend her sympathetic aid to some 
one of the girls who needs her helpful minis- 
tries; or, possibly, has slipped into Miss 
Potter's room a moment for a wee dish of 
gossip or other friendly chat; or, maybe, has 
gone for another taste of home joys to New- 



ton, to see her dearly loved sister there. Only 
the swift-foot months can teach us that we 
shall see her no more in her accustomed place 
among us. The precious fragrance of her 
beloved presence is all about us. Surely she 
has had a royal welcome to her Father's 
House, for which her quiet, consistent, loving, 
and devoted life has for so long been preparing 
her. And so she has gone from us, love- 
enfolded every step of the way, even down 
into the Shadowy Vale, where but for His 
presence each must walk alone. We know 
she did not fear the journey, and are com- 
forted. We do not need to cast up the 
account of her dear qualities and perfections; 
we know them too well. Other hands may 
do her work, but none can take her place 
with us; she will abide, enshrined in our 
hearts forever. 

From her favorite Calendar 

THE NURSE 

You lay your hand on my aching brow, 
Softly so! And the pain grows still, 
The moisture clings to your soothing palm. 
And I sleep because you will. 

1 forget you are here? Tis the darkness hides, 
You are always here and my needs you know, 
You tide me over the long, long nights, 
To the shores of the morning glow. 

So God's hand touches the aching soul, 
Softly, so! And the pain grows still, 
All griefs and woe from the soul He draws, 
And we rest because He wills. 

We forget, and yet He is always here! 
He knows our needs and He heeds our sighs, 
No night so long, but He soothes and stills 
Till the dawn light rims the skies. 

Charles P. Cleaves. 

ADDRESS OF REV. GEO. S. BUTTERS 
AT THE FUNERAL SERVICE 

We are thinking to-day of a beautiful life 
and her memory is more precious than gold. 
No eulogy is needed and extravagant praise 
would be out of harmony with her modest 
estimate of herself and her abilities. In 
spite of her spirit of self-effacement it 
is given few women to hold such a 
place in the affection of those who] 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 



knew her. She had an attractive face, re- 
fined manners, the education and the culture 
that enabled her to do beautiful things in a 
beautiful way. 

She was trained for teaching and had the 
teacher's gift, but she will be longest remem- 
bered by her ministering service at Lasell 
Seminary. The girls respected, trusted and 
loved her and the influence of her strong 
Christian character has gone all over this 
world. She was unusually well endowed with 
tact and this gift enabled her to do what few 
are able, for she spoke with authority be- 
cause she had wisdom, prudence and unusual 
common sense back of her directions. We 
can hear the sweet cadence of her voice as 
she quietly expressed her opinion, for she 
was independent in her thinking and always 
had a reason for her strong conviction. 

It was her natural Christian faith that 
made her life so rich and so strong. She 
knew whereof she spoke and her confidence 
strengthened the faith of those who came 
under her influence. There was no narrow- 
ness or bigotry in her religion, for she knew 
the truth has many manifestations. Her 
interests were world wide and she had 
well informed herself concerning the great 
missionary enterprises of the Christian 
Church. 

She was charitable in her judgments of 
people and considerate of the feelings of her 
associates and friends. Her face revealed 
the depth of her nature and her poise and 
dignity have helped many keep the true 
equilibrium. She was a rare soul. She did 
a great work in an easy and quiet way. She 
was more anxious to do good things than to 
remember that she had done them. She was 
constantly doing good and her life plainly 
revealed that to her the greatest thing in all 
the world is goodness. i 

We are glad that we have known her, proud 
that she was our friend and know she will 
give us a joyous welcome in "that land that 
is fairer than day." 



DR. PARKHURST 

God had especially fitted her for the ideal 
service which she rendered for nearly a 
quarter of a century to the "girls" at Lasell 
Seminary. She was more than nurse to 
them; she was their best friend, comforter, 
and needed helper. She "mothered" them 
and was never content until she had rendered 
the last service possible to them. All over 
this land Lasell girls will shed tears as they 
learn she has been translated. But not for 
her, because if ever soul went home to heaven- 
ly glories, bliss, and rest, Mary Nutt did. 
Every one who knew her loved her, especially 
the principal and associate teachers at Lasell 
Seminary. Zion's Herald 



FROM HER LASELL FRIENDS 

I am so grateful that I have known her 
and loved her, oh, to have had her for a friend 
makes my heart glad, but how I shall miss 
her. The world is poorer." 

"If only all those she has helped could do as 
much for her now, how well she would be." 
A summer letter. 

"Miss Nutt is at rest and I know she is 
happy — Heaven will just be her element." 

"How I wish I could have done something 
for her in her last days. She was one of the 
dearest women I have ever known and I re- 
gret so much that she was never able to visit 
me. I always counted her as a very dear 
friend. When Mollie and I visited Lasell 
two years ago she was very sweet and lovely to 
us and seemed so well then that I cannot be- 
lieve she has gone." 

"Can you possibly imagine how disap- 
pointed I was and how grieved to know that 
you were suffering at all when I so eagerly 
looked for you yesterday morning? I 
don't believe your dear modest mind could 
dream of the great void your absence made 
in the Commencement Day pleasures and 
you might have been surprised to hear the 
hundreds of questions concerning you al- 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 



hough you must know how every Lasell girl 'To me there is something beautiful in her 

oves you Written to Miss Nutt the day going in the full vigor of her mental powers 

following last Commencement by the secretary and before she had laid off the harness She 

of the Lasell Alumnae Association. has left a void it will be hard to fill " 



HEART-FELT TRIBUTES 

Kindness of her sister, Mrs. W. L. Whitney 

To many of her friends as well as relatives 
she was "Aunt Mary" but to us she was al- 
ways "dear Miss Nutt." 

"Oh the precious legacy of her beautiful 
life that she has left to those that love her 
and who was there that did not. This is her 
Coronation Day." 

She has just written me that she has signed 
her agreement to return to Lasell for the 
twenty-fifth year and adds, "you know how 
glad I am to be wanted." Of course she was 
wanted." 

Mt. Holyoke Association of Boston. — 
"Our Association has lost a faithful member 
and we assure you of our sympathy and 
prayers." 

She was always interested in Montpelier 
Seminary which was near her home and one 
of the students of those days writes to her 
sister, "I want to tell you with what pleasure 
I look back to the days at the seminary or 
the days at church while I was there for your 
sister never failed to speak with me — always 
with a smile and a handshake that lingered 
in my day — because very few of the down- 
town people greeted the students from day-to- 
day." 

"To my mind she was a rare character." 

"Her life was her eulogy and a beautiful 
one it was in all its simplicity and sweetness 
of unselfish sacrifice. I knew I loved her but 
how much more I loved her than I knew." 

From the president of the Daughters of 
Vermont. "I have always enjoyed meeting 
her from time to time at our meetings. I 
always wanted to see her more often and to 
know her better." 

"Aunt Mary always gives such an ex- 
quisitely personal touch to her love for 
people." 



WORDS WE MISS 

"Mercy to me." 

"Est-il possible?" 

"What can I do for you?" 

"Have you your rubbers on?" 

"I'll stay with you tonight." 

"My dear, have you taken your medicine?" 

"Come in my room and I'll make you a glass 

of lemonade." 

"How can you afford it?" 

"I am thankful." 



Miss Nutt always had such an interest in 
this little one and his mother Mae Chisholm 
that we are glad to print his picture in this 
number. 



- 


. . — _~ — 




_ 




~r 














~y 




CHISHOLM BROWN WITH HIS MANCHU 
NURSE. PEKING, CHINA 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 



COMMENCEMENT, 1915 

Since the last Supplement another Com- 
mencement has come and gone. In some 
respects it was the best one we have ever had. 
The homecoming of the alumnae and old 
girls was a great feature of the week. More 
than one hundred and fifty were with us and 
a good time they certainly had. The com- 
mittee appointed from the alumnae associa- 
tion aroused enthusiasm in many ways and 
were continued with some necessary changes 
another year. The detailed report was given 
in the Lasell Leaves for June. 



THE OREGON LASELL CLUB 

This Club was formally organized in Port" 
land, Oregon, May fifteenth, at the luncheon 
held at Hotel Benson. Much credit is due 
to the youngest members, Constance Davis 
and Marjorie Read. There were several 
girls whose addresses were not secured in time 
but the list is now complete. The following 
list of officers were elected : 

President, Mrs. Caroline Steel Ewing. 

Secretary-Treasurer , Miss Constance Davis. 

Business Manager, Miss Marjorie Read. 

Everyone was very enthusiastic over the 
club. We print the names of those who were 
present. 

Caroline Steel Ewing; Josephine Steel 
Warrens; Mrs. Nellie Brooks Bradley; Mrs. 
Clara Lewis Owen; Lillian Buehner Ladd; 
Marie Cogswell Gelinski; Helen Danforth 
Baker; Margarita Buehner Sailor; Eila Pat- 
terson Rodgers; Rachael Chambers; Con- 
stance Davis; Marjorie Read; Nettie Roul- 
stone; Meta Buehner Noble. 



HERE AND THERE 

It will be of interest to some of you to know 
that according to the annual report of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Women's 
Clubs Lasell stands at the head in the giving 
of money for the hospital relief work in Paris, 
and the Auburndale Women's Club comes 
next. 



Many of our girls will find two of their 
friends in this picture. This is on the grounds 
of Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd's present home in 
Evanston, Illinois. The pergola Mr. Shep- 
herd has recently built and its picturesque- 
ness shows the same artistic skill which he so 
often showed in his days at Lasell. Their 
daughter "Bessie" is now teaching in Girton 
Academy. 




Our sympathy goes out to Emma Barnum 
Riggs, one of our girls, whose husband is the 
president of Euphrates College, Harpoot, 
Turkey. At this school the Turkish atroci- 
ties have been frightful if the daily papers are 
correct. Four of the professors have lost 
their lives and two-thirds of the children in 
the school have suffered in one way or an- 
other. 



Dr. Bragdon has prepared a printed list of 
"Lasellians on the Pacific Coast." Those of 
us who have to do with lists know the dif- 
ficulties of such an undertaking and we ap- 
preciate this work very much. It will give 
the girls on the Pacific coast a much better 
chance to know each other. 



Mabel Falley DeVona of Saint Clair, Mich. 
has recently had two articles accepted by the 
Atlantic. We shall certainly watch for them. 
Ethel Taft is now Assistant Librarian in the 
Public Library at Lima, Ohio. 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 



Etta Wolfe Whiting writes in a letter to 
Dr. Bragdon: "My husband has entered the 
United States Indian service. He was ap- 
pointed in June and we have been here (Salt 
River, Arizona) since June. The Indians on this 
reservation are the Pimas, Maricopas and the 
old Apaches we heard so much about; only 
there are only a few old ones left, one named 
"Coffee-pot" has a medal from General Grant 
for scout work. We like it very well here. 
Stanley is fine and well and will be five next 
month. There is the dearest place in my 
heart for Lasell." 



"Lasell has taught me that Busy-ness is 
Happiness." This is what Helen Benson 
writes when asking for her credentials for the 
University of Minnesota. She is wishing that 
she might spend another year at Lasell. 



Mabel Lutes is to be the supervisor of the 
Domestic Science Department in the Techni- 
cal High School at Springfield, Mass., this 
coming year. Since leaving Lasell she has 
taken her B. S. degree from Columbia Uni- 
versity, taught eight years in Memphis, Tenn. 
then returned for post-graduate work at Co- 
lumbia, taking her M. A. degree. We do not 
wonder that she says "I am crazy about my 
work." 



The popular magazine, Good Housekeeping, 
should have a double interest for Lasell girls 
for one department is conducted by Dr. Woods 
Hutchinson, the husband of Cornelia Wil- 
liams, '86, and another one by Mrs. Ida 
Cogswell Bailey Allen, the daughter of our 
Ida Cogswell Bailey. 



In an attractive pamphlet. issued at the last 
Commencement at Harvard University 
under the caption "Academic Distinctions" 
we find the name of Robert Walston Chubb. 
His thesis was a study of "The Workingman 
of Boston." He is the son of Lou Walston 
'85. How proud she would have been of 
him. 



Mr. Jerome Eddy and Mr. Charles Talbot 
sons of Lu Orrell Eddy and Eva Stiles Buchet 
called at the seminary at different times this 
summer that they might see their mothers' 
school home, of which they had heard so 
much. Mr. Eddy studied at Cambridge, 
England and Mr. Talbot had been in educa- 
tional work in the middle west. We should 
enjoy more of such calls. 



NOTICE 



The Lasell Leaves now contains more news 
about the "old girls" than ever before. The 
only way to keep in touch with Lasell is to 
subscribe to the Leaves. Send in your sub- 
scription at once. One dollar a year. Ad- 
dress all communications to the Subscription 
Manager, Lasell Leaves, Auburndale, Mass. 




LASELL LEAVES 



33 



Our Misses Clothing Section 
Appeals to College Girls 

Up-to-date, that's the word that 
best describes this part of our bus- 
iness. The buyer is in New York 
practically every week and sees 
and buys the new things. Pur- 
chasing only one or two of a 
style guarantees exclusiveness. 

Jordan Marsh Company 

BOSTON 



PLASTIC SHOES 




(BOOTS 
Styles /SHOES 

PUMPS 



To increasing numbers the words 
PLASTIC FOOTWEAR are synony- 
mous with COMFORT. Its flexibility, 
permitting free action to the muscles of 
the foot, tends to their strengthening. 

Modified Plastics for those 
not wishing the full models 

Thayer, McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



Ultra an 


d Conservative Styles that Delight 


THE 


COLLEGE CIRL 




IN 


Frocks 


Furs Accessories 


Suits 


Mill'nery of 


Coats 


Waists all kinds 


C. F 


. Hovey Company 


Summer, 


Chauncy and Boston 


Avon 


Streets Mass. 






LASELL LEAVES 




'M^w^ilm 




e) pccia it if Jla\&zK Snap 

lUe naA?c at alt timcA the chaice&t 
al patted piantd and cut JiaWctA. 
vtt^t tocatton id convenient, out 
attendants cau^tcand and uitclii- 
aent, and qiw p/iiceA ate madetate. 

IA C^ oil cite a 



CCQUU 



c/Laua nian- <3 a^ncu La. 
^9 Jxemont c)t. ? JjoAtan 

Lit tlie JiaiK e'tteet CKuxcn. 

3^£ 3Caumaai:et 23<l 1 at 2342 



*■ 



SL. 



^t 



LASELL LEAVES 

LASELL STUDENTS 



35 



are cordially invited to visit the new 

Delicatessen Store 

Commonwealth Avenue and Lexington St. 

Here you will find the choicest home-made 
akes and candies, sandwiches, ice cream 
ind other delicacies. 



CAPODANNO & ALBANO 



Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco. 



331 AUBURN ST., 



AUBURNDALE, MASS 



Tel. Con. 1275 N. W. 



#reetmgsi to Hasiell ^tubentsi 
0lh anb Mt\a 

anb a corbial inbitation to mafee our sfjop pour 
fjeabciuarters anb meeting place tofjen in 
positon. 

§^ou toill finb our location central anb our 
attenbants courteous. 

^ousf)ton=#ornep Co. 

Jflorigts 
$arfe Street Cfjuufj 119 Fremont Street, $otfton 



You and your friends are welcome 
to the 

WELLESLEY INN 

Steak and Chicken Dinners 

A SPECIALTY 

Automobile and week-end parties Accommodated 
Tel. Wellesley 21050 



HAYDEN 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 
College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 



36 



LASELL LEAVES 



When Yeu Visit Lasell Stop at 

LASELL INN 

Formerly Nye Park Inn 
46 GROVE STREET 
Between the Seminary and Station 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

FIRE PROOF GARAGE 



Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

\V/ 2 Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



To the Students and Faculty 
of Lasell Seminary 

You are invited to use the Auburndale office of 
the Newton Trust Company whenever you find it 
convenient. We would like to carry an account 
for you on our ledgers — receiving deposits and 
cashing your checks any time during banking- 
hours. It will be a convenient way of keeping 
your cash account. 

COURTESY IS OUR WATCHWORD 

Newton Trust Company 

Auburndale Office - 339 Auburn Street 

Hours 8-2. Sat. 8-12 Tel. Newton North 2640 



LASELL LEAVES 



37 



THE 

DOLLAR SILK STOCKING 

THAT WEARS 

"Radcliffe" 

In black and all colors to match any 
shoe or gown. Cotton toe, sole and 
high spliced heel, reinforced garter 
top. 

Postage prepaid anywhere. 

ANGUS & CLARK 

Dexter Building 

453 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



=iran 



HAPPINESS 

Is one thing of which 
the world never has 
enough 

KornfelcPs Millinery 

is another 



Sixty-five to Sixty-nine Summer St, 
Boston Mass. 







OBB 



MISSES' SUITS 

New Fall Styles 



25 and 35 




Unusually smart in outline, with youth- 
ful touches which distinguish them from 
the more conservative lines in women's 
suits. 

Broadcloths, Wool Velours, Serges and 
more than a dozen other materials, many 
fur trimmed. 

Cfjanbler & Company 

151 Cremont street, Boston 



38 



LASELL LEAVES 



Send for new Fall Booklet 

LOMBARD BLOUSES 

FOR THE 

COLLEGE GIRL 



Serge Middy Suits 
Separate Skirts 
Latest Models in Sport Coats 
Sweaters — Bloomers — Scarfs- 
Toques, etc. 



Henry S. Lombard 

22 to 26 Merchants Row 
BOSTON, MASS. 



A. SHUMAN & CO. 



The Service Store 



Tailored Apparel for 

College and Seminary 

Girls 

Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabric — 



Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 



Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



SCHOOL Note Books 

._ Tiw^xmrriTv wr Students' Paper 
STATIONERY Fountain Pens, etc. 

Engraved and Printed 

Programs — Invitations — Dance Orders 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON 7 SQUARE 

BOSTON - - MASSACHUSETTS 
Telephone 686 Hay market 




LASELL LEAVES 



39 






PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Receipts 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 PORTLAND ST., BOSTON 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for Price List of over 60 kinds 



Albert P. Smith 



Telephone Richmond 1647, 1648 



SMITH BROTHERS 
Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hal! Market 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Tunbridge Creameries 



Established 1842 



Incorporated 1910 



Capital paid in $90,000.00 



SANDS, FURBER & CO., Inc. 

Commission Merchants 
Fruit and Produce 

Nos. 88, SO and 92, 16 and 17 North Side 
Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

W. S. GLIDDEN, Pres. H. F. RICE, Vice-Pres. 

C. H. CUMMING, Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 

Telephone 1552 Richmond 



George C. Folsom 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 



Collins & Fairbanks Co. 



EXCLUSIVE 

MILLINERY 

AND COATS 

FOR 

Young* Women 



383 Washington St., Boston 



Crane s Grey lawn 

Let us show you our new Greylawn 
with Striped Lined Envelopes. 
Strikingly and distinctively hand- 
some. 

New PARIS IDEAS in Dies 

Hallowe'en and Place Cards 
in beautifully colored designs 

F. W. DAVIS & CO. 

STATIONERS 
ENGRAVERS 

36 West Street, Boston 



40 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARKf HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS, 
HARRY T. MILLER - - Proprietor 

Steam Heat — Elevators Electric Light — Sun Parlor 

A select suburban hotel, catering to a dis- 
criminating clientele. Five minutes from 
Lasell Seminary. Transients accommodated. 
Terms reasonable. 

GO TO THE 

BOULEVARD PHARMACY 

(THE NEW DRUG STORE) 
FOR YOUR 

Ice Cream Sodas 

Toilet Articles, etc. 

EVERY THING FIRST CLASS 

BOULEVARD PHARMACY 
2090 Commonwealth Avenue - Auburndale 




Those who embroider 
will find 

our department of 
special interest 

We show a large and attractive variety 
of styles in doilies, scarfs, tablecovers, pil- 
lowtops, shirtwaists — as well as many nov- 
elties which the College girl finds useful in 
making her living room "homelike". Free 
instruction in the various stitches is fur- 
nished in connection with purchases. 

For over a hundred years we have been 
a specialty store for 



TABLE LINENS WASH GOODS 
HANDKERCH'FS VEILINGS 
YARNS CRETONNES 

BED CLOTHING 



WHITE GOODS 

HAMBURGS 

RUGS 



T. D. Whitney & Co. 

''Everything in Linens" 

Tample Place — West Street - Boston 




Ladies are delighted 

with the results of using Camp- 
bell's Stain on Floors, Furni- 
ture and Woodwork. 

Gives superb finish, brings out 
the natural grain of the wood. 
Write for color card 

Carpenter-Morton Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Established 1882 



Incorporated 1904 



GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Cositumers 

6 Boylston Place, Boston, Mass. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Oxford 145 

C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 

Jflustc Bealerg 

Announce their Removal to 
2B Park Street, Boston. Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Three doors above their old store. Send for our recent 
catalogues. Mail orders filled the same day as received. 
Music sent on selection if desired. 



Crockery 
China and Glass 

The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in these lints 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glass 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits by our buyers to the 
bsst makers in Great Britain. France, Germany, Austria, Italy, 
Japan and America. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS Gallery 

Jones, McDuffe & Stratton Co. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

33 Franklin Street, Boston 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 



' 



ASELLLEAVES 






DU 



OVINC BMBEH 



BOSTON 
STUDIOS 

161 TREMONT ST. 

Tel. Ox. 858 
164 TREMONT ST. 

Tel. Ox. 2687 




NEW YORK 
STUDIO 

306 FIFTH AVENUE 



OSTONi 



HPHE distinctive individuality of our photo- 
*• graphs will appeal to you. They repre- 
sent a wonderful advance in methods — and 
while the elemenjbs that enter into their pro- 
duction are the most expensive known in the 
Art of Photography, the cost will be to you 
will be no more than that of the indifferently 
made photograph. 

Your patronage is most cordially invited. 

Class photographs for Lasell Seminary 




Our Stock Never Gets Old 

NEW GOODS ARRIVE EVERY DAY 



JiSUMMERSI 

WHOLESALE 
ST RETAIL 

■ CHARGE 
I ACCOUNTS 
I OPENED 



Diamonds 
Watches 
Silver Goods 
Combs 
Cut Glass 
Coral Jewelry 
Roman F earls 
Ebony Goods 



Vanity Cases 
Photo Frames 
Leather Goods 
Fountain Pens 
Brass Goods 
Chafing Dishes 
Percolators 
Parisian Ivory 



Our Watch and Jewelry Repair Departments do 
the best work at very low prices 

MR. F. F. DAVIDSON 
AUBURNDALB 



LASELL LEAVES 



41 




A 

Coming-out 
Announcement 

f~)ER new department, devoted ex- 
clusively to misses apparel, has 
just made its opening bow — and is 
already one of the most popular 
debutantes in the world of fashion. 
Our third floor is now given over 
to showing unusual styles and val- 
ues in misses apparel. 



JF. $. ©'Connor Co. 

157 Fremont £>t. ( liogton 



New England' s Leading Specialty Shop. — Suits — Gowns 
Coats — Furs — Blouses — Neckwear — Hosiery 








Vi. 



J 



OUR STOCK OF 

LADIES' FURS 



shows the smartest and most popular 
styles for the Fall and Winter season. We 
buy only from reliable Furriers and can 
save you from 25% to 30% on every piece 
we sell. 



P. P. ADAMS 

BIG DEPARTMENT STORE 

133-139 Moody Street 
WALTHAM 



THE "BEST SERIES 

of MUSIC BOOKS 



EACH VOLUME 25 CENTS 



Vocal 

25 Best easy classics 
25 Best piano classics 

25 Best parlor pieces 

Vol. I 
25 Best parlor pieces 

Vol.11 
25 Best operatic 



Instrumental 

25 Best songs 

25 Best encore songs 

25 Best English ballads 

25 best songs for 

young girl 



arrangements 25 Best folk songs 

The Boston Music Company 

26&28 West St. 26&28 

BOSTON MASS. 



42 



LASELL LEAVES 



AN OLD CARPET HOUSE 

FOR 98 YEARS we have been dealing in Floor 
Coverings, and today we are undoubtedly the 
best known Carpet and Rug House in New England 

We have more capital invested in Floor Coverings than any other con- 
cern in Boston, we show a much larger assortment and our prices are 
as low, if not lower, than elsewhere. 

We have customers in nearly every State in the Union, and man^y fami- 
lies have traded with us for several generations. 

FOR MANY YEARS WE HAVE SUPPLIED THE 
CARPETS USED IN LASELL SEMINARY. 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

646 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St., Boston 



Meyer Jonasson & Go 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS.. BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Waists, Shirts, Sweaters 
and furs 



GARMENTS FOR SEMINARY GIRLS 
A SPECIAL FEATURE 




THE NEW WALKING HOOT 

A New Model in Lace or Button in Dull Calf or Pateni 
Leather with Cloth or Kid Top, Low Heels. Riding 
Boots and Dress Boots in many styles. 

10% cash discount to students and faculty of Lasell 
160 Tremont Street, Boston 




L&AVE5 



DUX FEMINA FACTI" 



Vol. XXXXI LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., NOVEMBER, 1915 No. 2 

Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 



Business Manager 
JESSIE SHEPHERD 



Local Editor 
MAUDE HAYDEN 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



Editor-in-chief 
CAROL RICE 

Art Editor 
CHARLOTTE WHITING 

Personal Editor 
HELEN MERRILL 



Subscription Editor 
JESSIE SHEPHERD 
Assistant Subscription Editor 
MARGARET POWELL 



Exchange Editor 
ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 

Class Presidents 44 Editorial 57 

Literary 45 Personal 58 

Locals '. 52 Exchanges 64 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain & Farrar Inside front cover 

Thomas Long Inside front cover 

F. P. O'Connor Co 41 

Boston Music Co 41 

P. P. Adams 41 

T. E. Moseley Co 42 

Meyer Jonasson & Co 42 

John H. Pray & Sons Co 42 

Jordan Marsh Co 65 

Thayer McNeil Co 65 

C. H. Hovey & Co 65 

Houghton Gorney Co 66 and 67 

Wellesley Inn 67 

Delicatessen Store 67 

Capodanno & Albano 67 

Hayden 67 

Newton Trust Co 68 

Pinkham & Smith 68 

Lasell Inn 68 

Chandler & Co 69 

Hill Smith & Co 64 

Thorndike & Stolar 64 



Angus & Clark 69 

Kornfeld 69 

English Tea Room 70 

A. Shuman & Co 70 

Damon 70 

H. S. Lombard 70 

A. T. Bridges 71 

Smith Bros 71 

Sands Furber 71 

Collins & Fairbanks 71 

F. W. Davis 71 

George C. Folsom 71 

Boulevard Pharmacy 72 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton 72 

Carpenter. Morton 72 

George P. Raymond 72 

Woodland Park Hotel 72 

T. D. Whitney 72 

C. W. Thompson 72 

Hotel Puritan Inside back cover 

E. T. Slattery Inside back cover 




Florence Balch, Juniors 
Onalee Lang, Sophomores 



CLASS PRESIDENTS 



Francis Harris, Seniors 



Margaret Ufford, Freshman 
Buelah Coward, Preps 




THAT LETTER 

Irvington, Montana, 
November 15, 1914. 
Dearest "Bud" — 

You are just the dearest, sweetest man. 
What answer did you think I would give to 
your dear but rather unexpected question? 
Of course, "Bud," darling, it is — yes! 

As you suggested I will meet you in B. 

on November 30 at the station. You must 
forgive me if I was slow in answering but you 
know me well enough to know that it wasn't 

because I don't love you. You know 

but there, I will leave all that until I can see 
you. 

Your own, 

Barbara. 

As Arthur Ransom read this most trite and 
gushing note his brow was wrinkled in a 
puzzled frown. 

Now Arthur as "Bud," as he was known to 
his intimates, was one of the finest fellows 

that H. S. L. had sent to B College 

that year. He would not do anything that 

would entail grave consequences but like 

most normal fellows of his age he possessed a 
rampant spirit of mischief. So it is not to be 
wondered at that the puzzled frown soon dis- 
appeared and he strode, or rather went by 
leaps and bounds, to a certain room on "third" 
and bursting in very unceremoniously cried, 
"Say, Rex, see if this isn't rich!" 

Rex, already used to the startling ways of 
his freshman friend, took the note and hastily 
scanned it. "By Jove, Bud, why didn't 



you let a fellow know you were engaged? 
Congratulations old top! I say 

"Calm yourself," was the rejoinder, "or 
in other words, please subside until I ex- 
plain. The plain unvarnished truth is that 
I never saw or heard of the girl before. I 
never knew I possessed such charms that a 
girl would fall that desperately in love with- 
out even meeting me. I 

"Great Scott, man! She can't be much of a 
girl to do a thing like that. I tell you what, 
string her along for a little while, can't you?" 

Rex's bright black eyes twinkled and he had 
hard work to keep from laughing outright. 
At last, unable to bear it any longer, he leaped 
out of the room and down the hall with the 
letter in his handl 

"Hey there, bring back that letter you " 

but the rest was drowned as Bud feveri.hly 
gave chase to his flying comrade who, how- 
ever, disappeared into his fraternity's sanctum 
sanctorum before he could be caught. 

Say fellows, it has come! It has come!" 
and Rex excitedly waved the letter in the air 
as he rushed in among the crowd of "frat 
men" who had gathered in their club room 
for a conclave. 

"Rex Robinson, you don't mean to say 
that you actually wrote that torn fool letter? 
Well, it sure runs through your family to be 
dead game sports. Now, that you have done 
it it will be much easier for us to initiate Bud. 
One of us can dress up as a girl and one as a 
minister and fix him on November — Novem- 
ber — oh, 30th the letter says, doesn't it?" 



46 



LASELL LEAVES 



"Some scheme, Bill. Sposun you be the 
bride and Bob here the minister. He's our 
one dignified member anyway." 

"All right, Bunny. But remember fel- 
lows, not a word of the truth of this matter 
are you to let out to Bud now or later until 
I say so." 

"Ay, ay, sir!" 

"But, Bill, spossun he won't go and meet 
her. What then?" 

"Oh, but he will Bunny. Even if I 
haven't known him but a couple of months I 
know he wouldn't miss it if he was hanged 
for it afterward." 

On November 30th, the Limited from New 
York steamed imposingly into the great 
terminal station at B The iron mon- 
ster seemed to have rather a disturbing in- 
fluence on one young man who shifted ner- 
vously around in his seat near the door of the 
great waiting room. Soon the thumping of 
his heart and the nervous twitching of his 
hands indicated that a certain tall, slender 
and heavily veiled young lady was coming 
directly toward him, preceded by a porter 
with several bags. Bud, for you must have 
guessed who it was, rose irresolutely but was 
soon assured that this beautiful stranger 
was "his Barbara" for she rushed up to him 
with open arms. He gave her a nervous little 
peck on each cheek and then without a 
word except a brief, "follow me!" he paid the 
porter, took the bags and making a pathway 
through the swarming hundreds, lead her 
to the row of taxis lined up outside the 
station. 

Alone in the narrow confines of the taxi 
with this strange young lady Bud passed a 
few extremely awkward moments. When the 
hotel was reached this most extraordinary 
couple had exchanged nothing but a few per- 
functory remarks. But once there, Bud's 
attitude suddenly changed and he played the 
part as though he really meant it. "Good 
gracious," he said to himself, "I can't allow 
her to think I am a regular cad right off the 



reel. I'll give her a little fun before I slow 
down." 

So he handed her tenderly out of the taxi 
and lead her into the great hotel as if he were 
perfectly devoted to her. But once inside, 
the "bride" who had hitherto been most sub- 
missive, took matters into her own hands and 
resolutely lead the way to a small reception 
room at the end of one of the long corridors. 
On the very instant of their entrance a tall, 
clerical looking man rose, glided quickly be- 
hind them. The click of the key in the lock 
was heard and "Bud" found himself a pris- 
oner! 

When he started to protest the clerical 
looking man interrupted him saying, "This 
is Mr. Ransom, is it not? I take great 
pleasure in being able to say that everything 
is arranged. This very morning I went after 
the license and obtained the special dispensa- 
tion of the five day law. I am now ready to 
proceed with the ceremony if you will kindly 
take your places here." He pointed to the 
corner of the room farthest from the door. 

"But, I say, there must be some mistake. 
I " 



"Young man, do you dare to assume that 
I, the Rev. Clifford Cuthbert, do not know 
what I am about? That is an offence the 
seriousness of which you probably do not 
realize. Moreover, remember the young lady 
the bride, is present. Have you no thought 
at all for the woman you have come here to I 
marry? If it is courage you need why cheer j 
up, my boy, it will soon be over. See, see| 
how calm the bride is." 

Bud thought quickly, "Here I am a prisoner| 
with a minister who is crazy and an un- 
scrupulous girl. The door being locked, I ami 
evidently to be kept here by force. Suchl 
circumstances surely give me plenty ofl 
ground for divorce if such a thing becomes! 
necessary. So here goes!" To all outwardl 
appearance perfectly calm ; he took Barbara's! 
hand and did as the minster bade him. 
{To be continued.) 

Helen N. Howe, 1917. 



LASELL LEAVES 



47 



A TRUTH 

Continued from October Leaves 

Hamilton was reveiwing this incident when a 
splash of pink by the roadside caught his eye. 
There in a patch of high grass lay a sobbing 
child. Plainly grief had entered the burst- 
ing heart of the poor little mite. 

"What's the trouble? Are you hurt?" 
asked Hamilton kindly as he jumped from 
his car. , 

The only answer was a convulsion of sobs. 
"Lost, I'll bet!" he remarked to himself, 
noting no bruises ; and to her he said coaxingly 
"Don't cry like that! Just tell me where you 
live and I'll take you home." 

A fresh outburst of grief greeted this sug- 
gestion, ''don't want to go home," wailed 
Prudence — for Prudence it was — digging her 
grimy fists fiercely into her eyes. 

"Oh, all right, all right. Only for heaven's 
sake stop crying!" expostulated Hamilton. 
He hated, above all things, to hear a child 
weep. 

The flood of tears still continued. A 
bright idea came to him. Quickly assuming 
a fairy-prince demeanor, he set the mournful 
young lady upon her feet, brought himself up- 
right and queried gallantly, "What will you 
have me do, little queen? Your every wish 
shall be gratified." 

Prud, who was on the verge of another 
agonizing sob, caught her breath in amaze- 
ment, gulped, jabbed a dirty hand into her 
eyes once more, and stared at this surprisingly 
attractive young man, Like the first bright 
ray of sunshine after a thunderstorm, broke 
the cheery, happy smile over the child's 
face. Instead of a kind old lady, a fairy 
prince had found her. No one now could make 
her believe that fairies only in story books ex- 
isted. 

"Allow me to help you into my chariot," 
and he actually bowed to her. She stepped 
daintily into the waiting car and seated her- 



self. Being a daughter of modern Eve, her 
first thought, at the swift turn of affairs, 
flew to her appearance. Frantically, she 
brushed her hair back from her face and at- 
tempted to poke the once perky, pink hair- 
ribbon into its proper form and place. Her 
face must be disgracefully dirty, certainly her 
hands were. A handkerchief was absolutely 
necessary. Her fingers searched in all con- 
ceivable places where such an article should 
be found but even her secret nooks proved 
handkerchiefless. 

"Have you a handkerchief?" she asked with 
an air of dignity she was sure Virginia would 
have assumed had she been placed n like cir- 
cumstances. 

"A handerkerchief? Why, yes, certainly," 
drawing a big one, like Father's, out of his 
pocket. 

The handkerchief procured, she endeavored 
to make herself presentable. Her efforts ac- 
complished, something of the results desired. 
When all was done, she appli k1 herself to the 
task before her — that of studying carefully 
her companion. He was so nice — he didn't 
begin conversation by asking how old she was, 
where she lived, if she liked school and all 
such silly questions. 

"Are you hungry?" 

When he did ask a question, it certainly 
was a sensible one. She nodded her black 
head in acquiescence and smiled coquetishly 
up at him — surely, that was the way Vir- 
ginia would have smiled. 

"Good! We'll turn right around and go 
over to the Yacht Club for tea, or may be you 
would rather have dinner. Remember, I am 
here only to gratify every wish," he patted her 
hands that were so primly folded in her lap. 

The fairy prince then swung his car in the 
opposite direction and let it speed smoothly 
toward the upper lake. Prudence was very, 
very quiet all the way, but after they had 
reached their destination, and had been 
ushered down the long dining room to a 



48 



LASELL LEAVES 



just-for-two table overlooking the lake, her 
tongue loosened. 

She told about Jumbo and his cart; her 
bunnies and their home in the garden; her 
dog, Sport and his tricks; her dolls and their 
wardrobes. She kept up a steady stream of 
information but not once did she mention her 
name. 

"By the way," interrupted Prud's escort, 
"you haven't even told me your name. It 
must be pretty if it belongs to you." 

Prud beamed. No one had ever flattered 
her before — she was always "only a kid." 
She hastened to explain, "Prudence Jaffray is 
my name. I'm ten years old and my father's 
name is George Jaffray. You may call me 
'Prud,' 'cause I like you." 

"You aren't Hal Jaffray 's sister, are you?" 

Acquiring the information that she was and 
that he was the smartest, handsomest brother 
that ever lived, Hamilton began reminiscing 
on the college days Hal and he had spent to- 
gether. Suddenly he stopped and begged to 
be excused. Upon his return, he resumed the 
conversation he had interrupted. 

"Yes, Hal certainly is the flower of the 
family," said serious, grown-up Prue. She 
had heard her mother use that expression, 
only yesterday, about a certain popular young 
man; so certainly, it was the proper thing to 
say. "And what is more, he is the only one 
who really loves me. He doesn't desert me, 
as Joe did today, to take another girl out in 
his motor boat. Joe's crazy about that Hall 
girl and I just hate her." 

"Oh, now, Prud, not so strong as that," 
protested Hamilton, looking at his young 
guest reprovingly. 

"Well, at least I don't like her very well," 
not willing to lose the battle entirely. 

Hamilton laughed. "That's better. Now, 
what's this about nobody loving you. Please 
tell me I'm your everlasting friend, you 
know." 

No one could resist such coaxing especially 
after such a big dinner and two plates of ice- 
cream. Therefore the story was told. Ham- 



ilton listened attentively and when the little 
speaker finished her tale, he slowly, thought- 
fully shook his head. He leaned across the 
table. 

"Prud, you aren't acting like a true sport — 
you're acting like a spoiled baby. Only 
a silly child would run away as you 
did. Just because Father and Mother were 
taking a little of their time for plans for 
Joe, do you suppose, for one minute, that they 
loved you any the less? Think of the hours 
they have taken planning things for you. 
If they didn't love you, do you suppose you 
would have your pony, dog, bunnies and all 
the rest of your pets and pleasures? Of course 
not. And Miss Virginia! She was right, 
Prud. You are too young to go to parties 
with her. Wait until you are her age and 
you'll probably go to more social affairs 
than she ever thought of. Then Joe! Prud, he 
loves you just as much as ever only he is 
getting to the age where he begins to feel 
like a grown up man, begins to take notice 
of other girls. Just the same, little Prud 
holds a great big corner in that young man's 
heart. Every boy passes through that same 
stage and— ' he stopped, as he perceived the 
tiny chin trembling and the tears gathering in 
Prud's big grey eyes. This time he passed his 
handkerchief over to her unasked for. She 
wiped her eyes attempting to slide down from 
her chair as she did so. 

"Now, Prud," begged Hamilton, quickly 
changing his lecturing tone to one of plead- 
ing. "You're not going back on me, are you?" 
He reached over impulsively to catch two 
little hands in his big one. "We're going to 
be pals, the very best of pals, so I don't want 
you to leave me now. Prud, listen! I want 
you to understand that I think you are the 
gamest kid I ever knew. I'm so proud of your 
pluck I don't know where I'm at." He dropped 
her hands to give the table a resounding whack 
to emphasize his statement. "Now, we're 
pals, aren't we? You'll let me take you home 
like a good little sport? Shake?" 

Prudence stretched out her right hand and 



LASELL LEAVES 



49 



clasped with a firm grasp, the hand of her 
new-found friend. "Sure, you bet I'll be 
you're pal." It was a bargain. 

"And you'll promise never to run away 
again?" 

"Cross my heart," the action following the 
words. 

"Hurrah for you! We won't say a word 
about this to a soul. Remember, I called on 
Hal, only to find him in Europe so I took you 
as a substitute. How's that?" 

So matters stood. When the two arrived 
at the Jaffray home, matters stood even 
better. Mother, Father, and Virginia wel- 
comed both with smiles and no questions. 
True, Joe grumbled a bit but that didn't 
matter — he loved her better than that Hall 
girl, she was sure. 

Thus, one day that had had such a dis- 
heartening beginning had turned out to be a 
festive day on Prud's calendar. That night 
when Mother came into the room to kiss her 
baby good night, a little something that dwells 
deep down in everyone's soul, sometimes called 
"conscience," began to nutter in Prud's heart. 

"Mother!" cried the remorseful one. And 
then, the whole truth was told. 

Mother laughed softly as she kissed the 
puckered lips. "Yes, dear, Mother knows all 
about it. Mr. Hamilton phoned from the 
club and told us where you were, who he was, 
and that he would bring you right home pro- 
viding we wouldn't mention a word about the 
affair. Hush, sweetheart, don't cry. Every- 
thing's all right. Yes, Mother loves you even 
better than ever. Mr. Hamilton? He's still 
talking with Virginia. What about? Why, it 
seems he stopped his car long enough this 
morning for Virginia to quiet Firefly down. 
There, try to go to sleep, dear, and remember 
that whatever Mother does, she does not be- 
cause she doesn't love you, but because she 
thinks it's right. Good night, dear." 

And with Mother's kiss fresh on her lips 
Prud sleepily murmured as the door closed, 
"Mother's always right," and drifted off to 
the Land o' Dreams. 

Edna Christensen. 



FORBIDDEN FRUITS 

On one of my trip to England, I had an 
amusing experience which I but faintly re- 
member for at the time I was but eight years 
old. 

I was the only child aboard, and as I had 
become tired of playing by myself, I was 
ready for mischief. 

I wandered down to the kitchen one day, 
and found one of the chefs, with whom I was 
a prime favorite, making taffy. There was 
one big slab, about three inches, thick al- 
ready cold. How tempting it looked to my 
eyes! I boldly begged for some, and after 
using all my arts of persuasion, went away 
hugging a large piece of the sticky confection. 

Carefully I hid it under my pillow in the 
upper berth, for I knew it would be good-bye 
candy if Mother got hold of it, for Mother 
has a sweet tooth, too. 

I usually teased to sit up for about half an 
hour after dinner and talk to the grownups, but 
tonight was an exception. I was all im- 
patience to get to bed, and I think Mother- 
suspected trouble, for it was usually only by 
threats and bribes that I was made to go. 

At last she. kissed me good-night, and shut 
the cabin door. I felt in its hiding place for 
my precious secret, and there it was, a little 
sticky, to be sure but taffy's taffy for a' 
that. 

It was dark, I was sleepy, and the candy was 
beginning to melt. I had licked all over the 
top and bottom, and had tried to eat around 
the sides, but they were too thick, and so I 
just licked some more. Pretty soon, it began 
to melt all over my hands, and I kid-like, 
wiped them on my nightie. Then my face 
got all gooey, and my curls all stuck up. I 
was long past my regular sleep-time, and I 
had all I could do to keep awake. 

Before I knew it, I felt myself being shaken 
into consciousness, and found Mother bending 
over me, with war in her eyes. The whole 
pillow was glued to me, and I to it. Such a 
stuckup child you never saw. 

How I was ever extricated, I don't remem- 
ber; but Mother's slipper, and no desert for 



50 



LASELL LEAVES 



the rest of the voyage I did not forget the 
next time the little god, Mischief, knocked at 
my brain. 

Georgina Flattery. 



EN ROUTE FOR INDIA 

Constance Blackstock, 1909, after an ab- 
sence of eight years is returning to her home 
in India. She is to be a teacher in The 
Isabella Thoburn College at Lucknow. Our 
love and best wishes go with her. Through 
the kindness of Mrs. Hilbourn, we print a 
part of an interesting letter received from 
Yokohama. 

S. S. Shinyo Maru, 

June 26, 1915. 



s|c jfc * * * 



* * * "Well, the trip has been very won- 
derful so far and looks as though it were going 
to continue to be. We crossed the conti- 
nent on the Denver & Rio Grande. It was 
perfectly wonderful through the Royal 
Gorge, and in fact, throughout that wonder- 
ful state of Colorado. After living in the 
East where it takes just a few hours to cross a 
state, it seemed so strange that we were two 
days crossing one in the West. At Salt 
Lake City we took the Western Pacific, and 
I shall never forget the glorious trip through 
the Feather River Canyon. At Oroville, 
California, they presented us with flowers. 
That state is surely a beautiful one, and 
I understand perfectly the enthusiasm and joy 
of the Californians now. 

"The Exposition I will not dwell upon, as 
you will get very graphic and beautiful de- 
scriptions from "eye witnesses." I will just 
say that it is the most beautifully artistic 
creation I have ever seen, and it does seem a 
shame that it is built just temporarily. How- 
ever, any country which can produce artists 
so skillfully and truly artistic to plan such 
a wonderful thing, has no excuse for having 
some of the architectual atrocities it usually 
has in its public buildings. 

"We left San Francisco June 19. This is 

beautiful boat, the service being excellent. 



The captain, chief steward, purser, chief 
engineer, doctor, are the only English officers. 
The others are Japanese, and the crew is 
Chinese and Japanese. The people are so 
polite and one of the chief joys is to receive 
the bow of the head waiter, as we go into the 
diningroom saloon at each meal. They wait on 
us for everything, and the luxury of it all 
suits me. This is the time when some of my 
socialistic theories have gone to smash. 

"We have some very interesting people on 
board. Dr. Goodnow of Johns Hopkins 
with his family, Miss Thomas, of Bryn Mawr. 
And then a mixed couple — Philipino and an 
American girl. We call them Mr. and Mrs. 
Philipino. 

"Yesterday we stopped at Honolulu and 
went ashore. The vegetation is decidedly 
tropical and I believe the climate is ideal. 
It never grows warmer than 85 degrees, and 
never cooler than 55 degrees. There is al- 
ways a breeze from the ocean, making it very 
pleasant for tourists who have to tramp 
eternally. However, the vegetation is so 
tropical and the fragrance of the flowers so 
oppressively heavy that it seemed rather 
enervating to us. For this reason I think 
the women have adopted a very sensible 
costume. It is nothing more nor less than 
a "Mother Hubbard," trailing in the dust. 
They look ridiculously funny, but it is the 
national costume. It seems that when the 
missionaries first went there, they wore 
nothing but "a string of beads and a dreamy 
smile," and since Mother Hubbards were the 
style in America at the time, they persuaded 
the natives of the Islands to adopt it. They 
did and have stuck to it. 

"Another interesting fact is that when the 
missionaries first went there, the land was un- 
developed and the people next door to 
savages. They helped the natives to irri- 
gate and cultivate and incidentally made 
small fortunes themselves. They are known 
as missionary millionaires, and I reckon the 
only ones of their kind anywhere in the world. 
They have a large and beautiful Central 
Union Church, where they recently raised 



LASELL LEAVES 



51 



$10,000 for some charity. This is very 
ordinary and usual. 

"We saw a great many Chinese and Japa- 
nese people roaming the streets in their native 
costumes and were exceedingly surprised at 
the large number. We found out that the 
Hawaiins were becoming almost extinct, and 
so these other people were urged to come in. 
The Chinese have inter-married, the hydrids 
being known as kanakas," a very bright 
people and considered the best cross of races. 

"Honolulu is very much Americanized. 
They have splendid dry goods stores and fine 
aNnd numerous drug stores where one can buy 
as easily as at home. Their street car ser- 
vice is excellent and it does seem strange to 
see U. S. Mail on the wagons, and little boxes 
just like the one at the corner of Woodland 
Road and Grove Street. 

"Of course the strange things are the 
Oriental people and the luxuriant growth. 
The flame of the forest, a brilliant scarlet 
flower, and the shower of gold, a canary 
colored blossom very much like wistaria in 
form were in their prime. These were mag- 
nificent and partially lined the streets. Palms 
were in abundance, and hedges around the 
gardens and houses were of the red variety of 
hibicus. It was all beautiful and showed 
abundance. 

"Our approach to Honolulu was wonderful 
and should have been written about first. 
Not being of a logical or systematic nature, 
this letter is a ramble. The harbour is per- 
fectly beautiful, the color of the water, shad- 
ing from a deep Mediteranean blue to a most 
delicate pale blue. And of course, having at 
its docks the different types of vessels one sees 
in any harbour. And then the town, with 
its beautiful growth of trees, etc, and rising 
above that the lovely knolls, at the tops of 
which the clouds just seemed to rest. It was 
a wonderful sight, arid the only pathetic thing 
about the scene was the half dozen German 
merchantmen interned there, not a sign of 
life aboard and expressing the utmost dejec- 
tion. There was a German cruiser also in- 



terned, but which was flaunting its flag in the 
stern. It has been there ever since last fall, 
when it came in very badly damaged, but 
could not go out, because it was impossible 
to complete the repairs in the time allowed. 
The coctor was telling me this morning that it 
is the one which chased this ship last year, 
when Japan first declared war. He said the 
Shinyo Maru made the trip from San Fran- 
cisco to Yokohama in thirteen days. It usu- 
ally takes nineteen." 

"Our life on the ship is a very lazy one. 
We read, eat, and sleep, with some exercise 
thrown in. It is wonderful how one enjoys 
it and it never seems to grow monotonus. 
We have such good things to eat, and I al- 
ways take the dishes with beautiful French 
names to see what they are like. For in- 
stance, last night I ordered Petits Pates a la 
Bouegeosie and what do you think I drew? 
Nothing but a delicious ham patty. The rest 
of the party calls me a regular experiment 
station, but what's the use of not having a 
little spice in life where it is to be so easily 
obtained? 

"Miss Robinson, the leader of our party is 
President of The Isabella Thoburn College, 
Lucknow, India, which by the way, is my 
address here. She is an excellent chaperone. 



***** 



This has turned into quite an epistle, but I 
hope it won't tire you too much to read it. I 
hope sometimes you will find time and energy 
to write to me, for you know I am more 
interested in Lasell than anything else, but 
Isabelle's two babies in Derby. Those do come 
first, of course, and foremost in my thoughts, 
and I know you wouldn't blame me if you 
could see them. ***** 

"Here, I have written all this rigamarole 
and not a word of thanks for the letter you 
sent to the steamer. But you knew, didn't 
you, that I meant it all the time? Thank you 
a thousand times. 

"Loads of love to 'dear everybody' at 
Lasell." 

Constance Blackstock 




LEXINGTON AND CONCORD TRIP 

O-he-la, O-he-la, 1 La-sell, rang out 

from the old girls on Monday morning, Octo- 
ber 11, as a send-off for the merry party of 
about 50 who scrambled into four large barges 
and started for Lexington and Concord. The 
trip was conducted by Mr. Winslow and Mr. 




story of Paul Revere's ride from Lexington. 
Our last stop was at Thoreau's Cairn. Here 
we left the barges at the main road and walked 
through a wooded lane until we came sud- 
denly upon a beautiful lake. Each girl added 
her good luck stone to the pile which sup- 
posedly marks the site of Thoreau's cabin. 

We arrived home in as good spirits as we 
had left, jut in time for a dinner which looked 
particularly inviting after our day's outing. 



Ordway, both of whom were most helpful in 
showing us the many points of interest in these 
two historic towns. Two houses which claimed 
our special attention were the John Hancock 
House and the "Old Manse, "where Hawthorne 
spent part of his life, and about which he wrote 
in many of his stories. We next visited 
Louisa M. Alcott's home and the School of 
Philosophy. After we had enjoyed a picnic 
lunch we drove on to Concord. This part of 
the trip was particularly interesting because 
of the tablets along the roadside relating the 



DR, VINCENT'S LECTURES 

On Wednesday evening, October the thir- 
teenth, we had the pleasure of hearing Dr. 
Vincent lecture on "Alexander Dumas," and 
on Thursday afternoon, October the twenty- 
first, he gave the third lecture of his series, 
this time on "Victor Hugo's Novels." This 
lecture was doubly enjoyed and appreciated, 
for we all took notes on it. 



SALEM TRIP 

On Monday morning, October 25, about 
thirty of us made our way to North Station, 
where we took the train for Salem. After a 
short ride, during which Mrs. Barris pointed 
out her beloved home town, Lynn, as we 
passed it, we reached our destination. A short 
walk brought us to the statue of Theobold 
Mathew, a great temperance leader. A 
little farther on was the old Grimshaw house 



LASELL LEAVES 



53 



which figures in Hawthorne's "Dr. Grim- 
shaw's Secret." Next door to this we entered 
the old Charter Street Cemetery, in which lies 
buried the body of Captain Richard More. 
His is the only marked grave of a Mayflower 
voyager. On our way to Hawthorne's birth- 
place we passed the Salem Hospital, a fine 
new building, one of the few modern ones in 
this district. We stopped for a minute in 
the old Custom House which Hawthorne des- 
cribes so well in "The Scarlet Letter," and in 
which he himself had an office at one time. 

Upon leaving the Custom House, we went 
to the House of the Seven Gables. After 
going through that quaint old dwelling, with 
its secret passage and its old-fashioned gar- 
den, the few of us who had not read Haw- 
thorne's story of that name decided to do so 
immediately. From the garden and from 
the window of little Phoebe's room one has 
a beautiful view of Salem Harbor. Nearby 
stands the Hathaway House, built in 1683. 
It is now used for settlement clubs and 
classes. The little old counting house and 
the shed which has now been transformed into 
a tea-room, lie behind the garden. 

The Peabody Museum next claimed our 
attention. While we ate our lunch, Prof. E. 
S. Morse, head curator of the Museum, told 
us a little about the collections we were soon 
to see. First we entered Weld Hall, which 
contains the Japanese ethnological collec- 
tion, the largest possessed by any Museum. 
From there we passed to the Hall of Ethnology 
containing implements of war and articles of 
dress, art, and religion belonging to the natives 
of the Malay Achipelago, Pacific Islands, 
North and South America and Africa. In 
he Natural History Room we saw specimens 
of every form of animal life, from the lowest 
to the highest, as well as numerous interesting 
botanical specimens. To many the Marine 
Room proved the most fascinating. Ships 
and various other tiny articles carved in 
bottles aroused our curiosity as to how they 
got there. 

In the Essex Institute there were two or 
three models of old-fashioned Colonial rooms, 
a one-horse chaise, and several old spinnets 




and other musical instruments. The display 
of colonial gowns and dress uniforms was 
also very attractive. Behind this building 
was a small cobbler's shop, father of all the 
other cobbler's shops of Salem, and John 
Ward's house, built in 1684. 

On our way to the Ropes Memorial we 
passed St. Peter's Church with its tiny grave- 
yard, the site of the court house in which the 
witch trials were held, and the Witch House. 

Until seven years ago the Ropes Memorial 
was the home of a well to do Salem family, 
but is now, by the will of its late mistress, 
Eliza Orne Ropes, thrown open to visitors. 
Not far from this beautiful old home stands 
the Pickering Mansion built in 1660 and oc- 
cupied now by the tenth generation of Picker- 
ings, a boy and a girl. 

Just before going to the station, some of our 
number stopped at Lowe's jewelry store to 
buy mementoes of the quaint old town and of 
this most fascinating trip. 



54 



LASELL LEAVES 



MELROSE-LASELL GAME 

Friday, October 29 proved to be a red letter 
day in the history of Lasell, for it was the 
day of the Melrose-Lasell basket-ball game. 
The weather was so fine that by three o'clock 
the lawn began to fill with onlookers waiting 
anxiously for the game to begin. After some 
delay because of the absence of two of the 
members of the Melrose team who were de- 
tained on the road on account of automobile 
trouble, the game began without them. The 
Lasell lineup was as follows: 

Jumping Center — Carol Rice. 

Side Center — Mildred Cloake. 

Forwards — Gertrude Allen, Orissa Attwill. 

Guards — Mabel Straker, Dorothy Mathias. 

The girls were in such good condition and 
saved themselves so well through all the game 
that the substitutes, Edith Hobson, Dorothy 
Redmond and Helen Gerrett were not needed. 
The linesmen were Frances Harris, Lenette 
Rogers and Helen Gerrett. 

The excitement which prevailed during the 
game started when Captains Nevins and Rice 
tossed up for choice of baskets, and the ball 
was then put into play. An unfortunate foul 
on the Melrose team resulted in the first 
score, a foul throw for Lasell. With wonder- 
ful passing and fine team work the score rose 
steadily amid wild cheers from the rooters 
led by Onalee Lang. The final score was 26- 
1 in favor of Lasell. 

Mabel Straker, the manager is already 
arranging for another game with Melrose 
when the full Melrose team will take part. 
This game was a great success, and we hope 
for more like it, as we have great confidence 
in our team. 



HALLOWE'EN 

As we entered the dining room Satur- 
day evening, Oct. 30, we were greeted by many 
grinning faces shining up at us out of the dark- 
ness. When the lights were turned on we 
saw that each table was tastefully decorated 
with autumn leaves around a Jack O'Lantern 
centerpiece. As soon as grace had been said, 



a messenger boy. strangely resembling Mer- 
velle Gratz, came downstairs and delivered a 
telegram and a long-stemmed chrysantheum 
to each teacher. The telegrams when read 
proved to contain, besides various clever 
introductions, the names of the Junior class 
officers who are as follows: 

President — Florence Baker. 
Vice President — Jessie Shepherd. 
Secretary — Phyllis Lang. 
Treasurer — Helen Bauman. 
Cheer Leader — Gertrude Allen. 

At 7.30 strange figures with stranger faces 
began to collect in the gym when suddenly a 
long line of sailor lads and lassies in white 
middies, king blue ties and yellow Tarn 
O'Shanters came running out into the gym. 

Led by Miss Warner and Miss Cloake, 
these Seniors danced the Sailor's Hornpipe, 
and then led the grand march. 

Soon after the dancing had started, we 
heard a commotion at one end of the gym., 
which turned out to be due to the Sophomores 
giving their class yell. Then Fran Harris 
waved her magic wand and announced Ona- 
lee Lang as president of the Sophomore class. 
Onalee in turn designated with her wand the 
other class officers: 

Vice President — Jacquelyn Bickford. 

Secretary & Treasurer — Anita Hotchkiss. 

Cheer Leader — Frances Hunter. 

During the applause which followed these 
announcements, the Seniors gathered around 
the piano and sang the following songs to their 
sister class: 

"Sophomores, we now congratulate you 
Here's our heart and hand to you 
May the best of luck be ever yours 
Your officers represent girls tried and true. 

1918, sisters, dear, 
The girls you've chosen are just right. 
They're mighty good representatives, 
Finest of class executives; 
Here is our very best to you." 

Later in the evening, the Freshmen gave 
their class yell and then proclaimed their 
officers: 



LASELL LEAVES 



55 



President — Margaret U fiord . 

Vice President — Katherine Moss. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Edna Edwards. 

Cheer Leader — Madeline Wallach. 

After all this excitement the dancing con- 
tinued serenely until 10 o'clock. 

Edna Crane in her old witch costume with 
her broom and black cat gave many of us, 
especially Marion Griffin, the cold shivers. 
The black cat, white polar bear, Red Riding 
Hood with a head several times larger than 
anyone's elses and Fatty Felix were all 
worthy of mention as the hits of the evening. 



Monday evening, November first, at dinner 
we heard the accustomed sound of Miss Pot- 
ter's bell. But instead of Miss Potter's giving 
a notice, Mid Cloake announced the officers of 
the Preparatory class, which are as follows: 

President — Beulah Coward. 

Vice President — Lydia Rich. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Orrea MacMillan. 

Cheer Leader — Leslie Woolf . 



The Seniors wish to thank all the classes 
for their delightful serenades. Ther songs 
were as follows : 

Juniors 

To the tune of "Just-a-Wearyin for yon" 
Here's to you, our Senior class, 
May this be the best of years; 
For you're the class chuck full of fun. 
To Gardner Hall we love to come 
To see the girls of the Blue and Gold. 
So here's good luck forevermore. 

To the tune of "Any Old Night," 

For here's to the class of 1-9-1-6 

For there's "Mid" with her wonderful pep 

Not one of the bunch is ever behind 

For they have Frau Harris as head. 

As we are the class of 1917, 

We wish you luck and all success. 

So here's to the class of 1916 

And we wish you all good-night. 

Tune of "Good- Night, Ladies." 
Howdy-do, Seniors, 
How are you to-night? 
We just came over for a little while 
To tell you that you're all right. 



To the tune of "SingL-A-S-E-double.L, Lasell" 

Now we have come together here 

To tell you of our news 

So listen close while we relate 

The officers we choose 

Here's to thee, here's to thee, here's to thee, our officers. 

Alma Mater, thine the glory 

Of our school days happy story 

Singing Specials all the year. 

Freshmen 

To the tune of "Hello, Frsicol" 

Hello, Seniors, hello: 

(How do you do tonight, we hope we're not disturbing 

you). 
Hello, Seniors, he'lo! 
(How's the air in there, you know it's awfully cold out 

here) 
We're here to greet you, and glad to meet you 
O can't you see that we're the Freshman class 
Hello, Seniois, hello! 
(How do you do to-night, we hope we're not disturbing 

you) 
Hello, Seniors, hello — o 
We hope you'll have a happy year, 
This we want you one and all to hear, 
Seniors, to you we ever will be true! 

Preps. 

To the tune of "Tokio" 

We sing a lee — sing a la — sing a loo 

it means that to you we will be true 
Seniors to you, we sing our praise 
And we all hope you'll have many happy days 
And while thru the lanes we're straying 
You can always hear us saying 
Heres to you — the Gold and Blue 
Soon we will miss you, when from Lasell your thru 
We sing a lee — sing a la — sing a loo 
Means that to you we will be true. 

Specials 

To the tune of "When You Wore a Tulip." 

We are the Specials, the jolly lass of Specials, 
Who have come to serenade 
The Senior class of nineteen sixteen, 
And may their glory never fade, 
Dear Senior class, we want to be friendly 
To all of the girls so grand. 
So we will give a rah! rah! 
For the blue and the gold 
Of the class of nineteen sixteen! 



56 



LASELL LEAVES 



To the tune of " You Knoiv and I Know." 

Here's to the Seniors, 

The best girls that we have; 
They're loyal, light-hearted, and never, never sad 

We love them we'll back them 

In everything they do. 

So give a rah, rah! for sixteen, 

Now, Seniors, here's to you. 
To the tune of "Just a Little Love , a Little Kiss." 

Just your best and truest kind of fun 

Is admired by us and every one, 

And we pledge our faithfulness and loyalty 

To the Blue and Gold of 1916. 

Just a straight, square deal for everyone. 

That is what you mean to dear Lascll. 

So we'll pledge our faithfulness and loyalty 

To the Blue and Gold of 1916. 

To the tune of "My Bonny Lies Over the Ocean." 
Our Seniors live ovei in Gardner Carpenter, 
At Carpenter way upon the hill. 
Our Seniors well-loved by the Specials 
Here's to you with lads of good will- 
Seniors, dear Seniors, 
So loyal and faithful to the white and blue 
Seniors, dear Seniors, we'll always look up to you. 



Thursday afternoon, November the fourth 
Miss Potter gave- her second interesting and 
helpful lecture on "Manners and Customs." 

Thursday afternoon, October the seventh, 
Miss Packard gave us a profitable talk on the 
need of efficiency. All of us left the chapel 
made thoughtful by the many valuable sug- 
gestions that Miss Packard left with us. 

Mrs. Loomis spoke to us on Thursday after- 
noon, October the fourteenth, on "The Ethics 
of the Table." The old girls were delighted 
to have Mrs. Loomis with them again, as 
were the new girls to hear her for the first 
time. 

At the Vesper service on October 10, we 
were given a most interesting and helpful talk 
by Mr. Frank Speare, Secretary of the Educa- 
tional Department of the Y. M. C. A. He told 
us that we get from life exactly what we put 
into it. "There are two degrees," he said, 
"A. B. and S. B; A. B. means I am and S. B. 
means I can." Here at Lasell we want to 
acquire both degrees; one the degree of 
achievement; the other, the degree of ser- 
vice. 

Mrs. Fiske, former Lasell teacher, and or- 



ganizer of the Lasell Missionary Society, was 
the speaker at the Vesper service on the even- 
ing of October 17. She first told us how she, 
and another Lasell teacher, because they were 
greatly interested in missionary work, started 
the society here. She then spoke of her work 
among the American and English students in 
Paris and of the missionary work in which she 
is personally interested in Turkey and India. 

On October 24, Henry Turner Bailey spoke 

to us. He compared our physical health with 

our spiritual health and told us that just as 

we need nourishment, exercise and deep 

breathing to keep us strong physically, so we 

need all three if we would be well spiritually. 

"Spiritual nourishment" he said, "can be 

found in the Bible; exercise in doing kind 

deeds and saying kind and helpful things; and 

spiritualbreathing is obtained through prayer." 

We had Vespers at the Congregational 

Church, October 31, where we heard the Rev. 

Mr. McGuire of the Ruggles Street Church, 

give his lecture, "An Irishman's Experiences 

in Africa." It was intensely interesting and 

amusing as well. 

On October 12, Christian Endeavor was 
led by Dorothy Smith. Her talk on "The 
Spirit of Lasell" was very much enjoyed. 
Hazel Palmer, leader of Christian Endeavor 
on October 19 gave a very helpful talk on the 
"Unreturning Messengers." She spoke of the 
speeding arrow, the spoken word, the lost 
opportunity and the past life, as messenger, 
which since they can never return to us to be 
sent again, should have been sent straight 
to the place where we would have them go. 

On October 25, Miss Rand was the leader 
of Christian Endeavor. She read the story 
of the prophet Elijah's triumph over the 
prophets of Baal and with her illuminating 
explanations and descriptions led us to a 
greater realization of the depth of symbolical 
meaning in the Bible. 

Kathryn Chase was the leader on Novem- 
ber 2. Her subject was "Being Just to Our- 
selves." In a very direct manner she brought 
out the ways in which we do not do ourselves 
justice and thus do not gain the most from life. 




DITOR A 




Thanksgiving is here, the season to which 
every girl has been looking forward with the 
keenest anticipation of pleasure. It means 
to us all an occasion of feasting and rejoicing. 
While we are enjoying the wonderful Thanks- 
giving dinner, let us remember some of the 
things for which we should show gratitude. 

There are so many that it would be im- 
possible to mention anywhere near all of 
them, but let us be thankful espeially for our 
friends, our homes, our country. The gifts too, 
of food and clothing we should prize more 
highly when we recall that our sisters across 
the water are shivering and starving. The 
thought of them would put a damper on our 
joys were it not that in the rush and hurry of 
the twentieth century we have begun to 
lose the true meaning of "Thanksgiving 
Day." Have the best time possible, girls, but 
do not let your merry making blot out all 
thoughts of gratitude and of sympathy. 



About that game with Melrose last month. 
Wasn't it splendid? We all join in thanking 
the team which so faithfully represented 
Lasell. We also thank most heartily the 
second team and all of the girls who made the 
practice game possible. In turn, the teams 
thank everyone who came out and gave it 
such splendid cooperation in attendance, 
singing and cheering. 

The spirit displayed that afternoon should 



be kept up throughout the year. Show as 
much enthusiasm for all of the games and 
later for the "Field Day," "River Day," and 
"Horseback Riding Day," if we have one. 
Let every class be represented and fight for all 
it is worth. With such feeling as was shown 
at the game, we ought to have some record 
breaking, "sport days." 

Athletics is not the only department of 
school life w r here such enthusiasm is needed. 
Back up all that is attempted here at school 
with the same interest. Just now the girls 
are trying to be responsible for quiet in the 
halls as we go to chapel. Work with them 
not against them, just as you did in the easier 
ways of cheering and singing. 

This year through the students alone some 

changes for the better can be made, provided 

that everyone will stand by the Student 

Council. They need your help. Give it to 

hem, girls. 



TO CUSHMAN 

Here's to Cushman, dear old Cushman! 

With her green and spacious lawn 
May she seem as grand and stately 

On some far and distant dawn. 

Girls of Cushman. friends of Cushman 

And the Faculty now here. 
Let Uc pledge to he- devotion: 

Hold he always near and dear. 

M. L. T. 




These glorious autumn days are getting 
to be quite as popular for weddings as the 
rare days in June. 

On October 13, Eleonora Stroh became 
Mrs. Arthur Emerson Cole at Detroit. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cole are at heme after January 
the first at 333 Field Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Edna Amelia Wcolson and Mr. Irving 
Carroll Bean were married on Thursday, 
October 28, at Watertown, Conn. 

On Wednesday, November 3, occurred 
the marriage of Kathryne Gwen McClanahan 
and Dr. Joseph Aloysius Henske. At home 
after the fifteenth of December at St. George, 
N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Harris announce 
the marriage of their daughter, Josephine, to 
Mr. Harry Kutschner, on Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 9, in New York City. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry A. Crossland announce 
the marriage of their daughter, Cecelia 
Smith, to Mr. Charles A. Gilmore, on Wednes- 
day, November 10 at Marion, Ind. Mr. 
and Mrs. Gilmore will be at home after the 
first of January in San Diego, California. 

Lasell extends a loving god-speed to these 
happy young folk! 

Lasell is constantly receiving tender mes- 
sages and tributes to the memory of our dear 



Miss Nutt from, her "old girls" and former 
associates. 

Mrs. Paisley, mother of Louise Paisley, 
'09, gave us a glad surprise recently in the 
form of an unexpected call. We were sorry 
we could not keep her longer. She reports 
Louise well and together they are enjoying 
their New York home. 

Our Preceptress had the pleasure re- 
cently of calling on Josephine Siggins Utter 
in her Providence home and was delighted to 
find as her guest, Mary Starr Utter, '12. The 
girls both looked unusually well. It was 
difficult to realize that they had but recently 
been dismissed as patients from the hospital. 
One of the unexpected pleasures of that visit 
was to find Mrs. Siggins, Josephine's mother, 
and Mrs. Utter, mother of our Mary Starr 
also as guests. We are glad Josephine is 
living in our neghborhood and hope we shall 
see both of the girls often. 

Marion Griffin was made glad recently by a 
visit from her father and mother. 

Ariel Long, also, was surprised by a call 
from her mother. We would like to have 
kept these parents in our own neighborhood 
for a longer time. 

Ruth Ketcham, '13, is no longer a student 
in Chicago, but is now the private secretary 



LASELL LEAVES 



59 



of one of the most prominent and successful 
business firms. Congratulations and best 
wishes to "our secretary." 

Florence Skinner writes of her delightful 
day spent at the Connecticut Valley Lasell 
Club, which she attended in company with 
Ruth Tuthill, (still a student at Smith Col- 
lege) . Florence is busy this year with her 
music. She made us twice glad by promising 
to come to Lasell before Christmas. 

Barbara Jones, '14, wrote a dear letter 
paying special tribute to Miss Nutt. She 
expressed her pleasure over the addition of 
Jean McKay to our faculty, reports that her 
current events club is studying "Social and 
Economic Forces in American History." She 
speaks of meeting Ernestine Lederer, '13, in 
Terre Haute. Like the rest of us she longs 
to get hold of little Priscilla Winslow and 
thinks her name is "just beautiful." We 
are grateful for this newsy letter. 

In a kind message received from Katherine 
Bingaman, '14, she writes, "Our family is 
spending the winter in New York and we 
have a pleasant apartment. Hannah and I 
are taking a kindergarten course, my brother 
is in the College of Physicians and Surgeons." 
She speaks of a pleasant visit from Lena Vee 
Kelley, '13, and Evelyn Dunham, '14. She 
is wise enough to bespeak a place for herself 
and friends at Lasell for Commencement time. 

Marguerite Belt expresses her regret at 
being unable to return to Lasell this year. In 
speaking of Miss Nutt, she writes, "Her 
passing comes as a real and great grief to all 
of us girls who knew her. It must be very 
wonderful to have helped so many people as 
she helped them." We are still missing you, 
Marguerite! 

The girls who were fortunate to go on the 
Salem trip speak of the pleasant meeting with 
"Betty" Farnham, who is still at the "House 
of Seven Gables." 

Through Miss Parkhurst we learn that 
Annie Crowe Collum's (09) address is care of 
W. H. Collum & Co., 53 Bothwell St., Glas- 
gow, Scotland. Annie's husband, Mr. William 



Collum is an officer in the British army and 
at present in the front ranks in the battle- 
field. At this time Annie would be no doubt 
especially glad to hear from her old friends. 

With her subscription to the Leaves, Mrs. 
Alfred M. Wright (Edith Harber '05) sends 
this word to the editor. "I certainly will be 
glad to get the Leaves once more, and thank 
you so much for sending me the notice. Love 
to old Lasell. Mary Masters Newcomb, '07, 
was visiting Ina Harber, '06, and me for a few 
days recently." 

A delightful letter has been received from 
Edna Rogers Carlisle, '05. After speaking 
lovingly of our dear Miss Nutt, she gives us a 
charming glimpse of her home and her boy. 
We would like to print it verbatum but do not 
quite dare. However, we will venture to 
say that Edna declares she and her son are 
having a wonderful time together and says it 
would do Mrs. Martin's heart good to see him 
so full of vigor. 

Annie Armstrong and her mother spent a 
few hours recently at Lasell. We were glad 
to see them and interested in Annie's report 
of her work in college — after leaving Lasell. 

Agnes Adelsdorf Strauss, '12, sends a 
cordial note to our Preceptress and with it her 
yearly subscription for the Leaves. She ex- 
pressed the hope of seeing us this month at the 
Harvard -Yale game and we certainly shall 
have the latch string out for Agnes. Yes, 
Agnes, we would like to see that little son of 
yours, John Alexander, and are sorry you 
decided to leave him at home. 

Susan Tiffany, '14, forwarded a beautiful 
picture of one of the San Francisco Exposition 
buildings and invites us to "meet her there 
the next morning!" Unfortunately, our air- 
ship is out of commission but in imagination 
we are followng Susan and Nell Woodward, 
'14, during their delightful California days. 



CHICAGO LASELL CLUB 

In sending her greeting to the Chicago 
Lasell Club for their meeting Miss Potter 
suggested the members write a round- 



60 



LASELL LEAVES 



robin message for the Leaves. That was 
"good work" on both sides, for these 
"old girls" followed the suggestion and we 
have this bright and piquant message from 
their recent luncheon. We print it just as 
it was written. They may say, "Oh, so hasti- 
ly!" but we say how delightfully. Hotel La 
Selle, Chicago. 

Callie LeSeure, '03, is studying languages 
in Racine, Wis., this winter. Callie made me 
a flying visit this last month. 

Nell Jones Yeomans, '05. 

The Class of 1902 are planning to cele- 
brate their fifteenth anniversary at Lasell in 
June 1917 — Little John McClure Patterson 
two Thanksgivings-old is coming with his 
mother. 

Edith McClure Patterson, '02. 

Attended Imo Blakestad's wedding the 
thirtieth of September and saw Miss Brag- 
don and Miss Stone. 

Mona Ryan Inman. 

Met Helen Andrews and her dear little 
girl. She is just the same old girl. Tell 
Dr. Winslow my three boys and baby girl 
would be quite a match for his little family. 
Julia Funkhouser Mellin. 

I met two old Lasell girls while at Madeline 
Island, Wis. this summer. Miss Nell Heffel- 
finger and (she that was) Bertha De Bruler 
of Evansville, Ind., now Mrs. Donavan. I 
have done work in Kindergarten and story 
telling in hospitals ( children's wards) . Three 
months in New York City. 

Loretta Salmon, '02. 

On my way to the train bound East I have 
lingered to attend the Chicago Lasell 
Luncheon, glad I did for I have seen so many 
girls I knew, two years or so ago and have not 
seen since. I am sitting beside Edith Mc- 
Clure Patterson and Nell Jones Yeomans. 
Bertha Hayden King, '03. 

Elizabeth Thielens Miller is still living with 
her mother, 6711 Stewart Ave., and on Oct. 



30 will be matron-of-honor at her sister-in- 
law's wedding. 

May Florine Thielens Peeples is feeling 
wonderfully well. Always interested in Lasell 
news and gatherings and wish you were all 
here to enjoy this splendid luncheon with us. 

Frances Bragdon, '05, has ten fingers, each 
one in a different pie! 

Edna Mathews Condit is planning to study 
French this winter. 

Charlotte Thearle Seeker is thoroughly en- 
joying meeting these dear old Lasell girls 
again. She is very much occupied with her 
two babies — Henry Thearle Seelcer, aged four 
and Eleanor Jane Seelcer aged eleven months. 
Between lullabies, she is studying composition 
and writing an occasional song. 

Lucile Zeller Ericson, '04, is busy trying 
to apply the theory that "two children are no 
more trouble to care for than one." Results 
are doubtful, but she is happy to be busy for 
such a good cause. 

Mary Goodwillie, '12, has just announcec 
her engagement to Mr. Foster Townsend, 
brother of Pearl Townsend. 

Ruth E. Ketcham, '13, is doing secretaria 
work. 

Dorothy Bushnell is going to visit me next 
week. 

Dora E. Goodzvillie, '14. 

Very busy teaching Sunday School. 

Barbara Jones, '14. 

Studying music in Chicago. 

Vera Wallace. 

I am studying Household Economics in 
Chicago. Visited Edna Nichols Crosby in 
Liberty ville last week-end. How is Miss 
Mabel and the post-office? 

Florence Mc Kit-trick. 



Met Edna Mathias Dinet in Chicago 
several days ago. She like myself is a bus 
and very happy housekeeper. 

Edna Nichols Crosby. 



LASELL LEAVES 



61 



Have been visiting Helen Latimer and ex- 
pect her next month. 

Velma Voltz. 

I haven't rocked the boat yet (Lasell girls 
here during the scarlet fever will remember 
this joke) . 

Dorothy Darrow. 

Helen Ehrman and I, (Lucille Guertin) 
graduated from the Chicago School of Applied 
and Normal Arts last year. We are both 
taking the Post-graduate course now and 
are specializing in Illustration. 

Still teaching languages at Girton School, 
Winnetka, 111. 

Bess C. Shepherd. 



field Butler, Lucy Pinney Calmer, Christine 
Franck, Florence K. Jones, '12. yi 

Florence adds "Mabel and Ida have just re- 
turned from Lake Mohawk and Rochester 
and brought Anna Rouse home with them." 
"Wish you could see the cute picture I just 
received of Lillian Buehner Ladd and her 
baby." 

Frieda and Louise Mayer were at the 
luncheon and sent a special card to Lasell 
which was much appreciated. Florence Jones 
also sends the menu for the day and one of the 
little blue bound books of Lasell songs which 
were used at the luncheon. 



The Leaves is indebted to Florence K. 
Jones, '12, for forwarding the above delight- 
ful contribution and in her kind note the 
following names of the forty-eight girls "who 
were there :' ' 

Ruth Ketcham, '13, Barbara Jones, '14, 
Nell Jones Yeomans, '05, Lestra Hibbard 
Saxton, '96, Edna Mathews Condit, Frances 
Bragdon, '05, Lucile Parish Chickering, Vera 
Wallace, Margherita O. Dike, TO, Julia Funk- 
houser Mellin, Hortense Gowing, Florence 
McKittrick, Edna Nichols Crosby, Velma 
Voltz, Edith McClure Patterson, '02, Bertha 
Hayden King, '03, Sara Hayden Carlton, '95, 
Blanche Harber Hart, Mary S. Lumbard, 
TO, Charlotte T. Seeker, Lucile Zeller Eric- 
son, '04, Helen E. Carter, '07, Dora E. Good- 
willie, '14, Mary C. Goodwillie, 12, May 
Florine Thielens Peeples, Clara Roesing Tay- 
lor, Alma L. Bunch, '13, Dorothy Darrow, 
Mona Ryan Inman, Dorothy Rogers, Loretta 
Salmon, Bertha Hax Auld, Emily Brookfield 
Hardy, Sarah Coulton, Margaret M. Jones, 
Tl, Rebecca Shepherd, '94, Lucile Guertin, 
Allie Gardner Rogers, Flora M. Gardner, '93, 
Frieda J. Mayer, '11, Louise E. Mayer, Tl, 
Annette Padley Matthews, Helen Staples Ells- 
worth, Hazel Carey Adam, '05, Fannie Brook- 




tgfig? 




GLEANINGS FROM "EXAMS" 

From the Berkshire Industrial Record. 
What is a sentence? 

A sentence is a group of word expiring one's 
thoughts. 

How should a cold be treated? 

When you have a cold you are to wrap it 
up with a flannel cloth and stay out of the 
cold. 

Name the parts of the eye. 
Ball and socket. 

Mention an import of France. 
England is an import of France. 

Name three occupations of your country. 
Italians, Americans and Hebrews. 

Name one export from England and one 
from Italy. 

England exports teal goods and Italy ex- 
ports soldiers. 

How has the water route from New York 
to San Francisco recently been made shorter? 

It has been made shorter by the heat of the 
sun. 

Why does one breathe rapidly when run- 
ning? 

Because we shake our blood and heart. 

Who is the author of the Star Spangled 
Banner? 

Miles Standish. 

What is the purpose of an index? Where 
is it usually found? 

The purpose of an index is to find the names 
and location of different people you would like 
to see. It is usually found in a drug store. 



Name an organ of the body and give its 
use. 

The throat is the organ the food passes 
through and also water. 

Where are the organs of taste and smell? 

The organs of taste and smell are in the 
head, the smell being over the ear and the 
taste being in back of the ear. 

Give one use of the skin. 
The skin keeps the blood from running out 
of the body. 

Name two articles of food that produce 
muscle. 

Work and eat. 

Mention one use of the nerves. 

Nerves are used to grow hair on the body. 
If we did not have any nerves in our teeth 
we would not enjoy our food as much as we 
do. If the body had not nerves the people 
would not have the nerve to do anything. 

Why do they raise mulberry trees in France? 
Because they plant them. 

Locate the heart. 

The heart is on the western side of the body. 



Professor — "What animal is satisfied with 
the least nourishment?" 

Pupil — "The moth. It eats holes."— Ex. 



Overheard at the dance — The Cuff — "Wilt 
thou?" 

The Collar— "I wilt." 



Miss Witherbee to Juniors: "Never close a 
letter with 'I am' or 'remain'. We know you 
are and we hope you will remain." 



LASELL LEAVES 



63 



G. B. — What kind of a waist are you going 
to have?" 

H. G.— "Jersey." 

G. B. — "Huh! I guess I'll have a Holstein. 



Fraulein H. explaining leben and wohnen 
to M. Griffin. 

"Leben is when you live, just breathe; and 
wohnen is when you live in Indianapolis." 

How did she ever happen to connect Marion 
and Indianapolis? 



We wondered from the amount of material 
in Miss McKay's cap, Hallowe'en night, 
whether the Seniors were already "broke." 



Gertrude Allen (translating French) "and 
the forest was filled with underbrush and 
savage prune trees." 



In physiology recently Dr. Godfrey was 
telling us about the gastrocnemius muscle. 
In whispers loud and clear Helen Stephan 
guessed, "That must be in the stomach," 
just as Dr. Godfrey informed us that it was 
one of the muscles in the calf of the leg. 
Guess again, Helen. 



New girl to Miss Potter after she has an- 
nounced Priscilla's Winslow's arrival: "Will 
you please tell me at which table she is 
sitting?" 



When Mae Chan explained that in China 
when she went shopping she rode in a sedan 
chair, Dot Mathias inquired, "What is a 
sit-down chair?" 



Late styles in spelling: 

"Three fowls put her out of the game." 

"A gasp was heard all over the ordiance." 

"People were standing in the isles." 

"The chime peeled out over the city." 

"The anarchist is very sourcastic." 

"Rip tasted of the ticker." 

"In the pasture she was coronered by a colt." 



Owner of auto: "See here, sir, your bill for 
repairs is outrageous. Why, it's more than 
the old car is worth!" 

Mechanic: "Well you can leave the car in 
part payment if you like." Ex. 



"THANKSGIVING DAY AIN'T FAR AWAY' 
By Lewis Allen 

Thanksgiving Day 

Ain't far away 
And you juest bet I'm glad 

'Cause ma, she'll make 

Some pies and cake 
And then she'll say to dad; 

"Now go to work 

And find a turk 
Down to the butcher-store 

One nice and fat — 

A turkey that 
Will weigh twelve pounds or more!" 

Then ma she'l fuss 

And bake and muss 
And I'll juest set and sigh 

Over the fate 

That makes me wait 
For her good pumpkin pie. 

There's pears and quince 

And peach and mince 
And cel'ry stalks all white 

And cake and tarts 

And spice that smarts. 
Oh gee! it's outer sight! 

Thanksgiving Day 

Ain't far away 
And when it comes you'll see 

The pies and cakes 

Thai: mother makes 
Just disappear in me. 

It's awful bliss 

To think of this — 
The day we all set down 

And eat, and eat, 

And eat, and eat 
That turkey good and brown! 



FIGURATIVELY SPEAKING 

Tho they had never met be 4 
What cause had she 2 care? 

She loved him lOderly because 
He was a 1,000,000 aire:.— Ex. 




We acknowledge the following October 
Exchanges : 

E. 0. H. S. Neius, East Orange, N. J.; 
Vindex, Elmira Free Academy ; Knick Knacks 
Shady Side Academy; Tech Monthly, Techni- 
cal H. S.,,Scranton; Goldenrod, Wayne State 
Normal; The Lit, Watertown H. S.; The Imp, 
Brighton H. S. ; The Tatler, El Paso, H. S.; 
The Artisan, Bridgeport; The Hermonite, 
Northfield Schools; The Owl, Middletown, N. 
Y. ; Vail-Deane Budget, Vail-Deane School; 
Alpha, New Bedford H. S.; The Purple and 
Gray, Burlington, la.; The Iris, Phila. H. S.; 
for Girls; The Tatler, Nashua H. S.; The 
Mirror, Bethlehem, Pa.; The Aegis, Houston 
H. S.; Lotus, Dover H. S.; The X-Ray, Ander- 
son, Ind.; The Optimist, Newark, N. J.; The 
World, St. Paul; TheGrotonian, Groton, Mass. ; 
Lion, La Grange, 111.; Purple and Gold, Os- 
ceola, Ark.; Newton H. S. Review; The Vir- 
ginian, Norfolk, Va.; The Ramble, Cornwall- 
on-Hudson, Mirroi, Pratt, Ark. ; Record, 
Evansville, Ind.; Central High News, Minne- 
apolis. 

Knick Knacks — Your paper is pleasing on a 
whole. Why not acknowledge all of the ex- 
changes you receive? 

The Vindex — The department cuts are 
good. It improves a magazine not to mix the 
advertisements and literary matter so much, 
as you have done toward the end of your 
paper. 



The Virginian — Your Exchange cut is well 
done and attractive. A re-arrangement'of 
your departments, such as having the literary 
come first might be better. 

The Imp — Your Hallowe'en cover is well 
drawn but the cuts are disappointing. 

FINEST LINE IN BOSTON 



8g CHRISTMAS CARDS M 

M FANCY BOX STATIONERY ffi 

f UNIQUE DESKS SETS % 

STUDENTS NOTE BOOKS m 

Loose Leaf Specialists Blank Book Manufacturers 

HILL, SMITH & CO., Stationers 
8 MILK STREET, BOSTON 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE 



RUDOLF STOLAR 



883 



TELEPHONES ° RICHMOND 

885 



THORNDIKE & STOLAR 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, Pork, Lamb & Veal 

Stalls 3 and 5 New Faneuil Hall Market 
BOSTON, MASS. 



LASELL LEAVES 



65 



Kimonos and Bathrobes 

Exposition of Beautiful New Models 
In Our Enlarged Selling Section 



Eiderdowns 
French Flannel 
Silk Muslin 



Blanket Clo'.h 

Albatross 

Ripple Eiderdown 



Figured Silk 
Figured Cotton Crepe 
Plain Crepe 



Bathrobes, Dressing Sacques and Kimonos — hundreds of new and beautiful models — one of 
the largest and best assortments in New England. No matter what you need in the way of a 
negligee, from the least expensive to the most elaborate, you will find it here at prices which we 
guarantee to be as low or lower than elsewhere. 

Jordan Marsh Company 

BOSTON 



PLASTIC SHOES 




(BOOTS 
Styles SHOES 

PUMPS 



To increasing numbers the words 
PLASTIC FOOTWEAR are synony- 
mous with COMFORT. Its flexibility, 
permitting free action to the muscles of 
the foot, tends to their strengthening. 

Modified Plastics for those 
not wishing the full models 

Thayer, McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



Ultra and Conservative Styles that Delight 


THE 


COLLEGE CIRL 




IN 


Frocks 


Furs Accessories 


Suits 


Millinery of 


Coats 


Waists all kinds 


C. F. 


, Hovey Company 


Summer, Chauncy and Boston 
Avon Streets Mass. 



66 



LASELL LEAVES 



Telephones Hay market 2311-2312 



Flowers 
of Quality 



HOUGHTON -GORNEY CO. 

:-: Florists :-: 



119 TREMONT STREET 

[Park Street Church] 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Specialty 

Flower Shop of Boston 



FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED TO ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Free Delivery to Lasell 



LASELL LEAVES 

LASELL STUDENTS 



67 



are cordially invited to visit the new 

Delicatessen Store 

Commonwealth Avenue and Lexington St. 

Here you will find the choicest home-made 
cakes and candies, sandwiches, ice cream 
and other delicacies. 



CAPODANNO & ALBANO 



Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco. 



431 AUBURN ST., 



AUBURNDALE, MASS 



Tel. Con. 1275 N. W. 



ft^anfesigtbmg Cijeer 

jf or tfje i)ogtegg, #uegt anb g>tap*at=i)ome 
anb Jf loral (greetings telegrapfjeb anptofjere 
in tfje ©ntteb States at stfjort notice. 

i>ougf)ton=<8>ornep Co. 



$arfe Street Cfjunfj 



Jfforigtsf 

119 Fremont Street, Boston 



Jfflatl anb tEelepftone #roers Will Eeeetbe 
Jfflost Careful attention. 



You and your friends are welcome 
to the 

WELLESLEY INN 

Steak and Chicken Dinners 

A SPECIALTY 

Automobile and week-end parties Accommodated 
Tel. Wellesley 21050 



HAYDEN 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

Solid gold and sterling novelties 
College and Society Emblems 

(LASELL SEAL RINGS) 



68 



LASELL LEAVES 



When You Visit Lasell Stop at 

Lasell Inn 

Formerly Nye Park Inn 

49 GROVE STREET 

Between the Seminary and Station 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 
FIRE PROOF GARAGE 



Pinkham & Smith 
Company 

Prescription Opticians and 
Photographic Supplies 

We invite you to visit us when in 

need of our products. We supply 

the Best at Moderate Cost 

288-290 Boylston Street 

1$14 Bromfield Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



^:: 



& 



To the Students and Faculty 
of Lasell Seminary 

You are invited to use the Auburndale office of 
the Newton Trust Company whenever you find it 
convenient. We would like to carry an account 
for you on our ledgers — receiving deposits and 
cashing your checks any time during banking 
hours. It will be a convenient way of keeping 
your cash account. 

COURTESY IS OUR WATCHWORD 

Newton Trust Company 

Auburndale Office - - - - 339 Auburn Street 

Hours 8-2. Sat. 8-12 Tel. Newton North 2640 



LASELL LEAVES 



69 



THE 

DOLLAR SILK STOCKING 

THAT WEARS 

"Radcliffe" 

In black and all colors to match any 
shoe or gown. Cotton toe, sole and 
high spliced heel, reinforced garter 
top. 

Postage prepaid anywhere. 

ANGUS & CLARK 

Dexter Building 

453 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



0G 



Dfl 1=1 



HAPPINESS 

Is one thing of which 
the world never has 
enough 

Kornfeld's Millinery 

is another 

Sixty-five to Sixty-nine Summer St. 
Boston Mass, 



E 



3QB 



MISSES COATS 

Special Values at 

$ 25 a nd $ 35 

Others 16.50 to 100.00 




Chandler & Co. specialize in coats in 
styles for misses and young women. 
Many are adapted from Paris models, 
yet at prices one-third to one half less. 

CJjanbler & Company 

151 Cremont Street, Boston 



38 



LASELL LEAVES 



Send for new Fall Booklet 

LOMBARD BLOUSES 

FOR THE 

COLLEGE GIRL 



Serge Middy Suits 
Separate Skirts 
Latest Models in Sport Coats 
Sweaters — Bloomers — Scarfs- 
Toques, etc. 



Henry S. Lombard 

22 to 26 Merchants Row 
BOSTON, MASS. 



A. SHUMAN & CO. 



The Service Store 



Tailored Apparel for 

College and Seminary 

Girls 

Man-tailored from Men's Wear 
Fabric — 



Suits, Coats, Waists, 
Sweaters, Hats, Shoes 
at reasonable prices 



Style and Service 



Women's and Misses' Shops 
SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



SCHOOL Note Books 

STATIONERY Fountain Pens, etc. 

Engraved and Printed 

Programs — Invitations — Dance Orders 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON ^ SQUARE 

BOSTON - - MASSACHUSETTS 
Telephone 686 Haymarket 




»)- 



(Hea Soum 



160 Tremont Street 

Over Mosclcy 9 
Luncheon 

11-3 

Afternoon Tea 

3 .30-5 30 



LASELL LEAVES 




PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Receipts 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 PORTLAND ST., BOSTON 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for Price List of over 60 kinds 



Albert P. Smith 



Telephone Richmond 1647, 1648 



SMITH BROTHERS 
Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Tunbridge Creameries 



Established 1842 



Incorporated 1910 



Capital paid in $90.000 00 



SANDS, FURBER & CO., Inc. 

Commission Merchants 
Fruit and Produce 

Nos. 88, 90 and 92, 16 and 17 North Side 

Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

W. S. GLIDDEN, Pres. H. F. RICE, Vice-Pres. 

C. H. CUMMING, Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 

Telephone 1552 Richmond 



George C. Folsom 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 
400 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 



Collins & Fairbanks Co. 



EXCLUSIVE 

MILLINERY 

AND COATS 

FOR 

Young* Women 



383 Washington St., Boston 



Chrismas Cards 

Exceptionally Attractive 

The best engraved and hand-colored pro- 
ductions from 25 makers, U. S. and foreign 

from 5c to $1.00 

Private Greeting Cards should be ordered 
now to secure the best and avoid the rush 

CHRISTMAS GIFTS 

from 25c to $5.00 

Gifts that Expaess Individuality 

Christmas Stationery Boxes, Dies 

Fountain Pens. Calendars 



Stationers 
36 WEST ST. 



F. W. Davis & Co. 



Engravers 
BOSTON 



72 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS, 
HARRY T. MILLER - - Proprietor 

Steam Heat — Elevators Electric Light — Sun Parlor 

A select suburban hotel, catering to a dis- 
criminating clientele. Five minutes from 
Lasell Seminary. Transients accommodated. 
Terms reasonable. 

GO TO THE 

BOULEVARD PHARMACY 

(THE NEW DRUG STORE) 
FOR YOUR 

Ice Cream Sodas 

Toilet Articles, etc. 



EVERY THING FIRST CLASS 



m 

_4 SJi 



BOULEVARD PHARMACY 
2090 Commonwealth Avenue - Auburndale 




Whitney's has long been famous as a specialty 
store for beautiful linens of every description, for 
its many interesting novelties and its complete 
stocks, at all times, in household requisites. Our 
showing includes the best foreign and domestic 
goods in the following lines: 

TABLE LINENS ART EMBROIDERIES 

HANDKERCHIEFS VEILINGS HAMBURGS 

WHITE GOODS APRONS NECKWEAR 

UPHOLSTERIES RUGS BED FURNISHINGS 

AND ALSO 

PHILIPPINE HAND EMBROIDERED UNDERWEAR 



T. D. Whitney & Co. 

"Everything in Linens" 
Temple Place — West St. - Boston 





Ladies are delighted 

with the results of using Camp- 
bell's Stain on Floors, Furni- 
ture and Woodwork. 

Gives superb finish, brings out 
the natural grain of the wood. 
Write for color card 

Carpenter-Morton Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Established 1882 



Incorporated 1904 



GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costfumer* I 

6 Boylston Place, Boston, Mass. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Oxford 145 

C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 
JWuatc Bealcrg 

Announce their Removal to 
2B Park Street, Boston. Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Three doors above their old store. Send for our recent 
catalogues. Mail orders filled the same day as received. 
Music sent on selection if desired. 



Crockery 
China and Glass 



The undersigned invite attention to their exhibit in these lines 
which includes the best productions of the Potters' and Glass 
Makers' Art and gleaned by visits by our buyers to the 
best makers in Great Britain. France, Germany, Austria, Italy, 
Japan and America. 

WEDDING AND COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS 

Art Pottery 3rd Floor 

Glassware Department 2nd Floor 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 4th Floor 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 3rd Floor 

TOILET SETS AND LAMPS Gallery 

Jones, McDuffe & Stratton Co. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 

33 Franklin Street, Boston 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 



n 



i ^ 



P B! 



i f IP 






2|otel iPurttan 



390 Commonwealth Ave., near Massachusetts Ave. subway sta- 
tion, which is four minutes from cor. Tremont and Boylston streets, 
and all electric lines, between Auburndale and Boston and five 
minutes from the Back Bay depots. 

®f)e ©istmcttbe ponton i>ou*e 

A highly satisfactory hotel more than ordinarily desirable for ladies with wholly reasonable rates 
Your inquiries gladly answered. 

L. S. COSTELLO, Manager. 



As Boston's Premier Outfitters for 

Misses and Girls 

E. T. SLATTERY CO. specialize in the distinctively individual in young women's 
outer wear for College, School and Dress. Our fashions have their origin in the 
youthfulness of LAUVIN, the distingue of Callot, the originality of Cheruet, Daucet 
and other Paris designers, assuring our patrons of exclusiveness and still maintaining 
a policy of pleasingly moderate prices. 



W*j# 



Opposite Boston Common 

154-155-156-158 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 



BOSTON 
STUDIOS 

161 TREMONT ST. 
Tel. Ox. 858 

164 TREMONT ST. 
Te!. Ox. 2687 




530ST0N* 

T^HE distinctive individuality of our photo- 
*■ graphs will appeal to you. They repre- 
sent a wonderful advance in methods — and 
while the elements that enter into their pro- 
duction are the most expensive known in the 
Art of Photography, the cost will be to you 
will be no more than that of the indifferently 
made photograph. 

Your patronage is most cordially invited. 

Class photographs forJLasell Seminary j 



NEW YORK 
STUDIO 

306 FIFTH AVENUE 




LASELL LEAVES 



/f' 



73 




A 

Coming-out 
Announcement 

(~)UR new department, devoted ex- 
clusively to misses apparel, has 
just made its opening bow — and is 
already one of the most popular 
debutantes in the world of fashion. 
Our third floor is now given over 
to showing unusual styles and val- 
ues in misses apparel. 



Jf . $. ©'Connor Co. 

157 Fremont B>t, Boston 



New England's Leading Specialty Shop. — Suits — Gowns- 
Coats — Furs — Blouses — Neckwear — Hosiery 




*C/[~* ****&, 




J 



To the Students and Faculty 
of Lasell Seminary 

You are invited to use the Auburndale office of 
the Newton Trust Company whenever you find it 
convenient. We would like to carry an account 
for you on our ledgers — receiving deposits and 
cashing your checks any time during banking 
hours. It will be a convenient way of keeping 
your cash account. 

COURTESY IS OUR WATCHWORD 

Newton Trust Company 



Auburndale Office 

Hours 8-2. Sat. 8-12 



- 339 Auburn Street 

Tel. Newton North 2640 



74 



LASELL LEAVES 



AN OLD CARPET HOUSE 

FOR 98 YEARS we have been dealing in Floor 
Coverings, and today we are undoubtedly the 
best known Carpet and Rug House in New England 

We have more capital invested in Floor Coverings than any other con- 
cern in Boston, we show a much larger assortment and our prices are 
as low, if not lower, than elsewhere. 

We have customers in nearly every State in the Union, and many fami- 
lies have traded with us for several generations. 

FOR MANY YEARS WE HAVE SUPPLIED THE 
CARPETS USED IN LASELL SEMINARY. 

JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 

646 Washington St., Opposite Boylston St., Boston 



Meyer Jonasson & Go 



TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Waists, Shirts, Sweaters 

and furs 



GARMENTS FOR SEMINARY GIRLS 



A SPECIAL FEATURE 



|lS47) , 




THE NEW WALKING BOOT 

A New Model in Lace or Button in Dull Calf or Patent 
Leather with Cloth or Kid Top, Low Heels. Riding 
Boots and Dress Boots in many styles. 

10% cash discount to students and faculty of Lasell 
160 Tremont Street, Boston 



BtoEtL tpAVE5 



"DUX FEMINA FACTI 



Vol. XXXXI LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, BOSTON, MASS., DECEMBER, 1915 No. 3 

Published Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 









LIST OF OFFICERS 






Business 


Manager 




Subscription Editor 




JESSIE SHEPHERD 




JESSIE SHEPHERD 








Editor-in-chief 


Assistant Subscription Editor 








CAROL RICE 


MARGARET POWELL 








Art Editor 




Local Editor 






CHARLOTTE WHITING 


Exchange Editor 


MAUDE HAYDEN 






Persona JEditor 
HELEN MERRILL 


ADOLPHIA GARNSEY 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (Including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 





Literarv 


CONTENTS 

86 


87 

91 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Champlain Studios Inside front cover 

Thomas Long Inside front cover 

F. P. O'Connor Co 73 

Newton Trust Co 73 

T. E. Moseley Co 74 

Meyer Jonasson & Co 74 

John H. Pray & Sons Co 74 

Collins & Fairbanks 93 

Boston Music Co 101 

P. P. Adams 101 

Pinkham & Smith 101 

Lasell Inn 101 

A. T. Bridges 102 

Smith Bros 102 

Sands Furber 102 

F. W. Davis 102 

George C. Folsom 102 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton 102 

Chandler & Co 103 

Angus & Clark 103 

Kornfeld 103 

Jordan Marsh Co 104 



Thayer McNeil Co 104 

C. H. Hovey & Co 104 

Wellesley Inn 105 

Delicatessen Store 105 

Capodanno & Albano 105 

Hayden 105 

Houghton Gorney Co 105 and 107 

English Tea Room 106 

A. Shuman & Co 106 

Damon 106 

H. S. Lombard 106 

Hill Smith & Co 108 

Thorndike & Stolar 108 

Boulevard Pharmacy 108 

Carpenter. Morton 108 

George P. Raymond 108 

Woodland Park Hotel 108 

T. D. Whitney 108 

C. W. Thompson 108 

Hotel Puritan Inside back cover 

E. T. Slattery Inside back cover 





CUSHMAN HALL 



CARPENTER HALL 







■ v'-'.^v ' \ ■'. ■;.. 



PRINCIPAL'S RESIDENCE 





BANCROFT HOUSE 



GARDENER HALL 



Mimm 



THE MOUSE IN THE BASKET 

Mr. Teeny Gray Mouse peered fearfully 
forth and scuttled silently from his warm 
hole, like a silver streak across the moonlit 
floor, and up the precipitous, creaking side 
of the waste-basket. Safe in the deepest re- 
cesses of this temporary haven, he nibbled 
gaily at a bit of very delicious candy, making 
as little noise as possible, for in this dangerous 
undertaking he had been repeatedly warned 
by Mrs. Teeny Gray Mouse against humans. 
It surely seemed almost impossible to man- 
oeuver in such crackling mountains of paper 
without awakening suspicion as to his ex- 
istence, and how was he to take home part of 
this sweet crumb to Mrs. Teeny Gray Mouse 
and all the teeniest gray mousies? Of course, 
it was only a flash across the room but in the 
time it would take to drag the big crumb over 
the floor, such dreadful things migh t 
happen! 

Meanwhile he had left this tempting morsel 
and explored a little further in the basket. 
There were such possibilities open to a brave 
adventurous mouse. But suddenly rash 
Mr. Mouse was very much assured of the 
dreadful things which might happen, for 
his adventurous search was interrupted by a 
great noise that made his teeny little heart 
stop still under his gray velvet jacket. He 
had heard such frightful sounds before,— 
one night when he and Mrs. Teeny Gray 
Mouse had celebrated their honeymoon in 
the cane wastebasket and in their joyousness 
had squeaked their appreciation of the deli- 
cate repast of cake-crumbs a little too loudly. 
Then a great object had been hurled from space 



against the basket and as the thing toppled 
over, the festive pair had escaped in shudder- 
ing fear. 

These sounds too had an undeniable threat 
in them, they were so angry and harsh. 

Tonight there was a new sound, — a shriek 
that seemed like a crowd of noises all talking 
at once. What could it mean? The Teeny 
Gray Mouse cowered in abject terror and 
nearly died of fright while the sounds came 
nearer and the basket shook in sympathy 
with its little inmate. 

Between the mounds of paper streamed 
blinding flashes of light, and the Teeny Gray 
Mouse thought his end had surely come. 
Though for a moment he was in comparative 
darkness and he blinked up into the lighted 
room. A Great Creature stood over the 

basket and the heavy terrible sounds came 
from It! Suddenly the basket began to rise 
and the Teeny Gray Mouse shut his eyes and 
thought of the hungry mouse-babies at home, 
but as suddenly the basket was lowered and 
landed with a great thud somewhere; the 
big noise rumbled away and a door slammed 
in the stillness. 

After hours and hours of timid suspense the 
Teeny Gray Mouse ventured to climb up to 
the rim of the basket and peered around in the 
gloom. The coast was clear; so away he 
scampered along the walls in search of a path 
home. That night the wee mousies were 
hungry, but Mrs. Teeny Gray Mouse did 
not scold her spouse, for his adventure had 
been far too exciting and she had nearly been 
left alone in the world with the five wee 
mousies to support. 



78 



LASELL LEAVES 



A VICTROLA 

Every year since Dick Southwick had left 
his small home town to start in business in a 
not far-distant city he had come home at 
Christmas and brought something to brighten 
the rather monotonous life of his parents and 
young sister. Now as Christmas drew near 
he spent a great deal of time thinking what 
he would give them this year. 

One snowy afternoon Dick started out on 
his quest. He wandered aimlessly along 
looking in windows which were filled with 
bright masses of red and green, but he saw 
nothing in them which suited his purpose in 
the least. It was always rather difficult to 
find one gift which all three people would 
enjoy but this year it seemed almost im- 
possible. He stopped in various stores and 
purchased small individual gifts but, try hard 
as he could, the "big" one seemed to elude 
him. Suddenly a large poster in a music 
store window caught his eye. "Hear The 
Best Christmas Hymns Sung by the Best 
Choirs in Your Own Home." 

The rest of the window was filled with 
victrolas, Edisons, and Columbias of dif- 
ferent styles, sizes and shapes. Instantly he 
remembered his father's love for good church 
music, his mother's fondness for the old 
tunes, and the insistent demand of his young 
sister for "ragtime." "A victrola;" he thought, 
''the very thing. How they will enjoy it!" and 
entering the store he ordered a handsome 
mahogony victrola to be sent to his home in 
time for Christmas. Then he made a careful 
selection of records of different kinds to be 
sent with the victrola for trial. 

A week later while on his way home he 
could not help thinking with pleasure of his 
selection. He could fairly see the happy glow 
on his mother's face when Alma Gluck sang 
"Swanee River" to Zimbalist's humoresque 
accompaniment, could hear his Father 
humming "Hark the Herald Angels Sing", 
and could see his sister gaily dancing around 
the room to the "Gems from 'Watch Your 
Step.' He wondered a little if the machine 



would be there on time. The firm had as- 
sured him that a week would be long enough 
and so little time was spent in worry. 

His sister met him at the train and before 
they started on their walk through the 
fast darkening streets, he left her for a minute 
to run into the freight office and inquire if 
there was a package for him. 

"Not yet," said the frieght agent, but one 
of the cars from B — has been delayed and we 
are expecting it to-morrow. Shall we send 
the team around with the package, Mr. 
Southwick?" 

"Yes, please," answered Dick, "as soon as 
it comes." 

Then he joined Mary for the pleasant walk 
home. She asked him if he had brought her 
any new music before she asked him how he 
was; but he only smiled and said "Wait." 

The next day was a busy one. Dick and 
Bob, the hired man, spent nearly the entire 
morning in selecting a tree suitable for the 
gifts on Christmas morning. In the after- 
noon, as the skating was perfect, he and Mary 
joined a party in a skate up river and when he 
finally realized that his victrola had not come 
it was too late to find out about it, for in this 
small town the freight office closes early, even 
at Christmas.' 

"It will come to-morrow," he reassured 
himself and without another thought about 
it gaily escorted Mary to the "movies." 

Christmas morning was bright and gay. 
After opening the small gifts Dick explained 
why his family gift was not there but 
he would not tell them what it was. While 
they were eating breakfast there was a loud 
knock at the door. When Mary ran to open it 
there on the porch stood the freight agent 
with two medium sized boxes. 

"Oh, Dick!" she cried, "Here it is! Here it 
is!" 

At that the entire family hurried to the 
door. "Oh, no," Dick said. "It can't be, 
these boxes are too small." 

But suddenly he spied a label "Bailey's 
Music Rooms." "What under the sun," he 



LASELL LEAVES 



79 



muttered and dragging the boxes into the 
house he tore the hoards from one. Inside was 
a talking machine but no one could call it a 
victrola. Instead of the latest mahogany 
case there was a small oak one of ancient 
make. It even had a horn and worse still 
a horn with painted roses on it. Dick 
groaned but soon his sense of humor came to 
the rescue and he began to laugh. Then he 
opened the other box and found records vary- 
ing from "Pony Boy" to "Silver Threads 
Among the Gold." As he explained to the 
family they realized that the mistake was only 
one of the many made in the Christmas rush 
and though somewhat disappointed they 
laughed with him. 

Not much time was spent that day in 
listening to the "victrola" but when Dick, 
returned to B — the matter was fixed up. 
Although he has not been home since the real 
victrola arrived, enthusiastic letters from 
all three members of the family make him 
believe that his Christmas gift, though some- 
what delayed, has proved satisfactory. 



THAT LETTER 

{Continued from the November Leaves) 

Dearest Bud, — 

I will break it gently, Bud. Now really, 
dear, I couldn't help it. Besides it wasn't 
under my control anyway. What I mean is 
this — in plain words — I am unexectedly and 
unavoidably called back to Montana. There 
is nothing to do but go or I certainly wouldn't 
think of it for a minute. I will write as soon 
as I know when I can come back. 

Hastily, 
Barbara Ransom. 

This was the note Bud received on the 
evening of the 30th not long after he had re- 
turned from escorting his bride to her hotel. 
"Well, if that isn't the_ .limit! Here's 

my wife gone west on our wedding day — and 
I don't even know what she looks like. Gee, 
I'm going to write to her and find out what 
she means by such actions. I'll make Rex 



think I have, at least, and turn the joke on 
him. I'll make him. take his own medicine." 

A half an hour later Rex came into the 
room and found Bud busily writing. "I 
say, old fellow, which one is it now? The one 
with the blue hair and golden eyes or " 

"For heaven's sake, Rex, shut-up, will you, 
while I finish this letter? I'm writing to my 
wife, if you want to know. Do you know what 
that woman has done? Gone west! And, 
if you would believe it, I don't even know 
what she looks like. If she intends to live 
at the other end of the earth, I want her pic- 
ture at least and I am writing for it. Of course 
we want to keep our marriage secret for a 
time so I am addressing the letter to Barbara 
Boyce, her — ahem! — maiden name." 

Rex staggered and put his hand to his head, 
dazed. "A nice mess I'll be in if cousin Bar- 
bara ever gets that letter. She will know for 
sure I had something to do with it. What 
under the canopy shall I do now?" he said to 
himself. 

"S ay say Bud, don't you 

want me to post your letter for you? I am 

going right down to the post-office and__ 

and you know it will go much 

quicker than if you mailed it here at the 
dorm. I_ _I_ 

"No thanks, my dear boy, I prefer to mail 
my own letters, those to my wife especially. 
I can't risk having my little friends bring 
about any marital troubles. I have enough 
now." 

"But Bud, you haven't time to go down 
town this morning, you know you haven't. 
You_ 

"My dear Rex, if you will just stop and 
think you will find that this is my easy morn- 
ing. Where were you last night that your 
memory appears so disordered this fine 
morning? If you will please bring to light 
that stamp box you are reposing on I will 
thank you very much and maybe if you are a 
good little youngster, I will graciously invite 
you to accompany me to the honorable post- 
office." 



80 



LASELL LEAVES 



"Bud Ransom, I should think there was some- 
thing the matter with you if you didn't sling 
sarcasm two-thirds of the time. I now con- 
sider that I have been invited to attend the 
Honorable Mr. Ransom on his post-office- 
ward way and shall accept the invitation." 

When they reached the post-office Rex 
mumbled something to Bud and disappeared 
in the telegraph office. Soon the instrument 
was merrily clicking these words, — 
"Miss Barbara Boyce, 

Irvington, Montana. 

Start for East at once. Urgent reason. 
Don't be alarmed. Will explain later. 

Rex." 

A week later if one had been near the gate 
of track eight in the great terminal station in 
New York, one might have seen an extremely 
bewitching young lady being hurried to the 
row of taxis by a tall, husky fellow who was 
carrying her handluggage. "To the Biltmore! 
he flung at the driver and bundled his com- 
panion hurriedly into the taxi. 

"For mercy's sake Rex, will you please 
explain this queer conduct? I wasn't going 
to start until the last of next week but when 
I got your telegram I packed off as soon as I 
possibly could. Mother is going to send ray 
trunk later. Tell me quick, is there anything 
the matter with Aunt Alice or Uncle Bob, 
Rex?" 

It is not necessary for us to follow Rex's 
explanation for we knew it long ago. At the 
end he added, "But Barbs, as he is my chum 
he will have to meet you sooner or later so I 
have arranged to have him attend a party 
to-morrow evening with the family. I am 
scared stiff that he will put two and two 
together and make it embarrassing for you. 
Still, it will have to come some time and I 
believe in getting the worst over with." 

Just as they entered the hotel, Barbara 
turned to her tall cousin and, looking up at 
him with a roguish twinkle in her eyes said, 
"Well, Rex, I guess this is going to be quite 
an exciting visit!" That was all — but it was 
sufficient to startle Rex. 



"Barbs, may I present my chum, Mr. 
Robert Ransom; this is my cousin, Miss Bar- 
bara Boyce of Irvington, Montana." 

"I am delighted to meet you, Miss Boyce. 
If I heard aright I understand that you come 
from Irvington, Montana. If that is so we 
shall have something in common as I have a 
friend in Irvington. Her name is strangely 
like yours." 

Barbara glanced at Rex just in time to see 
him give a nervous start at Bud's words. Be- 
fore he could recover himself Bud was say- 
ing, "May I have the pleasure of this dance, 
Miss Boyce?" and he was left standing alone. 

This was but the beginning of many good 
times that Barbara and Bud had together. 
As time went on Bud was more and more 
attracted by the charms of his chum's allur- 
ing cousin. Gradually this attraction grew 
into something deeper. He found himself 
falling in love with her! At last he couldn't 
stand it any longer and went to his friend and 
confident, Rex. 

"Say, Rex, old fellow, I'm in trouble. I 
have simply got to get someone's advice. 
May I unburden myself to you?" At Rex's 
earnest assent he went on to tell his story. 
"And, Oh Rex, I do love Barbara so that I am 
willing to do anything to " 

"Bud! Bud! Say, but I'm glad! Do you 
know, Robert Ransom, that nothing could 
happen that could please me any more?" 

Bud, who was sitting with his head de- 
jectedly leaning against his chum's desk, 
looked up for a moment and said with a wan 
smile, "Thanks, old man. I am glad to hear 
you say that. It helps me a lot." 

"For heaven's sake, man, why all are you 
you so downcast? What is the trouble? 
There is no obstacle now that I can see." 

"Well, Rex, you are making a great mis- 
take this time. There is about as huge an 
obstacle as there possibly could be. You know 

I have a wife already. I for heaven's 

sake, I don't see the joke " 

"A great burst of laughter from Rex was 
the cause of this last irrevelant remark. 



LASELL LEAVES 



81 



"Ha-ha-ha! Ha-ha-ha!" 

"Have a heart and tell a fellow the joke. 
I'm sure I don't see any. It looks like any- 
thing but a joke to me!" 

"Gee, Bud, that sure is a good one. As 
matters have come to such a pass I am at 
liberty to explain a few things to you. Let 
your thoughts go back to November 30th. 
for a few minutes. As you think it over can't 
you see that the whole thing was not carried 
on in the usual way? Where was the license? 
How could it have been obtained without 
any of the usual ceremony? Why was the door 
locked?" 

"You've got me. I was so blooming fussed 
that I couldn't pay much attention to details. 
I was a fool to get into it anyway." 

"Well, to make a long story short, the whole 
thing was for your initiation. To begin with 
/ wrote the letter, the bride was Bill and Bob 
was the minister. Why, what is the trouble 
now?" 

''Rex Robinson, what can your cousin think 
of me? Only think of that crazy letter I 
wrote when I asked for her picture! Good 

heaven's, man, she must think I am well 

I don't know what. If I had known that I 
surely wouldn't have had the courage to face 
her. How could you let me go on?" 

"What was the use? She never got the 
letter. She " 

"Never received the letter!" 

"No, I telegraphed to her, to come at once, 
that same morning that you mailed that 
letter. She wasn't coming until a whole week 
later but I couldn't let her get that letter so I 
sent for her to come earlier. You see there 
was no chance to write and explain the whole 
matter before she got your letter so I got 
desperate." 

Bud's low surpressed chuckle at last burst- 
ing into uncontrollable laughter interrupted 
his friend's most fluent explanation. 

"Well, what is the matter now? A min- 
ute ago you were almost in tears and here 
you are now at the other extreme!" 



"Say, Rex, but that is rich!" Bud exclaimed, 
slapping his knee in high glee. "Well, you'll 
have to own yourself beaten at your own game 
this time. I suspected the joke from the very 
first and I've only been stringing you along 
all the time." 

At this point a crowd of frat brothers burst 
into the room. Rex, who was at first inclined 
to be angry, at last gave way to his natural 
good spirits and pulled Bud to his feet, yelling 
exultantly, "Fellows, congratulations are in 
order. Permit me to introduce my future 
cousin-in-law. Our good old friend, Bud 
Ransom, is going to marry my cousin, Miss 
Barbara Boyce of Irvington, Montana.'" What 
momentous consequences a mere letter may 
lead to — sometimes! 

Helen N. Howe, 1917. 





LASELL 11— MELROSE 6 

Friday afternoon, November 12, Lasell 
won her second victory over Melrose. The 
Lasell line-up was as follows. 

Forwards — Gertrude Allen, Orissa Attwill. 

Jumping Center — Carol Rice. 

Side center — Mildred Cloake. 

Guards — Dorothy Mathias, Edith Hob- 
son. 

This time Melrose had her full team on 
hand and the team-work showed much 
practice since the previous game. Mean- 
while our girls too had not been idle, so that 
they exhibited some excellent passing and 
goal-throwing. The game ended with a 
score of 11-6. 

Manager Mabel Straker has arranged for 
a game with Thayer Academy on January 15, 
and we are hoping for still other games later 
on. 



To the tune of "Down on the Erie" 
Here's to the Seniors, 
Our sister class. 

We assure you that we love you, 
And will always try to please you. 
Good old 1916, 
It's the best class here of all, 
And we'll stick by you forever, 
This class of '18. 



To the tune of "Kentucky Jubilee'" 
We've got a sneaky feeling in our hearts 
That we are awfully slow; 
But at last we're here 
To tell you all that we love you all, 
If you will lend us just a friendly ear. 
We'll tell you now why we're here. 
Can't you see it? Can't you see it? 
It's just a token of our love and 
Now we pray you'll forgive us 
All that's past. 

O here's to you! O here's to you! 
Our Senior Sister Class. 



Tuesday evening, November 9, the Sopho- 
mores serenaded the Seniors. After singing 
their songs outside, they went in and presented 
each Senior and the house teachers with a 
box of ice-cream and some cakes. This was 
very thoughtful and the Seniors certainly 
appreciated it. Following are the Sopho- 
mores' songs: 



Sung to "Tulip Time in Holland." 

Dear Seniors, now we say good-night, 
We hope that you have enjoyed all, 
We hope that we have done alright, 
In making you this short call. 
Did everything tasce good to you? 
We hope it did, for we meant it to, 
And now with just a tiny sigh, 
We say good-night to you. 



The following morning in chapel the Senior 

thanked the Sophs by singing: — 
Sophomores, Sophomores, 
We thank you for your splendid song 
Fairest maids, your serenades 
Straight into our hearts have made their way. 
We love you, 
Sisters true, 



Continued on page 100; 



LASELL LEAVES 



83 



The best class of them all, 
19 IS, Sisters, once more 
We all thank you. 

Then they warned the Juniors not to repeat 

their interference with the Sophomores' plans 

again in the following song: — 
With all respect and due etiquette 
We think you're mighty queer 
1917, you Juniors, where have your manners gone 

this year? 
If you think you're very smart, 
You sure have fooled yourselves, 
Now remember, 1917, 

Don't interfere again! 
Honk! Honk! 



CAMBRIDGE TRIP 

At noon on November 8 a party of nine- 
teen girls chaperoned by Miss Rand left 
for Cambridge in a barge. The first object of 
interest which we passed on our way was a 




monument marking the birthplace of Paul 
Revere, in Watertown. At Mt. Auburn 
Cemetery we left the barge and walked 
through the grounds. We saw the graves of 
many noted people. Among them were those 
of Longfellow, James Russell Lowell, Robert 
Shaw, Phillips Brooks, and Mrs. Julia Ward 
Howe. 

On the way to Harvard we saw the homes 
of Longfellow and James Russell Lowell. At 
Harvard we visited the Germanic Museum, 
the dining room and the kitchen of Memorial 
Hall, Saunders Theatre, the gym and last 
but not least the Agassiz Museum where the 
glass flowers are exhibited. 



Saturday morning, November 20, the 
Seniors took their class pins in chapel. At 
Mildred Cloake's signal, after Miss Potter 
had given the notices, the girls gathered 
around the piano, and holding their class 
pins up, sang: — 

Our little class pins, emblems of wisdom, 
Dear to the hearts of the Blue and the Gold 
Seniors all cherish you, to you we'll e'er be true, 
Tokens so longed for and worked for, we now have 

gained. 
To us you will recall days spent in shelt'ring halls 
Of dear Lasell, Alma Mater, 
You are the pride of the class of '16, 
Dear little class pins of ours. 

Then, not wishing to slight our wide-awake 

Junior class, they sang to them:— 

Did you ever hear the saying 

"Slower than cold molasses?" 
It applies, it applies to our Junior class so wise, 
They surely take the cake 
When it comes to trusting fate, 
Never worry, never hurry, never scurry till too late 
Oh, that Junior class is inexpressible! 



LONGFELLOW'S HOME 



SOPHOMORE— SENIOR PARTY 

Tuesday evening, November 23, as the 
Seniors entered Gardner Hall after dinner, an 
attractive poster fastened to the mantlepiece 
met their eyes. On it were the following 

lines : — 

The Class of '18 sends greetings to 
The Class of '16, and invites them to 
A Dance to be given in their honor in 
The Lasell Gym at 7.30 P. M., 
Sat., Nov. 27. 



84 



LASELL LEAVES 



The Seniors could hardly wait until the end 
of the week. When the great evening arrived, 
it found Sophomores and Seniors arrayed in 
dainty gowns of every conceivable shade in 
the gymnasium which was artistically deco- 
rated with banners and pennants, while green 
screens around the walls hid the useful but 
not ornamental gym apparatus. Several 
inviting cozy corners offered a comfortable 
resting-place between dances. The orches- 
tra now playing a lively one-step or 
fox-trot and now a dreamy hesitation, made 
them feel like dancing on for hours and 
hours. 

Between the fifth and sixth dances, de- 
licious fruit punch and little cakes were served. 
After this agreeable interruption, the dancing 
continued until quarter of ten. Then, while 
the orchestra was preparing to leave, the 
Seniors sang to their beloved sister class. 



The night before our Thanksgiving recess 
began, upon the Seniors' return from 
dinner, they were surprised to spy reposing on 
the center table in Gardner, a beautiful turkey 
tied with green and white ribbons, and sur- 
rounded by fifty-two tiny wax pumpkins tied 
with blue and gold ribbon. Upon investiga- 
tion, the little pumpkins were found to con- 
tain green and white candies, while the turkey 
contained some of the same candies and nuts 
of all kinds. The turkey's gay decoration as 
well as the tints of the candy made known to 
us whom we were to thank for this most origi- 
nal surprise. The following morning at 
breakfast the Seniors sang: 

We thank you, Specials, for your gift; 

The Seniors think it mighty fine. 

You certainly were very thoughtful. 

We will ever think of you. 

Green and white will always be 

True to the gold and blue. 

Now, once more we thank you, Specials, 

Dear class so true. 



at Lasell. After the delicious dinner they 
played games in the gym for over an hour. 
The appropriate lines on Thanksgiving below 
were printed on the menus. 

"For morning sun and evening dew, 
For every bud that April knew, 
For storm and silence, gloom and light, 
And for the solemn stars at night; 
For fallow field and burdened lyre, 
For roof-tree and the hearth-side fire; 
For every thing that shines and sings, 

For dear, familiar daily things 

The friendly trees, and in the sky, 
The white cloud-squadrons sailing by; 
For Hope that waits, for Faith that dares, 
For Patience that still smiles and bears, 
For Love that fails not, nor withstands; 
For healing touch of children's hands, 
For happy labor, high intent, 
For all life's blessed sacrament. 
O Comrade of our nights and days, 
Thou givest all things, take our praise!" 

— Arthur Ketchum. 



Dr. Vincent's lecture, on "Balzac," which 
we had the pleasure of hearing on Wednes- 
day evening, November 10, proved to be 
the most interesting of his course. We are 
all sorry that Dr. Vincent will not be with 
us until another year. 



Thursday afternoon, November 11, Miss 
Richmond of the Newton Hospital gave us an 
instructive talk on how to make a bed proper- 
ly. She added a few fundamental facts 
of personal hygiene. After her lecture 
she obligingly answered the girls' ques- 
tions. 



About sixty of our girls and their guests 
spent a very enjoyable Thanksgiving day here 



On Thursday afternoon, November 18, 
we had the pleasure of hearing a very enter- 
taining and enlightening lecture on the 
American Indian by Mrs. Marie E. Ives 
Humphrey, president of the American In- 
dian League, supplemented by some weird 
Indian songs rendered by her husband, Rev. 
William Brewster Humphrey. Mrs. Humph- 
rey told us how the Indian woman weaves a 
story into every basket she makes, and how 
one never finds two baskets with the same 
pattern. After the lecture, many attractive 



LASELL LEAVES 



85 



baskets, Navajo bracelets, and articles of 
beadwork were on sale until five o'clock. 



On November 7, Professor Marshall Perrin 
of Boston University led the Vesper Service. 
He presented the thought that it is not nec- 
essary to sow wild oats to get experience and 
that in the long run, even mistakes are of 
no especial value. 

Mrs. Douglas of Brookline gave us a very 
helpful message at the Vesper Service of Nov. 
14. Her subject was "The Sheep of the 
Fold." She said she wished to leave this 
thought with us if she left no other, that 
we are the only bibles some people read and 
that for that reason we must be very care- 
ful to give the right message when we meet 
other members of the fold. 

The Vesper Service of Nov. 21 was led by 
Mrs. Brown of the Home Missions Society. 
Her subject was "Tithing" or "God's Tenth." 
After explaining the origin of "tithes," Mrs. 
Brown told us among other things that if every 
Christian in America would pay his tenth in- 
to God's treasury, the whole world could be 
evangelized in a generation. 

On Nov. 28 we attended the Union Service 
at the Congregational Church at which Mr. 
Davidson, President of the Dover Street 
Mission, presided. Besides his very stirring 
talk, in which he told us of the fine work 
the Mission is carrying on, stories of re- 
markable conversions to a better life were 
given by several of the men from that 
Mission. 



On November 8 one of our best Christian 
Endeavor meetings was led by Margaret 
Jones on the topic, "Know Thyself." 

Beulah Coward led an interesting meet- 
ong on November 15. Her topic was "A 
Happy Day." 

Christian Endeavor was led on November 
22 by Helen Overholser. Her practical talk 
was based on the verse, "Even so the tong u 
is a little member and boasteth great thinge 



Behold, how great a matter a little fire kind- 
leth." 

On November 29, Miss Packard gave us 
many inspiring ideas in her Christmas mess- 
age on "Following the Star." 



The innovation of having one musical 
chapel exercise a week has met with great 
favor. It is to be hoped that Mr. George 
Dunham will continue to favor us occasionally 
with these delightful fifteen-minute organ 
recitals. 





I 



■ i 




MAE CHAN 
Our schoolmate from far away China 




DITOWA 




Again a plea for more help on the Leaves 
work. The interest, we are sorry to say, is 
now sadly lagging and enthusiasm must be 
had through the whole year to make the paper 
a go. There are a great many concerts, 
important trips, and lectures which the Local 
Editors cannot possibly attend and they de- 
pend on you, the girls of the school, to help 
them write those up. Won't you give just 
some of your time to do it? We can appreciate 
as well as any what it means to have work 
but it would take only thirty or forty min- 
utes of the time which we all have free, to sit 
down and write something for the Leaves. 

Where are those jokes? We know that 
there are many for we hear girls say, "Oh, 
the funniest thing happened in class just 
now." When asked to write it down, they 
promise faithfully to do so but when it comes 
time to make the proof there are so few that 
we know they haven't done it. 

When called for in the English classes, good 
short stories are handed in. Won't you please 
write some for the Leaves'? We need them 
badly. 

We are sure that all want our school paper 
to do us credit, but everyone must help. 



Christmas is over now and all of the festivi- 
ties, the shop and house decorations and the 
prevailing excitement which helped to remind 
us of the glad season are gone. Because of 
this, we shall have to train ourselves to 
continue the Christmas spirit without the 
Christmas environment. Probably all will 
agree that now, as always, Christmas day 
means one on which we try to make others 
happy; perhaps by gifts to our friends, by a 
basket to a poor family, or by words of en- 
couragement. Well, that is just what we 
must plan to do every day of the new year, 
try to make people happy. We can all think 
of numerous ways in which to do this, an 
appreciative word, a pleasant smile, or some 
kind deed. Think of how much better we would 
feel ourselves and of how much the school 
day would gain if each would do her best to 
bring good cheer to somebody. How wonder- 
ful it would be to have every day of 1916 
a Christmas Day. 



"Thy own wish wish I thee in every place," 

The Christmas joy, the song, the feast, the cheer, 

Thine be the light of love in every face 

That looks on thee, to bless thy coming year. 




Among the latest Lasell winter weddings 
we have pleasure in announcing the fol- 
lowing : 

On Tuesday, November 23, occurred the 
marriage of Blanche Elizabeth Gardner, 1900, 
to Dr. Clarence N. Peeler at Wilkes Barre, 
Pa. Dr. and Mrs. Peeler are at home at Char- 
lotte, N. C, after the first of January. 

Novem.ber 24, Ruth Barbara Maurer be- 
came Mrs. James Luginbuhl at Dunellen, 

X- J- 

Gladys Goodman and Mr. Francis Ed- 
ward Stern married on Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 24, at Hartford, Conn. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stern at home at Mendota Cottage, Rye, 
N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Brix announce the 
marriage of their daughter, Myrtle Alvina, 
'15, to Mr. Henry Philip Buehner, on Wed- 
nesday, December 15, at Portland, Oregon. 

Wedding bells unite with Christmas bells 
in ringing out joyous congratulations to these 
fair brides and grooms! 

A dainty card has been received announc- 
ing the engagement of Miss Dorothy Baker 
Smith to Mr. Daniel Sawin Tolman. 

We also have pleasure in announcing the 



engagement of Marion Ordway, '11, to Mr. 
J. Dean Corley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Harris announce the 
betrothal of their daughter Amalia Marion 
to Mr. Jacob Leon Isaacs. 

No one could receive a heartier welcome to 
Lasell than Martha Schumann, '15. She cer- 
tainly is looking well and seems to be en- 
joying the "Village Street School" of her own 
town. Martha is giving her services for 
these needy children. 

We had recently a visit from Genevieve 
Mary Bettcher, '14, who is at present a 
regular domestic science instructor in a New 
Haven, Conn., school. 

Lasell misses the friendly presence of Mrs. 
Eva H. Little, the friend of the Misses 
Morgenthaler, whom we had hoped to keep 
with us indefinitely. However, she has left 
her niece Miss Hageman with us and we are 
thankful to have some hold on this new friend. 

Grace Harvey Hall, '11, sends, along with 
her subscription to the Leaves, congratulations 
to Doctor and Mrs. Winslow on the advent 
of little Priscilla and also gives a compliment 
to our school paper. The most attractive 
part of her letter was a "moving" picture of 



88 



LASELL LEAVES 



her little son taken on the lawn. We are 
grateful for every friendly word of her message. 

Josephine Kenower, '14, writes, "The 
visit of the Leaves is always a joy." She 
prophesies that little Priscilla will be a 
sweet bluebird in our Principal's family. 
Her prophecy is already coming true. She 
also writes, "Have just returned from a 
week's stay in Marion attending Cecelia 
Smith's pre-nuptial and wedding festivities 
and am now planning for the holidays at 
Austin for Helen Baird's, '14, wedding — 
all these splendid friendships a result or con- 
tinuation of our associations at our dear 
"Alma Mater." 

Miss Mary A. Mullikin, head of our Art 
Department, has had recently a fine exhibi- 
tion of paintings at the Twentieth Century 
Club, Boston. A large number of our Art 
students had the privilege of visiting this 
collection under the guidance of their popular 
teacher. 

Irene Stroh of the Michigan Lasell Club 
sends a cordial message to Doctor Winslow 
and we take the privilege of quoting from it. 
We had hoped for a later account of 
this interesting meeting, which is in the next 
column, but we are grateful for this fore- 
word from Irene: "The Committee for 
the Michigan Lasell Club luncheon, join 
me in thanking you for your kindness in 
sending the very attractive postal cards of 
Lasell. Nearly all of them were sent to 
various parts of Michigan so we are living in 
hopes of having a goodly representation. We 
had great hopes of having you with us at our 
luncheon and were disappointed on hearing 
of your inability to attend. The Leaves also 
is brimming over with entertaining facts, con- 
sequently all the girls will be well informed on 
everything concerning Lasell at present." 
(A unique idea of summoning the girls to 
their annual luncheon on real Lasell postals) . 

A dainty card announcing the arrival of 
Edward William Peeples November 15, has 
been received. This is the son of our May 
Thielens Peeples. 



Also, on December first a little daughter 
Jane Potter McConn was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Eugene McConn (Mary Potter, '05). 

Margaretha Henning sends a list of Lasell 
girls who attended the Michigan reunion at 
Detroit. In her letter to our Principal she 
writes "There were sixteen present at the 
gathering held this year. Marion Jackson, 
Mrs. N. J. Berston (Lucy A. Aldrich, '10), 
Flint, Mich., Margrethe Bauman, '15, 
Grayling, Mich., Miss N. Greenwood, Muir, 
Mich., Mrs. C. J. Phillips (Maude A. Parks), 
Toledo, Mich., Mrs. Marion MacKenzie, Ann 
Arbor, Mich., Lurella Krentler, Cora A. Nich- 
olson, Mrs. A. E. Cole, Mrs. Arew Greider, 
Mrs. W. E. Knight (Ella A. Puchta, '10), 
Mrs. A. O. Dunk (Edith V. Watkins) , Irene 
Stroh and Mrs. Robbins and myself from 
Detroit, Mich., Jennie A. Hamilton, '04, 
from Port Huron, Mich., We had a 
lovely time and after the luncheon had our 
business meeting, electing the following new 
officers — Mrs. A. O. Dunk, president; Marion 
MacKenzie, vice-president, and myself, sec- 
retary and treasurer. We have decided in the 
future to have our annual luncheon on the 
Saturday before Thanksgiving at the College 
Club. We talked over the good times at 
Lasell and all expressed the desire to have the 
privilege of returning for a visit before long." 

We are grateful to Margaretha for this 
most interesting Michigan Lasell news. 

Evelyn Schmidt, '14, proves a neighborly 
neighbor! We venture to quote a passage 
or two from her last word to Lasell. She 
writes, "It is not only habit (as Professor 
Perrin said at vespers at Lasell) which 
prompts me to write to you, but also because 
I'm chuck full of happiness because of the 
delightful time I had with you all this week 
end. I wonder if the girls in school love and 
appreciate Lasell as the old girls, who say it 
does them good to come back to see the 
school because you seem truly glad to see us. 
And how glad we are to see you!" 

Edith Harris Seward writes recently that 
her niece whom she had hoped would be a 



LASELL LEAVES 



89 



Lasell girl has decided to remain nearer home 
and is at the Emma Willard school. Louise 
Gurley Betts who sat next to me in chapel 
at Lasell, is mothering my niece while she 
is at the Emma Willard School." 

Fern Dixon Leahy, '07, reports herself 
and Virginia as well and happy and ex- 
presses her appreciation of the courtesy of 
Dr. and Mrs. Winslow in sending the at- 
tractive baby book. 

Annie Crowe Collum's, '09, latest address 
is 3 X. Artillery Mansions, 75 Victoria St., 
London, S. W., England. She is always 
happy to receive word from her old Lasell 
friends. Her husband is still on the firing 
line. 

Helen E. Carter, '07, sends a word of 
appreciation to Miss Witherbee. She seems 
to be enjoying her business career, reports 
the Chicago Lasell Luncheon as a great suc- 
cess and the largest number ever attending. 
She declares that the splendid letters from 
Lasell were the principal attraction. 

Agnes Adelsdorf Strauss, '12, kept her 
promise to visit Lasell. She came all the 
way from Nashville, Tenn., to attend the 
Harvard Yale Football Game and also on the 
part of Mr. Strauss to attend to business. 
Agnes left with us an attractive picture of 
herself and her little son, John Alex- 
ander. 

Ida Mallory Lyon, '03, writes an interesting 
letter to Miss Witherbee which we would be 
pleased to quote in full but we must deny 
ourselves. In speaking of Mademoisell's 
recent visit to France she writes, "Dauntless 
Mademoiselle, there are many like her in 
these days and in our hearts we honor them 
all." She declares that recently her little 
son John looked up and exclaimed, "Mother, 
war is awful isn't it because they go away 
and never come back." His little sister added 
"Well when I get more than four I'm going 
over there and say, 'Here you! Stop this 
war!' ' In speaking of her beautiful vocation 
that of Mother, Ida writes, "It seems to me 
bringing up children is like painting on a huge 



canvas. When at work on it you can't see 
the effect it has on the casual visitor who sees 
it when he first opens the studio door. Once 
you hear his pleased exclamation, you stretch 
your weary limbs, walk to his side and gazing 
at the painting from there you see that your 
many hours of discouragement and effort 
have really brought out the beauty you were 
striving for, but could not see when too close 
to the canvas." 

Mervelle Gratz is just "home" from Gladys 
Frauenthal Gates wedding. She reports "a 
glorious time," a beautiful bride and happy 
groom, which is just what we predicted. Our 
congratulations to Gladys and her husband. 

Caridad Fonte writes from Ojo de Aqua, 
Cuba to Doctor Winslow assuring him in 
her opening word that she thinks often of 
Lasell. She writes, "I did not wish to write 
you until I was able to tell you that I was 
doing something worth while. I am pleased 
today to tell you that I am working. The 
Board of Education of Cienfuegos gave me 
a country school where I started to teach the 
thirteenth of September. This place is 
not very far from Cienfuegos city. It takes 
three hours by railroad to get there. I am 
boarding and go home once every month." 
She sends best wishes to Lasell and friends. 

The Biddeford, Maine, Daily Journal of 
November 13 contains an interesting sketch 
of the life of Mr. Louis H. Goodall, father of 
our Lela, '08, and Mildred, '10. Maine is 
hoping to elect Mr. Goodall as their Con- 
gressman. He certainly has had a remarkably 
successful career. Lasell hopes for his elec- 
tion. 

Elizabeth Linn Mannes, '13 and Ruth 
Coulter Biere, '12, dined at Lasell recently. 
As Elizabeth is visiting for awhile in Brookline 
we shall hope to see her and her neightbor 
Ruth very frequently. Through Ruth we 
heard good news of the continued happiness 
of Elizabeth Beach Bierer, '15. 

Katherine Allen came "home" for a few 
days but left us only too soon taking with 
her alas! one of our new girls, Isabel Larkin, 



90 



LASELL LEAVES 



who is starting on a long sea voyage to Aus- 
tralia with her parents. 

Lasell extends her tender sympathy to our 
present schoolmate Bettina Hovey whose 
mother passed away recently. Mrs. Hovey 
was an old Lasell girl (Jean Edgerton) . 

Our registrar, Lillian M. Packard, '83, 
slipped away for a day or two recently and 
was the guest of her sister, Mary Packard 
Cass, '89 at Tilton, N. H. Here the daughters 
united with their mother in celebrating her 
eighty-fifth birthday. It is a bit late we 
know, but Lasell wishes to join the host of 
friends in extending loving congratulations to 
our dear Mrs. Packard, who has honored 
Lasell with her friendship these many years. 

Our versatile and gifted Nellie Packard 
Draper, '84, is always surprising us with some 
new accomplishment. Recently she dropped 
the cares of her Auburndale home, club and 
churchwork and went up into New Hamp- 
shire to give some very successful lectures ( so 
we have heard on basketry) . 

"AUNT MARY" 

"The healing touch of children's hands." 
No one responded quicker to the spontaneous 
loving ministry of little children than did our 
Miss Nutt. 

How she loved them, and they with the 
intuition peculiar to the open heart of child- 
hood knew and trusted their friend. We have 
seen her companioning with these little ones 
during long summer days away down on the 
quaint sea-washed island of Tuckernuck. 

Three blessed little "sand pipers" would 
patrol the beach by the hour constantly 
running to "Aunt Mary" with some beautiful 
shell or brilliant pebble found in the drifting 
sands. 

Sometimes these three white souls would 
stand together on the shore watching a 
ship as it disappeared in the offing, and trying 
each in their own way to understand the 
mystery of the great waters. 

Of times there were wonderful tramps across 



the moor, when the children would stoop again 
and again to gather some brilliant bit of 
golden-rod or meadow-sweet for their dear 
"Aunt Mary." 

And once the long summer days came 
again, but the children watched the great sea 
alone and sorely missed the presence of their 
dearly loved companion. They were told 
that "Aunt Mary" was not far away but ill 
and suffering and could not come to them. 

What could they do for her now? Day 

after day two little children down by the sea 

prayed this prayer, 

"Go away, go away every ache and pain 
Stay away, stay away never come again." 

By and by as the summer waned, God 
answered their prayer in His way and "Aunt 
Mary" was freed from, pain forever. On that 
last day as we gathered about our beloved, 
there was resting very close beside her an 
exquisite bunch of golden-rod, purple asters 
and her fragrant bay-berries and with this 
touch of the dear Tuckernuck days, a mes- 
sage from, two loving, lonely little children. 

To Aunt Mary 

From Reed and A I pa. 

"We picked this bunch of golden rod 
From those same paths Aunt Mary trod, 
And we are sending it today 
To love her as she goes away. 

How kind of God to take her pain 
Never to let it come again! 
But O! how hard for us to hear 
That we may never find her near! 

We cried a little when we heard, 
For "Never" is so long a word,- 
But Daddy spoke of all her pain 
And'now we've brightened up again!" 

L. R. P. 





We acknowledge with thanks the following 
November exchanges : — 

The Echo, Talladega, Ala.; Centralesia, 
Conway, Ark. ; Purple and Gold, Osceola, Ark. ; 
Artisan, Bridgeport, Conn., Magpie, Water- 
bur}', Conn. ; Lotus, Dover, Del.; Orange and 
Green, Macon, Ga.; Electron, Columbus, Ga.; 
X-Ray, Anderson, Ind.; Optimist, Blooming- 
ton, Ind.; Record, Evansville, Ind.; Maroon 
and White, Danville, 111.; Opinion, Peoria, 
111.; Lion, La Grange, 111.; Purple and Gray, 
Burlington; Aegis, Beverly, Mass.; Imp, 
Brighton; Jabberwock, Boston; Hallock School 
Record, Great Barrington; Grotonian, Groton; 
Hermonite, Mt. Hermon; Archon, South By- 
field ; Argus, Gardener; World, St. Paul, Minn.; 
Gleam, St. Paul, Minn.; K. I. Review, Kidder, 
Mo.; Kyote, Billings, Mont.; E. 0. H. S. 
News, East Orange, N. J.; Vail-Deane Bulle- 
tin, Elizabeth, N. J.; Optimist, Newark, N. 
J.; Billows, Ocean City, N. J.; Orange and 
Blue, Town of Union, N. J.; Vindex, Elmira, 
N. Y. ; Clarion, Rochester, N. Y. ; Quill, 
Staten Island, N. Y.;Lit, Watertown, N. Y. ; 
Optimist, East Aurora, N. Y. ; Student, Roches- 
ter, N. Y.; H. S. Enterprise, Raleigh, N. C. 
Mirror, Lima, O.; Iris, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Garnet and Gray Review, Swathmore, Pa. 
Columbian, Columbia, S. C; Student, Ports 



mouth, Va.; Radnorite, Wayne, Pa.; Topic, 
Jeffersonville, Ind.; Forum, Lockport, N. Y. ; 
Recorder, Springfield, Mass.; Frog, Bay City, 
Tex.; Hermonite, Mt. Hermon, Mass.; Mary- 
land Collegian, Lutherville, Md.; Budget, 
Berne, Ind.; Francis Shiner Record, Mt. 
Carroll, 111.; Tradesman, Boston, Mass. 



AS OTHERS SEE US 

Purple and Gold — This is one of the best 
arranged papers that we have received. 
You have an experienced staff. The cut and 
photographs are all appropriate. 

An advertisers' directory is something 
which you have that every paper should have. 

The Imp — The Lasell Leaves has an interest- 
ing descriptive story on travel. 

Magpie — Your school notes and illustra- 
tions are most interesting. 

Oracle — Your paper is fine but we think a 
few locals would make it more interesting. 

The Lit — Your Fall number is very at- 
tractive especially your cover design. Photo- 
graphs add to your paper very much and we 
think a few cartoons would also help. Lasell 
Leaves is a pride to your school. 

The Dean Megaphone — Lasell Leaves, in its 
June number, furnishes a whole "memory 
book" to its graduates. Pictures and text 



92 



LASELL LEAVES 



combine in an artistic whole that mother will 
be pleased to show her own girl 25 years 
hence. 

The Scroll — We were very glad to see the 
Lasell Leaves back on our exchange table. 
It is the best worked out school publication 
with which we exchange. We congratulate 
you on your paper! 

Maroon and White — We certainly didn't 
intend to leave you out of our exchange list. 
Please excuse us. You have some very 
original and good cuts for department heads. 
Wouldn't it be better to keep the advertising 
matter separate from the main part of your 
magazine? 

Argus — You have a fine monthly. We 
would suggest a better quality of paper. 

Daedalian Quarterly — Your kewpies are 
cute. A few pictures would enliven your 
paper considerably. 

Iris — Why not a few more pictures? 

Garnet and Gray Review — You have an ex- 
cellent literary department. 

Lotus — You have forgotten us in your Ex- 
change Department. 

Now and Then — We are always glad to see a 
St. Paul paper for it is sure to be good. 



Absences makes the heart grow fonder. 
So do presents. — Ex. 



WHOM AND WHAT SOME SONGS RE- 
MIND YOU OF 

At the end of a perfect day — Study Hall. 
There's a light still burning in the window — 

9.46 P. M. 
/ hear you calling me — Rising Gong. 
California and you — Helen Overholser. 

my love would yott, please pidl down the 

curtain — Miss Goff. 
/ want to go back to Michigan — Michigan girls. 
She's a ragpicker — H. McCullock. 
They didn't believe me — L. Woolf. 
Selections from " Nobody Home" — M. Ufford. 
Goodbye, girls, we're thru — Class of 1916. 
We take our hats off to you — Dr. Winslow. 
Chinatown — M. Chan. 
0, you wonderful girl — F. Harris. 
My honorable maid — P. Judd. 
Just a weary in for "you"-—0. Lang. 

1 love to have the boys around me — B. Coward. 
Along came Ruth — All the Ruths. 

My little dream girl — R. Taylor. 
Syncopated walk — L. Lawton. 
Everybody rag with me — M. Wallack. 
When you're away — Gratz — Frankel. 
Its a long ivay to Tipperary — G. Shaw. 
Too much mustard — M. Cloake. 
We were seeing Nellie home — Carol Rice. 
/ love you, or Alice Ben Bolt — M. Cloake. 
Home sweet home — Dec. 15, 1915. 



Mother ( to gentleman who has been staring 
at child for five minutes) . Rubber! 

Old Gentleman — Thank heaven ! I thought 
it was human. — Harvard Lampoon. 



JOKES 

Helen Merrill, in a French resume: — 
"L'homme etait morue." Helen's intentions 
were perfectly good, what she intended to say 
was, "The man was dead," but she made the 
slight mistake of saying, "The man was cod- 
fish." 



Louise Bisbee thought that the Seniors 
were singing Christmas carols December 8, 
but wanted to know who Captain Brown was. 
Some slam on the Seniors pronunciation of 
"Caps and gowns." 



When some girl told Mid C. that she might 
be a candidate for May Queen, she said, "Oh, 
no, you mistook me for the May pole." 



"I'm on a tear," said Mid Cloake, cut- 
ting the pages of her new book. 



Carol Rice in Bible: — 
"Well, I just remember hearing something 
about that years and years ago." 

Just how old do you think you are, Carol? 



LASELL LEAVES 



93 



He — "Could you learn to love me?" 
She — -"I learned to speak Chinese." — Ex. 



First Girl — "Will fasting make you thin?" 

Second Girl — "I don't think so, I lived on 
water for five days last summer and didn't 
lose a pound." 

First Girl— "You did?" 

Second Girl — "Yes, from New York to 
Liverpool. — Princeton Tiger. 



Say, Rastus, did you know that the negro 
races have all descended from Ham? 

That so? Well, it certainly must have 
been smoked ham! — Ex. 



What kind of a typewriter does Harry's 
neck remind you of? 

Can't think unless it is an "Underwood." — 
Ex. 



Mildred is a Senior gay 
She can sing and she can play. 
She can slam the Juniors, too, 
As a Senior ought to do. 

Alice is a Junior sweet 
She and Mildred often meet 
In practice-room, or quiet spot, 
They are always on the dot. 

The other day Marie brought home 
Some liquid for her hair, 
To make it curl was what she wished 
Now look at her back there. 



Bing — So he went to Arizona for tubercu- 
losis. 

Bang — Did he get it? — Ex. 



First young fellow: Did you notice that 
girl smile at me? 

Second young fellow: That's nothing. The 
first time I saw you I laughed all over. 



Fresh Student ( to Prof) . Of course I 
should much prefer an A to an E. 

Prof: Strange that you should prefer a 
perfect stranger to an old acquaintance. — • 
Ex. 



Dorothy — The dentist told me that I had 
a large cavity that needed filling. 

Ethel — Did he recommend any special 
course of study? — Penn. State Froth. 



Prof. — "What three words are used most 
among college students!?" 

Weary Student — "I don't know." 
Prof. — ' ' Correct. ' ' — Exchange. 



Collins & Fairbanks Co. 



EXCLUSIVE 

MILLINERY 

AND COATS 

FOR 

Young* Women 



383 Washington St., Boston 



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FOR ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS 

"Once a Lasell girl, always a Lasell girl." 



WAR NUMBER 



MID-WINTER REUNION AT LASELL 
On February 14, 1916, all Lasell girls in 
this vicinity are invited. Please reply to the 
President, Lasell Alumnae Association, Au- 
burndale, Mass. 



MLLE, LE ROYER'S MESSAGE 

In France 

To my ex-pupils: 

After having passed a winter of anxiety and sad- 
ness, I was glad in June to go to France. On the day 
of my departure for New York I was pleasurably sur- 
prised by the receipt of a letter from Dr. Winslow 
containing a check for one hundred dollars that the 
Lasell girls raised last year for the French hospitals. 
You may imagine my joy at being able to dispose of one 
hundred dollars. 

At the New York dock one knew that France was at 
war, as no one could go on board except passengers 
possessing passports. On the Rochambeau there were 
thirty young men from Harvard and Yale, other young 
business men, doctors from all parts of the United 
States, Canadians, Australians, all on their way to help 
France; women on their way to minister to France, 
some to nurse, others to start schools for the blind. 
There was not one person on the boat going as an or- 
dinary tourist: all the former tourists were changed 
into helpers for France. The feeling experienced on 
this voyage was one of admiration for all these men and 
women, leaving behind them their homes, their families, 
their amusements, to go to help France. 

It was with a strange sensation we approached the 
land. The captain's order to sail without lights; the 
dark sea; the boat going full speed in the night; people 
reassuring themselves by camping out in steamer 
chairs with life-belts near at hand; the long deserted 
corridors; the expectation of something awful to happen; 
all made one say to one's self, "I know I am not ner- 
vous, yet I cannot sleep." All these imaginary terrors 
were swept away the next morning on going up on 
deck and beholding beautiful sunny France. Ah! la 
Gironde! wonderful river! Peaceful vineyards culti- 
vated evenly, long rows of well-plowed vines, the work 
of heroic women of France, whom we saw working, 



working, taking the places of their men fighting at the 
front